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  1. Circling back to close this customer designed, horse tack, shadow box. Being picked up tomorrow. Open areas at top and center are for an embroidered team name tag off of a riding vest and some awards.
    7 points
  2. This will be my last update for about 2 months. My upholsterer told me that he would be ready for my project towards the end of February. I also just finished a matching ottoman. I figured a lounge chair would be even more comfortable with a foot rest. I just need to put on a finish coat of Polyx. I have one coat of Extra Thin on it now. I think the ottoman will give additional leeway for those with varying heights where they now do not have to place their feet on the floor. It should certainly be more comfortable. Finally, I included the fabric/color that I choose. See you in about 2 months, I hope.
    7 points
  3. I received the last couple of pieces for my no router table top and fence.
    7 points
  4. Quick win project between rounds of playing in the snow with my kids. We recently upgraded my middle kid from a toddler bed to a twin bed. We found a decent used wood bed with drawers below. One of the center support/guides for a drawer was broken so I made a new one. It was a nice opportunity to try out my new shop layout and DC setup. Broken piece had some crazy grain. New one made from a scrap piece of maple. Edges eased with my little stanley. Then a quick coat of shellac and then wax. In place and back in service!
    7 points
  5. Couple backorders were delivered on Friday!
    7 points
  6. I have had to accept that I need to empty one of the storage areas sooner than I need to spray finish so some lumber is going in that space . I have made several versions of this sort of rack. This one should only be in use for about a year so it is cobbled from items found. A piece of unused siding that has laid out in the rain a few times will make the tilted deck. Yes it is cupped from exposure to the elements. I clamped it to the bench to determine the height of the supports once it gets squashed flat by all the lumber. The kickers at the rear keep the boards . . . well . . . kicked out from the wall at the bottom. The wall rail is made from the same water damaged plywood that was leaning between a shed and a wall for a couple of years. We're talking quality materials here boys. The wall rail in this version is a sandwich of however many layers it takes to bring it into plane with the vertically stored boards. The sandwich gets fastened to the wall via some Spax fasteners. Heads recessed so they don't snag things. The object for me in vertical lumber storage is to keep the material upright. This is helpful in that there is no real lateral stress or heavy weights to muscle through when sorting stock. I rip a length of that same plywood, drill an appropriate diameter hole at the right height and connect the dots with the bandsaw. I didn't need many dividers for this 7' or so run but just made up what the one ripped off strip would yield plus a nicer piece that was my test divider. Due to its weather tolerance I had relegated a small cache of white oak to a less than stellar storage area. I thought it would be best to haul this stuff in first. The dividers are used to divide species, thicknesses or types (QSWO, RSWO, etc.). Over the years this has worked out for me elsewhere. You can see the unused dividers just rest in the wall rail. Schlepping this material a couple of boards at a time is a drag. After breakfast I will drive the truck down there and load it up for a more efficient point A to point B relocation method. A side benefit is that I can pick out material as I go for something I am planning for the living room.
    6 points
  7. The Mystery I dug up the old rotted planks and... There was nothing but gravel underneath them. So now I need to grab a half yard to smooh everything out, but at least the shed floor will be stable. Still no idea what they were for originally. Best guess I could come up with was maybe an old tool stand for a compressor, since it's not far from a 30amp outlet. Lighting I got another 10 fixtures installed, and I am loving them. I screwed two fixtures to a piece of 2x2 scrap and hung that from the old fleurescent chains. It's not the prettiest solution, but it does even out the light nicely right over where I'm planning to put the main bench. I'll probably do another bar hanging over the front of the bay and I want to add a line of lights over what will become the stationary tool wall as well. I had originally considered re-using some of my old feit fixtures upstairs, but they'd look pretty bad next to the new ones, so I hung the old fixtures out in the (sadly treasureless) woodshed. Insulation I called the outstanding insulation contractors. One hasn't gotten back to me yet and the other seems to have lost my bid entitely. So with no movement there, I decided to go ahead and tackle the garage doors. Of course, the first thing I did was drive the horn of my lumber rack right into the bottom and mangle the whole damn door. An hour or so of swearing, clamping, and bending and I was able to get the worst of the damage out, fix the wheels that had jumped, and kept my airseal. I went with EPS, for both its cheapness and its relative weight versus XPS. The doors are already becoming a bit of a pain to open, and who knows how long it'll take to get someone out to re-tension the spring and tune the track alignment. I may add another layer of something over the rails, for looks and to help with transfer through the metal bars. A good sharp knife kept the foam pebbles manageable. One door takes three full sheets of foam and an entire roll of aluminum tape, but it already feels nicer working next to it. The most important addition Tunes! I had a little bluetooth speaker setup, but I finally got the old receiver and surround sound shlepped over from the old house and installed. Between the heat (I can hold at around 65 when working during the day), lighting, and sound, the shop is finally at a point I could actually start comfortably working on projects. Obviously I'm not stopping here, but it's very heartening to have the space feeling comfortable. Bonus This cute little fella joined me today for lunch outside.
