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  1. These were an excuse to use up some scraps and to try out round tenons. It was enjoyable to use a rounder as I have few old ones that belonged to my Granddad and Great Granddad who were Wheelwrights. I was also guided by Jack Hill's book on Country Chairs and Bob Flexner's article on soap finish. Interestingly I had no raised grain when applying the finish. The benefit of edge tools rather than abrasive. The next chair shaped object will be a back stool. But first I want to set up my lathe and bandsaw. And I might have some gift boxes to make first. Two of these stools will be gifts and Christmas is coming!
    10 points
  2. OK, ready to go in a box and take a ride to Arizona.
    8 points
  3. Had some different views than normal this week traveling for work. Second hotel view This door is supposedly original from the 15th century.
    8 points
  4. A friend's sister does quilting. We talked about a rack back when I didn't have the shop finished and I completely forgot. Time to catch up. Got the required specs from her and got approval on design number 4. As always wood selection comes first. Like many materials, cherry comes in a variety of colors and figures. I found a couple of similar looking boards that will yield the parts. Rough blanks. I milled to thickness and general size. The shape of the end brackets will let me cut around some pitch pockets in these blanks. I rough the shape out at the bandsaw. Clean it up a bit with some rasps and cut the bottom of the rail notch like you would dovetail waste. This gets me here. I have done a lot of Greene and Greene stuff. During that journey I picked up one of these double round overs. I find the 1/8" and 3/16" radius cutters handle most of what I need. The bit comes with a variety of washer/spacers that allow setting for your material thickness. I use a bit of scrap to set the height and keep the leftover washers in a bag that fits in the tackle box cubby assigned to this bit. The purpose of the bit is to allow you to round both sides at once while always routing down hill. If you've seen much G&G style stuff you get why this is helpful. At any rate, I end up here. If you've ever wondered what you would do with a parrot vise, this is one thing. A little hand work and I end up here. More to come.
    7 points
  5. Still rolling on the quilt rack.
    7 points
  6. Round and round I go. I feel like a dog chasing his own tail. I'll be chasing it another 4-5 days
    7 points
  7. There are many ways to make a tenon. However I would suggest, and I'm saying this from experience. Make your mortise first. Take your time and get it smooth on the insides, and as clean as possible. Then cut your tenon, in any way that works for you, but cut it longer wider and thicker than the mortise your going to put it in. Then with a block plane or a shoulder plane take thin fine cuts equally from both side and along the top and bottom of the tenon. This is especially important if the tenon is to stay in the center of your piece. You only want to take a little at a time from each side of the cheeks. The same amount each time, until it fits snugly. Then the tops and bottoms. The key here is to take the smallest amount possible to make all 4 edges fit as snug as you can make it. Then, if the mortise sides are smooth and the tenon cheeks are smooth, there should be very little glue used to lock them into a single piece. And cut to length, leaving just a tiny space at the bottom of the mortise, to catch any squeeze out. You can make a jig to slide on your table saw to cut the tenon shoulders exactly the same every time. And if you make the jig adjustable, you'll not need a bunch of jigs.. Always make the tenon second, and bigger in all directions so you can trim it down looking for that perfect fit. Patience.
    7 points
  8. After yardwork was finished, Cody and I stopped by Pinson Mounds State Archeological Area, to see the 39th annual Archeofest. The view from atop Saul's Mound is awesome. Here, you can see several of the 'Natve American' vendors that set up to sell food and trinkets. Every year the number of people that can legitimately claim Native American heritage shrinks, to be filled by 'wanna-be' folks that would look more at home at the '69 Woodstock music festival. There are several presentations on Native American culture, including dancers, that are great to watch. The park also does demonstrations of what life was like in the Middle Woodland period, when this site was constructed. Covering 1200 acres, the site contains 15 identified mounds, and hundreds of yards of fort-like earthworks. Believed to have been used as a meeting / market / ceremonial place more than a village, it includes the largest Middle Woodland mound in the US, named Saul's mound. At 72 feet high, it is composed of more that 8 million cubic feet of soil. Stairway up to the platform on Saul's mound. 124 stair steps had me puffing like a steam engine by the time I reached top. Here is the view from the museum walkway on the front side. Pretty impressive for a stone-age civilization.
