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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/06/21 in all areas

  1. Weather finally cooled some.... Its still too hot for this. From left to right 3rd cut 1st cut 2nd cut. It's cool to watch the walnut change color from gross green to chocolate.
    8 points
  2. So almost 4 years later this project needs an update. Maybe a year after completion the rear leg let loose from the lower shelf. There was enough strength in the front joinery (domino) that allowed the stool to continue to function for another 2 years. A few days ago Megan told me the shelf broke, it's used as a foot rest for leg shaving, luckily it broke while not in use. It's started to look rough. We have a lot of minerals in our water so even trying to keep it clean there is only so much a person can do. I'm also suspecting that the white haze is the old finish de-lam
    7 points
  3. All the curved frame rails are now cut and routed. Still some sanding and corner cleanup to do, not to mention repairing a couple of chip-outs where routing 'uphill' wasn't avoidable. Soon, the frames will be complete, and joinery can begin!
    7 points
  4. Took a little time off to go camping with the kids. Just what I needed to get out of the city for a while. Got a little hectic trying to get as much done as possible to be able to go and relax and not think about the clients waiting for me to get back to them. So here is the progress. First thing was to cut the mortises fort the legs. I used the template that I made earlier and attached them with screws. I used the router to cut out the mortis with a guide and a 1/4 upcut bit. The mortis's are 3/4 deep. Then I cut a block to fit the mortises. Making sure that they
    6 points
  5. Where I left off was I had the couch framework dry fitted together. Before I took apart the frame I noticed one back frame slightly lower than the adjoining frame. When I took everything apart I checked and I made a slight error with a measurement. The back frame is supposed to sit 1.5" below the seat frame. I measured 1.75" by mistake. In correcting the mistake I got my self mixed up and moved the mortise hole .25 in the wrong direction. So I said enough of this, filled in the domino mortise with a half of a domino and finally got the mortise in the right place. Next up was fitting
    6 points
  6. A bit more work done on the curved frames today. I clamped them all together and hit 'em hard with a belt sander to smooth out any chipped edges and make the shapes as uniform as possible. I discovered that the carpet tape had managed to let the template shift slightly while routing a couple of them, but the sander brought them all back in line. Then I started the cross pieces that will join the curved rails to their opposing straight rails. I first planned to traditional frame joinery, using M&T or mitered corners. But mulling it over in my head, I realized these pieces will bear no load,
    6 points
  7. It takes a big man to admit when they are wrong and our current society is full of little men. Being faced with a picture of a flaw that spans boards within a glue-up and still denying it is what it is is sad. Glad they will at least get you squared away despite stubbornly denying the obvious. Thank you for not settling. We need to hold people accountable.
    5 points
  8. Bought a couple of new stones to try out. For those that don't read Japanese (raises own hand). It's the sigma Power select II ceramic stones. Lee Valley carries them but I ended up getting them domestically from a place called Heartwood tools. Never heard of them before but the website looked cool, saved a little and most importantly I would get them sooner. Bonus they sent a personalized card and stickers. Who doesn't love stickers. I have a set of shapton pros but always thought the higher grits developed swarf super quick and I constantly have to clean the surface off. Specificall
    5 points
  9. Both HVAC units in and functional. TIme for e few catch-up details before starting the DC shed.
    5 points
  10. My granddaughter said something that made my weekend. She likes to vacuum the shop. As we were going back into the house, she turned to me: "I really like the way your shop smells. It smells lime wood." Made my day.
    5 points
  11. SawDustB, You inspired me - I was going to do the whole enclosed box design but then saw your easy fix with a plastic bin. I couldn't find a bin of the right dimensions but a flip top garbage tidy was a perfect fit. And it seems an ockie stap will hold it in place. Just finished it today and the first test load of dust vanished well :) So thanks again
    4 points
  12. Caught in the act:
    4 points
  13. I heard a commercial earlier that Home Depot has the kids workshop kits again. May have to pick up some of them next time I'm there. Busy day here. Had a contractor fixing a slight leak by our skylight while another was here removing some attic insulation, filling in gaps and blow in some new insulation. Hoping the 2nd floor will stay cooler and we all sleep better.