    6 points
  8. Finally all done…now I am scared to use as a bench and mark up the surface :-)
    6 points
  9. I cut out the boards for the moveable shelves ... nothing exciting, just boards milled 6 square ... but a great excuse to use the new shooting board Then there was no putting off the glue-up much longer ... And finally the moment of truth ... does it fit in the door-frame ... yes!
    6 points
  10. This Sunday update is of the second of the six sides of the M7. Do not judge too severely on the mini checkerboard. The squares do not mesh as they should. The pieces were from a game table I made four years ago, (that is why the table photo is being displayed). When I made the game board for the table these bits were left over from trimming the rows. I glued the pieces up and it this mini board laid around the shop for years before I recycled it into this project. To convey some of the purpose of this design, I uploaded pages from the documentation book which went to the buyer. I hope that the dimensions given clarify the overall size and scope of the venture. Side three pictures will be uploaded in my Wednesday post.
    5 points
  11. Gadzooks! I can’t believe three weeks have slipped by since I last posted. I did take several days to make a lathe mount for the carving stand (which has been very useful). And there was some personal business in there, too. But if I’m honest shaping and smoothing the four top edges was a tedious and un-inviting task, and it probably didn’t get as much enthusiastic participation from me as it might have deserved (i.e. it was easy to find “better” things to do). Call it ten days of hobby time. Now I know, “it didn’t happen without pictures”, and I did snap some, but rather than bore you with photos of a lot of sanding how about just one of a lot of sand: And after shaping and sanding the top edge here is what the base looks like: I think the smooth sweeping curve of the edge is a strong feature of the piece. I have to keep reminding myself of that because the bottom edge remains to be done. While the base is still mounted I took the opportunity to go over the outside surface with p1200 and address the inevitable boo boo’s on the surface. I can’t really access the bottom edge adequately while the base remains mounted to the sacrificial block, so the time has come to remove it. First step is to remove the template and it’s retaining bolt to make more room for the saw. Then remount onto the screw chuck. Now a flush cut saw very carefully placed flat against the sacrificial block. Then worked slowly and carefully under the foot until it is released. Repeat that for the other three feet. The blue tape held on well and I’m going to “say” it did its job. There was no no visible squeeze out. Maybe there was a tiny bead that was sawn away, or maybe there was none to begin with, but, in as much as there was nothing to clean up, I’m calling that a success. There are some boo boo’s at the edges, and this despite being extremely careful with the saw. I’m hoping that they will clean up with some light sanding. Next bit will be to bring the bottom edges to final contour and sand them smooth. I have no ready means to mount the base, so at this point I think I will have to hand hold it while doing this work.
    5 points
  12. If there is one item in the shop I could dump money on to improve, it would be the dust removal system.
    5 points
  13. I enjoyed the 'major winter storm' that left the local grocery totally devoid of milk and bread before 9 am yesterday.