    7 points
  9. Hung the door I "restored" for the neighbor.
    6 points
  10. We average 11 outages a year. Last year the shortest was 6 hours and the longest almost 72. Of course our old generator crapped out during the 72 hour outage. It was a little over 10 yrs old. Its replacement showed up today. I hope it has a long run too.
    5 points
  11. How many layers/what's the final thickness you're aiming for? Not the clearest photo, but I finally got the joinery all cut for this led-strip lamp, and did the first dry assembly.
    5 points
  12. These are my two most used squares. Starret 6" combo, and a 24" drifting T-square. The drafting square pulls double duty as a straightedge for checking planed surfaces. I alsofind the the wide blade and T head make it much less likely to slip when striking a long line. Both of these have seen a lot of use, but still perform quite well. Having said that, I recently acquired an inexpensive (~$75) set of 10 machinists 1-2-3 blocks, and their squareness is handier than a shirt pocket.
    5 points
  13. Nah, you know we seniors, we relive our teen stupidity as we age. We're all headed back where we came from, It won't be long and I'll be in diapers again. It'll be a relief, no zippers, no urinals, just keep walking. Glad to have you back.
    4 points
  14. My Best Friend and his Wife had a Really Big 50th Anniversary celebration over the weekend. To wind down after it was all over, they brought leftovers from several catered meals over to our place. The Sun gave us a show as it was getting dark. Even though the Sun is setting out of the field of view this time of year, almost every night lately, it's been pretty good. It got better as it got darker, but my phone wouldn't do good any darker than these. It actually got quite a bit better than I can show.
    4 points
  15. When doing long fair curves I find it best to bandsaw and rasp one, then use that to make a template, and do the other end using that template. I happen to have a domino. Otherwise I would probably have done this as a stopped groove with a spline. I had to make a couple hundred mile drive this morning so I am done early for the day. I'll pick it up tomorrow.
    4 points
  16. Absolutely a router table bit. I just had it in the holder / vise to set the height. Any errant tipping while using that bit and things would get negatively exciting . Here's a dry-fit shot, still in the rough.
    4 points
  17. I don’t plan to have any routers dedicated to it at this point. From ky test it’s easy enough to dial it in on the fly. Made a few mini storage drawers for my BS and TS fence rails.
    4 points
  18. In the 30 years in our house I doubt the power has been off more than a couple of times. None of which was for more than a couple of hours. Now that I've said that, it'll probably go off tonight
    3 points
  19. You can see here why I left the rod as a rough blank. This lets me mark right off the piece. I settled on a 3/8" deep notch in the rail I then knock the sharp edges off at the router table. A little hand work and I am ready to start applying finish. One coat. Two coats. Probably one more and then a paste wax.
    3 points
  20. Looks like a tough job, but I guess someone has to do it.
    3 points
  21. That takes one heck of a clamp collection!
    3 points
  22. I will use a domino at the junction of the bracket and the top. This is more to prevent twisting than anything else. I mark the layout on tape to make clean up easier. I clamp a scrap to act as a stop for the middle-o-the-panel mortise. And she fits together like so; although still upside down . And now a PSA break . . . remember to unplug your tools before changing or handling cutters please. I will use mechanical hangers and fasteners. The hanger mounting screws will go through the back and well into the brackets that support the weight of the payload. These are the mechanical hangers I will use. Here's a pic with the metal piece right side up Sorry this is a little random . . . the bracket mortise. The second bracket screw hole that is below the metal fastener (I swear this will make more sense soon). And the first phase glue up of the shelf and back.
    3 points
  23. Just thought this was an interesting picture. Had some cherry sitting on my bench waiting for the temp to drop a little so I can get back in my shop. It was only exposed to the lights in the garage and the color change is quite dramatic over about four months.
    3 points
  24. My assortment of squares includes a 12" square, a 6" triangle and a two inch machinist from Woodpeckers, as well as a 4" Groz. I also have a Starrett combination square (in the red box). For straight I have a 3' Woodpeckers straight edge. These things live safely behind the clamps on my rack and only come down when it counts, e.g. machine set up, or checking square on a turning blank. Otherwise I have a $15 combo square in the tool box.