    3 points
  14. In regards to the spindle sander, it's a real nice tool to have, esp for small stuff. With bandsaw boxes you really can't sand the inside as the fit is predicated on the slightly irregular cut lines matching up for gluing. I guess you can always sand the inside surfaces you are not gluing, but I've found that unnecessary, flocking works great there. Sanding the outside of the boxes with the spindle sander is possible. But for me cleaning up bandsaw cuts mean rasps, rasps, and rasps. Spokeshaves are also nice but you need to watch the grain direction. Rasps have no such worry and they can
    3 points
  15. Toddler + mallet = zero boredom. Just be sure he has safe things to whack on.
    3 points
  16. Mulch, animal bedding (species-dependent), worm farm, mix with parafin, pour into paper egg carton molds to make firestarters, pack into paint cans, using a 2" pipe to form a center hole, creating a 'log stove'. Maybe keep a bucket of chips in the shop, for times when nature calls too urgently to run back to the house?
    3 points
  17. I’m hoping to mill the sycamore log I got a couple months ago if the weather cooperates this weekend.
    2 points
  18. Your first pic is all they should need to see to realize it’s an issue with their finish or finish prep. The area in question spans two separate boards in the lamination, so it is clearly not inherent in the wood grain itself. The grain on the two boards within the affected area is different enough that it wouldn’t be such a ‘regular’ shape. As has been mentioned above, it really looks like they missed a spot when they were pore filling. Your last pic appears to show that section looking much more open and rough in the grain. Have they seen the pictures or have you only describe
    2 points
  19. So far so good. Gonna try and do the rest of my hand tools this weekend.
    2 points
  20. I heard this interesting report on NPR and thought of you. https://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2021/06/08/bees-pesticide-immunity
    2 points
  21. I'm pretty certain a hammer would still keep Cody occupied for hours....
    2 points
  22. I agree, but have you seen seen of the manuals they out out lately? Some are really good, but most should be shed for wasting natural resources. And bloviate is the perfect word for many of the YouTube videos.
    2 points
  23. Ross, it’s obvious that it has been a long time since you’ve had a toddler! Might as well get him a set of drums and a bugle too!
    2 points
  24. Love ‘em. Have several colors to make grit selection quick.
    2 points
  25. There are videos showing how to fix things? I always just use the owners manual or a service manual... . I'm joking though honestly i find printed material a lot easier to follow. Having to skip around a video and wait for some one to bloviate through a 15 min introduction is something I don't have time for.
    2 points
  26. Router sled. Attach beams on both of the long sides of the top and use a string crossing from each corner to get everything flat and true. This flattening method is covered really well in the Roubo flattening method covered by Marc on his bench build but similar methods can probably be found elsewhere. So the string method uses a strong running from each corner crossing in the middle. When the strings just barley touch in the middle the 2 beams are co planar. There are some minor tricks but it's really fast and easy to flatten this way. I did 2 benches in an hour or so. Here are some
    2 points
  27. Finally got the Dust Deputy cyclone I found used set up. Need a hose to go from the vac to the cyclone, but at least it works. My 3 year old son helped me drill the holes on the bucket lid and vacuum up a bunch while I got shocked from it. I tried to sneak down later to set up my jointer knives but he caught me and came downstairs. Hard to set them up (for the first time) with a wriggling kid on your lap. I ended up cutting my finger with the non-sharp side of the knife and decided I'll have to try it again when he's asleep. Thrilled he's taking an interest but I need to come up with
    2 points
  28. If you are thinking of an oscillating spindle sander you should definitely look at the Rigid oscillating belt & spindle sander, or one on the many copies (e.g. Triton). You are essentially getting two machines in one.
    2 points
  29. Widened a doorway in our basement from 36” to 40”. We are having another bathroom put in and wanted clearance to get a 36” tub/shower through.
    2 points
  30. Thanks! It was really fun and I enjoyed the project. Really I just need to start building more as I get too hung up on it will not turn out right or parts of a build are too hard. Usually once you get going things turn out ok or you just have to redo a part here or there and it seems to finish out ok. There is always room to improve but that’s why you have to keep trying. I will have to start another post once I jump into the next project.
    2 points
  31. Went to the recently renovated Veterans Memorial today, thanks to all who’s served and Welcome Home
    2 points
  32. Vehicle prices, hopefully. A coworker had his Silverado totaled by a sleeping driver last week, and can't find a replacement of equal age and mileage, even at a reduced trim package, for less than $8000 more than he paid for it a year ago. My own truck currently has a Carfax estimated trade-IN value about $1500 above what I paid 16 months ago to buy from a brand dealer.