    5 points
  14. @ChestnutIt is only temporary by location. It is in the space reserved for my spray booth . If things work out a panel-shorts bin that takes up about 8 square feet of floor space will get replaced by the new panel-shorts space behind the plywood corral. My permanent vertical storage will then move to the old panel-shorts bin location. Its like Christmas today. I moved that white oak and found a nest of sapele. I moved the sapele and found some walnut. I also found some over-ten-foot stock in the area I am trying to empty. I will move the sub-10 foot stock out of the horizontal racks and put it in the vertical space. This should allow me to put the long stuff in the horizontal racks and make enough room to empty the area that is in need or 'use reassignment'
    4 points
  15. It resides at a man's home whom likes to write sizable checks--which clear the bank!
    4 points
  16. Sounds like you've made your decision and what is right for you is the right decision. Since I have drops for dust collection pipe anyway I just ran the power down that pathway. I've worked too many places where floor outlets end up in a walk way after something changes . On the other hand I tend to over-think things a lot. I added sections of flex between the j-boxes and the drop conduits. If something changes drastically I can back-pull the wire, swap the flex for a longer piece, re-run the wire and re-position things. I'm not trying to change your mind. We all just tend to offer up things that have worked for us. This doesn't mean it will necessarily be the right choice for someone else .
    4 points
  17. I've had HF and I have a fancy expensive system. My only regret is not getting the fancy system sooner. Shop is cleaner, house is cleaner, I can work with out a dust mask. It's amazing how much more enjoyable the hobby is when your space is clean. At least it is for me. Yeah it's expensive but all things considered my tools have already paid for them selves 2X over and I have the value of a new car invested in my tools.
    4 points
  18. Most people on this forum are hobbyists. That means that the goal is not always "getting by," but for some it's enjoying the process and the interaction with the tools. I "get by" with my HF DC, but my next tool purchase will likely be a better one. Better DC = less sawdust and fine particulates in the air = healthier lungs, less cleanup, and fewer sawdust boogers. Cost/benefit analysis is different for everyone.
    4 points
  19. The screw measures 26” long and is 2-1/4” in diameter and is accomplished from a solid 12/4 piece of walnut. The design is solely based on the concept of the Greek mathematician Archimedes (200 B.C.). Clamping material to the spline of the saw acts a depth stop therefor I can create a reference point when I begin carving. I used a flat chisel to remove the bulk of the material and creating a “V” shape. The “V” channel allowed room for the curved chisel to get in and begin the carving process. A SHARP scraper helps to remove material and is a gauge to assure the curve is uniform the whole of the spiral. The scraper first addresses the excavation in a skewed angle and is turned to the geometric center of the spindle as the proper radius has been achieved. Once the curve was attained, I then spun the cylinder on the lathe and used a block of wood and sandpaper to smooth away any of the chips on the edge of the carving. This was a very slow process and was tough on the hands and wrists.
    4 points
  20. The brick pattern is segments of paduk with maple veneer replicating mortar in a masonry pattern. Cutting slices off the blocks which I glue up and alternating form one block to another and flipping and rotating the individual four-row sheets makes for a random placement of the grain color variations. The two rim gears are made from 24 pieces of quartersawn wenge in a three-layer bricking pattern making for a very stable plywood type of application. Cutting the involute teeth on the scroll saw then cleaning the saw kerf with a Grobert file went rather efficiently. I wrapped a piece of black palm in black dyed veneer then cut slices as if I were slicing lunch meat which created what I hoped would look like asphalt roof shingles. Then I put the roof onto a little shack made from yellow heart clapboard siding with holly trim and mahogany windows and entry door. The utility shack was made to hide a step motor from view. The inner gears which register the rim gear are maple with East Indian rosewood axles with ebony and yellow heart warning medallions. The other gears are shop fabricated quartersawn white oak gears of three layers with the center layer offset 90 degrees from the otter layers. The use of quartersawn material in the gear making will hopefully minimize the wood movement from making my circular gears into oval shapes. The back of the structure has a quarter-inch thick cherry burl book matched cherry ledge. The support structure of the “Gears for Spheres” apparatus is built using bubinga shop made plywood. The troughs are Honduran mahogany, and the hand sculpted gear loader is maple. The element sits I the M7 tiers attached to the tabletop with three brass screws. Before I get asked, yes it works exactly like it looks it should work.
    4 points
  21. I've never even seen a snow blower, but talking about things getting old and playing out, our microwave quit yesterday. I think it's the only one we've ever had. Pam was a bit miffed that it stopped working, but I looked at the label on the door, and it said 1986. I told Pam that I didn't think it owed us anything else, and that it had been a good one.
    4 points
  22. These darn nationwide supply shortages are really affecting us. My snow blower has seen it’s last days and I can’t find one around here anywhere!