    3 points
  25. I found this under a tree in my yard today. I’ve never seen a ant mound in the shape of a volcano. The ants are smaller than fire ants and carpenter ants.
    3 points
  26. I'm at 4" now. Hope to get one more on today and finish tomorrow. Pulled the Cherry for the outher ring.
    2 points
  27. 2 points
  28. Got more sleep last night than the previous two combined. Too many late nights and early morning meetings this week. Fortunately they made sure we had plenty of free time and got to do some fun things. Saw a flamenco show at a Michelin 1 star restaurant and had a walking tour in Toledo Spain. Nice to be back home.
    2 points
  29. I also run non-ethanol in mine and use the fuel cutoff as the off switch. I try to run it a couple times a year to prevent it gumming up the carb, so far it’s worked out, though I have never actually needed it for an outage.
    2 points
  30. The generator I use is also a portable one. I only run non-ethanol in it, use the fuel cutoff as the off switch, and keep a spare carb on hand because it might go years between uses. It's something over 25 years old, and still works when I need it. I did have to use a spare carb after one hurricane to get it going, but I had lost track of how many years it had been sitting.
    2 points
  31. I'm not doing much in the shop, but I can still assist now and then.
    2 points
  32. I did one of the outside connections in the 3/8 tubing with one of the Parker Push fittings this morning. I polished the end of the tubing probably as good or better than the average worker does, so feel like it has a good chance. I did leave enough extra tubing so I can braze it if I need to, but I'd make some bet on this fitting. The Sun caught me, so I moved over to work on the shop doors while they were in the shade, and will do another one tomorrow.
    2 points
  33. When that Craftsman combination square with the stainless steel blade seemed like it was lost for good, I ordered the only one I could find on Amazon with a stainless ruler-an Empire. I opened it today, and checked it for square. I was disappointed to find that it was off a tiny bit. I wasn't going to put a lot of time in it since the Craftsman had been found, but I looked it over. The only problem was there was the tiniest bit of paint holding the blade up on one end of the slide. Simple fix, and now it really is a square.
    2 points
  34. I totally agree! When I am working on my finished parts I usually throw a piece of butcher paper over them and so far that has prevented them from getting darker. These parts still have a few final passes through the planner so I was not too worried about them at this point.
    2 points
  35. Well I got it in the clamps finally on the last glue-up. I did wind up doing the narrow ends separately and everything fit together well. But on my actually glue-up for the long aprons my clamps started bending and after I got that settled I was chasing square all over the place on those legs. Unfortunately I'm not great at MT joints yet so my tenon shoulders aren't a good fit at each joint and that makes it pretty hard to see if I've got the tenons all the way in. So far so good!
    2 points
  36. This is my 6" square. I have had this square for at least 25 years. My new 1812 woodpecker above is a real help in cabinet work managing sheet goods.
    2 points
  37. Lots of youtube watching. The channel I settled on was Mad Scientist BBQ. He does a terrific job of explaining the hows and whys of BBQ. I since have smoked some pork ribs and they were perfection.