    1 point
  33. I see lumber prices have started to come down. 3 weeks ago a 2x4 stud was 12.99 now it's 8.99. Random length Lumber futures have been on the decline since the middle of may. https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/LBS=F?p=LBS=F&.tsrc=fin-srch
    1 point
  34. I have the sideboard guild build and have built one. Matt makes the bottom a bit complicated. For mine i just made a panel that fit inside the bottom and fastened a ledge around the perimeter to hold the bottom up. Matt's method is frame and panel just with a raised panel that is flush with the rails and stiles. For an outdoor build I'd to do slats with 1/4" gaps between the boards that way you can have good air movement. I'd attach the slats to a cleat on the ends.
    1 point
  35. Back to new! looks good.
    1 point
  36. With out small shower a bench was requested of me to make shaving legs easier. Some of you may remember me asking questions about this. This is the finished product. I didn't take many pictures working on it and it really only took me a couple days. The stand is made from Ipe and was glued together with epoxy. This wood smells terrible, i feel like i have to wear a respirator just looking at it. That being said after i got finish on it i want to make something else out of it because it is beautiful. Glueup went all in one go with the epoxy. I used my bench to get it square and built outwa
    1 point
  37. @Woodworking_Hobby, were the planks jointed on one face prior to going through the planer? Many new woodworkers do not fully understand the relationship these machines maintain. The jointer is used to create one flat face, while the thickness planer references that flattened face in order to make the opposite face parallel and smooth. Using the planer alone will not remove twists and bows from a board.
    1 point
  38. Thanks! I will give it a try and see how it goes! I must admit I am a little nervous as I have not done that much hand plane work on my projects and was worried I was going to take off too much or not get flat. I was a little disappointed on how “rough” it turned out but maybe that is typical. I thought I had the boards all milled to the same thickness and used the domino trick for alignment similar to what folks have done on their Roubo builds. From lowest stop to highest spot on the slab is maybe a hair under an 1/8 or a hair over a 1/16…hard to tell. Maybe that is a win but from some othe
    1 point
  39. I've done both and found them equally tedious but the router sled faster. That said the hand plan can get you a good work out.
    1 point
  40. I think i learned it from a YouTube video but it is the perfect word for many videos.
    1 point
  41. Hand planes were used to flatten slabs ling before routers were invented, but they do take some effort. You need a solid support to hold the slab still. Use wedges under the high spots to prevent rocking. Winding sticks, a longer straight edge, and a lot of eyeballing will show the high spots on the upper face. Knock those down and recheck. When it gets tough to see the high spots, use a long jounter plane, if you have one. Once the upper face is satisfactory, flip it over and scribe around the edge, measuring from the flat reference face. Plane down to your scribe line to make the other
    1 point
  42. I also prefer smoothing with handtools to sanding. When the bandsaw comes in, I wanted to make some bandsaw boxes with my kids, and for most of those bandsaw box designs, I don't think it would be possible to use a spokeshave or a card scraper. That was one of the reasons I was thinking about getting the spindle sander down the line.
    1 point
  43. Winding sticks are very useful for that and they are easy to make.
    1 point
  44. That panel is veneered plywood of some sore be careful sanding. You may have sanded enough of the veneer away that there is no wood left to absorb stain. If you sand the entire panel there is risk of sanding through the veneer. Color matching a piece like this can be difficult. Depending on the value of the piece hiring a professional to refinish the bottom may be the fastest, easiest, and cheapest option. Once you sand through the bottom veneer there is no fixing it, aside from paint.
    1 point
  45. +1 for Ridgid belt/spindle sander. However, I do get a lot of nonconsensual manicures when using it on smaller pieces.
    1 point
  46. Very nice, so you will have seven of those curved arch pieces in the display, correct?
    1 point
  47. Today was a little walnut log recovery. Milling to happen later today when the driveway is in shade.
    1 point
  48. Got a little more prep done. I'm not sure if I showed this before. This is the general idea for the exhaust. Although not shown in this quickie version of the baffle tower, the shelves will be changeable as I am unsure of the impact of the captive air mass in that chamber. I am building in the ability to go to an upgraded unit if required but am hoping I can make my little 2HP unit do the job via careful duct and exhaust pathway resistance planning (fingers crossed).
    1 point