    4 points
  23. Got some more time in the shop today... A few shots of the main tools I use for shaping Also these new vices are really handy for this project being able to move the chair position without actually un clamping it is very nice. Sometimes holding parts on one end with my chest First up today was to rough out the remaining joints on the base Then with some scraps from the bent lamination back slats I started working through the process off how to cut them to the right length QUESTION: In another post earlier this week I believe it was @Ronn W on veneer holes there was a discussion about using coffee grounds with epoxy to fill holes. I was think of trying that technique out on this: It's about 1/8" hole about 1/4" deep what do you think? How do you do it just mix them in and go? Thanks!
    4 points
  24. Tired of harrassing the electrons that make up my CAD model, I decided to work with actual wood today. Cody wants to use the "cross tie" he got from @Spankya while back. This is a 9"x7"x8' maple cant. Thanks to Spanky's excellent job of cutting, it remained fairly straight, with just a bit of twist. These cheap Swanson cutting guides make very good straight edges and winding sticks. Cody didn't get away scott-free, I "encouraged" him to help square a reference corner on the cant. He didn't last long, but I don't blame him. I'm 6" taller and 100lb heavier, and was still quite tiring to hand plane so high up. Eventually, we got the first face flat and straight. On the adjacent 'edge', I used a circular saw and guide to establish a square corner. Unfortunately, that still left about 4.5" of wonky material. I found the kerfing across every few inches and hacking the waste out with a chisel went fairly quick. Only 6 more feet to go! Spanky, if you are reading this, know that I owe you one....
    4 points
  25. Hello all. I have decided that I have an abundance of time on my hands (sorry, even I had to laugh at that.) and so, we decided to remodel the kitchen. This will be no easy undertaking because we have decided that at the same time, we will be replacing the entire first floor with hardwood floors (currently tile) So, the wife loves the Maple vanity I built for the upstairs bathroom, so we are going with maple again. Thought it would be a nice change of pace from the dark outdated oak we currently have. Looking around the internet, I have come across a lot of cross talk about whether or not the base should be 1 piece along with the carcasses, or to build a separate base that can be leveled and then the carcasses set on top of a level work surface. I am going with the later. There is something kind of cheesy looking about the outer side pieces having 1 continuous board from top to bottom with the toe kick notched out. I like the offset look. plus, the option to level the base and come back and just plunk down the bulky part of the cabinet seems just better somehow. This will be my biggest project to date and maybe forever (lol), so I am calculating everything I possibly can, to minimize waste and heartache. Wood can be plain, or beautiful from board to board. My question is Is it best to buy your wood from one location? I have a "Wood cart" near by that sells slab wood of many species. I could go this route and try to mill up the wood myself. My planer (dewalt 735x with wings) is um... well... it works, but it does this weird thing where as the board is feeding, it sort of pauses or slips and its not really snipe, but its... well, a slight gouge maybe 1/32" about 2 to 3" in on the feed side of the board happens. Then the rest of the process is perfect. So.. do I get some S4S boards?! Do I take my planer to a specialist and get back to trying to mill up my own stuff? I tend to put positive pressure on the board as it begins feeding into the planer to try to prevent the pause. Sometimes it works, sometimes it does not. I have a joiner, which could do a portion of the milling, but not all. I also have a bandsaw with a 3/4" rip blade and a 1/2" blade as well. Do I hand sand all the boards after sending them through my own planer? I have had good luck running the boards through my table saw and flipping them over end over end raising the blade a little each time. Any suggestions or thoughts would help. I get a lot of compliments on my vanity, so I am hoping to have similar luck, but on a grander scale :)
    3 points
  26. Spent a couple hours pushing a saw today. It was 18* in the shop this morning, but I didn't need any heat by the time I got this far. That shine is definitely not my natural glow. I really owe Spanky for this one! The task is actually going fairly well, considering the saw has about twice the teeth it should for this job. Thankfully, once this rip is complete, I'll have pieces that I can manage with machines.
    3 points
  27. Rock on. I stole the idea from one of the smaller yards I use. In the immortal words of Butch Cassidy "Well, that oughta do it . . . " At least the space I needed cleared out is nearly done. Just a few long sticks to put up on the wall racks and I'm good.