    2 points
  38. Sorry I haven't been here in awhile. We purchased a house in Yadkinville, NC and to my surprise, our house in San Marcos, CA sold very quickly. The San Marcos house needs quite a bit of work, so I thought it would take awhile to sell, but I didn't even have to list it, just word of mouth to sell it. And we got our desired price. The moving van will be here Sept. 22nd to start their part of the packing and should drive away on Sept. 24th. We will drive to Phoenix the first night and do about 500-600 miles a day until we pull up to our house in NC. We did get a nice surprise: The NC house was carpeted and my wife's walker doesn't work well on it. My daughter, who lives near there, pulled up some of the carpet and found out that the house has cherry and oak hardwood floors. We are getting them refinished and are good to go. Now, to get on topic. I am starting to disassemble the shop and I had several people ask me to document the move. We are using Allied Van Lines for the move. I have to pack the garage and disassemble the tablesaw island, but most of it will just be saran wrapped and pushed onto the truck. I took all of my tools in my tool cabinet, sprayed them down with CRC 3-36 rust preventative, wrapped them in packing paper and reused a crate my son had made for another use. All of my hand tools fit into the crate. My son added a set of Two Cherries bench chisels and Phiel carving chisels to the collection. Everything went into this one crate and the lid is screwed on. That should slow down sticky fingers. I decided to take all of the power equipment, even though I may be buying a Saw Stop when we get there. We will have to see what the budget will hold. There is a 1 3/4 car garage under the house in NC, but the ceiling is only 7 feet high, which makes swinging plywood and longer board a problem. I am going to set up temporary shop in it, then build a shop building after. The city ordinances say I can build up to three 600 sq. ft. outbuildings, so that will be the size of the new shop unless I can figure out away around things. I need enough shop to be able to handle remodeling and some cabinet work as we make the house fit our lives. I have been voluntold that I will be removing the trash compacter and moving the dishwasher to be closer to the sink. For some reason, it is a good 6-8 feet from the sink. Shouldn't be too tough, just enlarge the hole for the trash compactor, redo the plumbing and convert the old dishwasher location into pantry shelves. I also have to do some serious electrical work. The house only has a 100 amp service, but it has four electric meters. The previous owner had a beauty parlor added over the garage and it has its own meter. There was an apartment in the basement that was rented out and it has a meter. I haven't figured out the fourth meter yet. I am going to install a 200 amp service along with a 24KW generator for power outages. I have to have power for a CPAP machine and I don't want to think about what my wife will say if we have one of the extended power outages the South is famous for. Then I have to run a 100 amp subpanel to the garage for now, which will be run to the new shop when it is ready. This is getting kinda long. I will post pictures as we go. First set will be packing the existing shop in CA.
    2 points
  39. Here is the other 3 door panels before 400g sanding and in the door frame.
    2 points
  40. Why I avoid going in to the mower shed in summer. Those studs are 24" OC, putting that skin at about 4 feet long. And there were two more, almost as long. Probably king snakes, which are not venomous, but finding one unexpectedly will still make you hurt yourself!
    2 points
  41. Small squares are the ones that get the most use in my shop. I have a 12" Craftsman combination square that's probably older than Tom's - pushing 40 years. It has seen tons of use over the years. More recently, a friend suggested small double squares for joinery layout. I bought a couple of 4" PEC blems from Taytools (~ $25 each), and they have gotten a lot of use over the past 2 or 3 years.
    2 points
  42. Right. Multi-TON granite tombstones ... I think I'll stick with foam Joe
    1 point
  43. Well said. The edges of the rod will be rounded off once the notches are cut. I should have mentioned that the drawing is just a crude dimensional reference and things like the edges on the rod will be rounded over.
    1 point
  44. I don't know how you're determining "legitimacy" but it's likely not for you or I to do. Appearance alone is certainly no way to determine tribal membership. Remember that Blood Quantum was a US goverment imposition.
    1 point
  45. Tell your Mom we're rooting for her.
    1 point
  46. I love how Cherry gets darker with age/light but when I work with Cherry I take precautions against what you've experienced so that the project has fairly equal pieces when it's finished.
    1 point
  47. I finally got frustrated with breaking down sheet goods with a skilsaw and drywall square. Time to see how much of a piece of junk a $100 track saw is. I spent more money on the tracks, since they're compatible with the Makita tracksaw, but I'll see how the WEN behaves before deciding to sink 4x as much on a better saw. Update: after the first few cuts... Not bad. Even just with the cheapo included rip blade it cuts perfectly straight and reasonable clean. Plunge action could be smoother, but it does the job. There's a lot of plastic parts, but the plate is flat. We'll see if it warps with time/use.
    1 point
  48. I got some real shop time for the first time in 6 weeks. The first thing on the bench was to make some extensions for the handle for the wagon stroller. The axle for the wagon runs across the back and while pushing you hit your feet on the axle often. Megan asked for a fix so I figured this was the easiest way. I made the extensions on the lathe from some Elm. I cut down a tree years ago and cut blanks to make rolling pins. I made 1 rolling pin that gets decent use and a 2nd was never requested. The elm should be strong enough to pop wheelies still with the stroller. It should make it easier giving the pusher (me) some more leverage.
    1 point