    3 points
  28. Sorry to say but this is not the end, this is still foreplay. There will be more pictures.
    3 points
  29. So we’re getting a bit closer to the start of this build. To catch you up, I’m building a 1200sq ft, wood framed shop dedicated solely to woodworking. Ceiling height will be 14’ for the possibility of parking RVs or boats in the building should I ever wish to sell the property (much more common toys down here than table saws and jointers). I’m taking @gee-dub’s idea and putting a 3/4 height wall about 8’ from the back wall to allow for a space for finishing. I’ll be running some electrical through the slab to keep from having to hang electrical cords down from 14’, so I’ve been playing with the layout a bit. Obviously things tend to change over time as you work in a shop, but want to at least get to where I have an idea of where outlets should be placed in the floor. Based on some suggestions given in another current thread, here is what I have. Some of the tools are existing, some are purchases as soon as the shop is built, and others are sized for what I hope will be upgrades in the future. As always, I welcome thoughts, suggestions, and critiques.
    3 points
  30. Not really any tuning, but lubing, and installing a table lift. I bought this lift system off ebay years ago. I have two Powermatic 1150's. One a belt changer, and the other a Reeves drive. I put off deciding which one to put the lift on, but the Reeves drive requires some work if I let it set for a long time. This old belt changer is 100% reliable, and really is easy to change the belt on, so I decided to get this one going. I have a strong rope attached to a chain that I use the loader to lift some things. I tied the rope around the column. The hard part was getting the base off. I ended up ruining a HF 4 pound dead blow hammer, but did get it off. To get the base back on, I used the dead blow hammer to lean against a cribbing block, and a 10 pound sledge hammer. The bigger hammer worked. Serial number lookup says it was made between 1964 and 68, and I don't think the base has ever been off of it. I thought about taking the column all the way off, and soaking it in rust remover, but I'm fixing it because I need to use it, so don't have time to worry about cosmetics. It spins dead true, and I can change the belt position in less than 30 seconds without getting in a hurry. The table lift is slow, but smooth and accurate. I think it will be easier to use it for adjusting some hole depths than the limit stop, which is in itself one of my favorite things about this beast. I don't know how much it weighs, but it's more than it looks like. I bought it from a school auction in 1975 that I also brought an 8" jointer home from. I've used it that long without a table lift mechanism, but it will finally be a pleasure to use it like this. I have a Lee Valley table coming for it. I didn't want bright red or blue, and I like the LV fence. No time to make one.
    3 points
  31. You have been very helpful. Thank you for the awesomeness and the sensible things you impart. I am actually from Norway, but I am residing in Nebraska now. My grandpa when he retired he lived in Switzerland, that's why I got this Badog CNC machine few months before his passing. I am also planning to live a new life there soon and stay for good. I really love woodworking and metalworking is my next thing to study once I mastered this woodworking and woodturning stuff. I really appreciate you. Have an awesome one!
    3 points
  32. dig 90' down, if there is a stone marker with strange markings call the History Chanel ASAP, if it were me i would have to dig, at least some way down, i love a good treasure hunt
    3 points
  33. Time flies eh? Insulation I got one completed quote for spray foam insulation, which was unsurprisingly a kick to the wallet. Getting the whole shop up to residential insulation (R38ish in the ceiling, 21 in the walls) came in at a solid $21k. If I did just the ceiling and reduced the spray thickness it's only $7.5k, which is still my entire on-hand cash reserve for getting the shop up to snuff. Still waiting on two more quotes to come in. One company will be giving me both spray and batting options, the other only batting. I'm resigned to probably doing the walls myself again, and putting the real money into the ceiling and other parts of the shop. Lighting and Electrical I got the new LED lights up on one side of the shop, and man it's a night-and-day difference. I've already ordered more lights to put up on the second set of trusses. The placement of the two overhead fans isn't ideal, or even, but after some trial-and-error I'll stick with 4x4ft sections on each end of each truss, for 16 lights front-to-back in the main shop area. I'm still going to experiment with adding some hanging fixtures (I've got 4 extra of these lights) to fill in any dim areas like the center or over tools. There's a bit of a shadow from the garage door bars, but it's mostly in a part of the shop that's not currently earmarked for anything, so I'm not going to worry about it for the moment. Worse case I add a platform 18" down from the truss and have one lower set of lights. These Barrinas are nice and bright and definitely a higher-quality overall than the Feits I was using in my old shop. They're clear-covered, so if you look at them you can see individual spots... But I wouldn't recommend looking directly at them anyways. The manufacturer/brand has a similar light with about half the lumen density and a frosted cover which I'll be using in the upper loft area since there's not enough headroom not to have the lights directly in your line of vision. The rolling scaffold on the left is a godsend, especially for someone (me) whose not a fan of ladders. I've been bolting it to the walls for some extra rigidity, and use a 2x10x8 on-edge bolted to the narrow end when working in the middle of the shop. It's been working great and I highly recommend getting one if you've got tall ceilings. The whole thing breaks down flat if I ever need to store it. Structure Had to happen eventually, and I can't say I was surprised by what I found behind the old interior plywood sheeting. I mentioned that this place was a dog-training facility before I bought it, and well, the mice definitely appreciated a steady source of food and bedding material. Looks like they were using the wiring holes as a super-highway to get into the cavities in the walls. I think every single sheet I pulled down had at least a small nest. No evidence of live rodents though, which is interesting. Given that I only sealed up the exterior holes recently, I assume the prior owner used something to get rid of them. Poison would be a bad idea with all those dogs around, but who knows. Either way I shoveled and shop-vac'd up a lot of nests and mummified mice. There's a little mold on the inside of one wall, but on the whole everything looks to be in good shape. I need to silicone up some nail-holes on the exterior siding, but that's about it. Weatherizing/Heating I've gotten all the major holes in the walls filled up, and most of the cracks I can see light coming through. Got the garage door tracks re-aligned to the openings, though they're not as smooth to open now, and only have a couple more pieces of vinyl to install to get them fully air-sealed. The shop is already a lot more pleasant to work in, especially after I added a 5000W electric heater. Cheap to buy and expensive to run, but this thing really helps take the edge off. I don't trust it unattended, but with just a few minutes it'll get the air temp up 3-5 degrees, and I already had an RV outlet for it. All told I've got about 8000W of electric heat spread around the shop right now. Not a great long-term solution, but good enough to get moving forward. A little mystery While working in the attached lumber shed, I walked over a hollow-sounding section of gravel. Childhood stories of buried treasure (or bodies) racing through my mind, I pulled back the rocks and this is what I found. I can't figure out what these rotted old timbers would have been for. The slab/skirt of the garage itself seems to run right past them. There is an older concrete slab a little beyond the edge of the woodshed, but they don't connect, and these timbers would have basically always been below grade in this spot. What's more, this shed seems to have been built inside an old access easement (working on that separately) that dates back to before my lot was even split off which makes it seem unlikely to have been a deck or old basement or whatever. The osb-sheeting seems to have been added later, before the current gravel layer went in, but in some places it's butted up tightly and in others it's just thrown down willy-nilly over more gravel. Any ideas what this used to be? I don't really want to start an archeological excavation here (I can't see anything but dirt under the rotted timbers) but I feel like I should probably know what's going on here before I start filling this shed with stuff.
    3 points
  34. Ken, you've seen mine, it's the HF 1 1/2 DC and as you know it's ducted to the outside. So my set up wouldn't work for you, and I'm using 4" piping at a 9 ft ceiling. However it works well at all 5 stations.
    3 points
  35. I know several people who went with the Super Cell and like it. I couldn't give you any specifics, but I have not heard them voice any complaints. I have a Laguna P-Flux 3, and I think it was a good trade off of cone separator performance and height. At this point in my life I never want to face having to get 50 gallons of sawdust out of the basement, so a smaller bin is fine with me.
    3 points
  36. We tested yesterday and just were notified that both my wife and I are positive. We both have had sinus symptoms for the last 2-3 weeks and feel no different than before. Not proof positive that the two shots and and the booster helped but .......!
    3 points
  37. Don't worry, your new one will break in approximately 18 months.
    3 points
  38. Just a clue, it is part of a larger project.
    3 points
  39. What do think you will use to sheath the walls inside? Or will you leave the insulation exposed? If I was going to sheath, I'd be sure to mark the sheathing for the locations of those studs, and the uprights. Just looking at that structure now and I think it will have some advantages when it comes to hanging a simple tool rack, and some challenges when it comes to high load shelves.
    2 points
  40. I had a bunch of PM work meetings so I only got a few hours in this past week, other than the weekend. I've started on the large task of making the dust/web frames. I got a rough idea of the material needed and milled up parts. For some of the dust frame parts I needed a cherry edge band for the visual face. The past few times I've had to do banding I've gotten into the habbit of using my bench as a caul. It works amazing well to distribute pressure evenly along a joint where one of the pieces is very flexible. I needed to get everything to finished thickness to figure out some relative dimensions with in the case of the dresser. Once I figured out the thickness I could measure the width and cut the front rails and begin the back structure. I also need a middle divider with rails to support the dust frames in the middle of the case. This will connect to the back of the dresser to provide additional support to the frames. The front bottom rail will be very small and delicate looking so the weight from the drawers will need some additional support. The case is upside down in the picture below. Making the dust frames has been mentally challenging. I've needed to try and figure out dimensions and ways to trim the frames such that everything is square. To aid in this I made a glue jig on my spare work bench. I took the extra leg I made just in case and clamped it down. I then squared a corner I then placed the plywood so the 2 sides that were square would provide me a square corner to clamp into. When gluing the dust frames I just made sure that the frame was against the piece on the right and the plywood snugly. Each of the frames came out nice and square this way. Some of the frames I made a bit oversized and will be cut down later. Now that most of the dust frames and together I put glue on the rear structure and glued it together. I will then remove it from the case to cut a rabbet for the plywood backer. I'm trying to create as many sub assemblies as possible so when the glue up happens it has as few of parts as possible.
    2 points
  41. The case of the moving steps is quarter-inch plywood with mahogany veneer on the inside and eighth-inch thick white oak siding and wenge trim. The steps are spalted butternut and red cedar and they rest upon maple cams and the steps are joined together with teak dovetail supports. The dark shadowy Billy B. is gaboon ebony. The drive shaft is turned from curly prymiria and is attached to the bubinga drive gear with a wedged tenon. I used manufactured dowel pins as the teeth of the offset gears. I wound up having to alter the number of teeth from 13 to 15 teeth to get the gearing correct. Much of this M7 project incorporated a number of "do-overs" because even though I had the concept in my head, sometimes my math did not equate to the actual behavior of the system.
    2 points
  42. Me and my wife’s mutt spent about 30 minutes walking at the dog park today. The winds were about 20 mph but I still avoided anyone else there. Hopefully, just an inconvenience. Thanks!
    2 points
  43. When I read “contact us for a price” and “make an offer”, I knew I probably didn’t have room for it!
    2 points
  44. I use a similar pad protector linked above, i think it is made by Mirka. Whoever makes it, it is less expensive than Festool. If I remember correctly it was in the $5 range. For me, using the intermediate pad the hook and loop outlasted the foam on the Festool pad.
    2 points
  45. @Coop, sorry to hear about your positive test and the need for isolation. But it's good to hear you are not terribly symptomatic. ...and that is the shots working for you .
    2 points
  46. I hope that the symptoms stay mild for ya. I believe that the shots are helping people have mild symptoms and recover faster. Megan and I both visited a friend who tested positive 2 days after our visit. Neither of us got it.
    2 points
  47. Yes, like Ross said. I'm told you van also use new dry grounds. Paul if you have a spare bit of the wood, drill a hole and fill it with the mix. When it cures sand it smooth and see for yourself. The grounds won't sand as smooth as the epoxy, but that's a bigger issue for me than it may be for you. Some other caveats (which you may already knowl: If you need a dam to hold the epoxy in place, I used hot melt glue. I've seen people use various tapes, too. You probably want an epoxy pour that fills the cavity, so air bubbles don't show. A less viscous mix might be better, but if you drill a couple of test holes you can try different viscosities. To get rid of air bubbles you can use a hair dryer, or judicious application of a heat gun.
    2 points
  48. Went to the musical Come from Away last night. It was one of the best musicals I've been to. If that's your type of thing and you get the chance to go I recommend it.
    2 points
  49. I don't drink coffee either. I snagged a big filter full from work, and let them dry well before mixing into epoxy. I suspect using wet grounds would go cloudy or something.
    2 points