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  1. OK, it's been awhile, and my patience has finally paid off. My upholstery guy took the month of July off, and with the backlog of work he had to do I just got the couch back this week. So it's time to put a bow on this build. I like the fabric we picked, the cushions and couch look real clean and it sits very well. The MCM look is beginning to permeate my home, and this project will result in a few matching pieces for the room (love seat, coffee table, end tables). So here's the finally couch; Thanks for following along and I hope this was enjoyable to watch, I can say it was enjoyable to build.
    11 points
  2. Well you might not get to 50 if you don't come up with some good story fast to explain why you have your arm around that college girl.
    10 points
  3. Finally Finished the Bench!!!! Now a three part finish of equal parts of spar varnish, thinner, and Boiled Linseed Oil. First project from the bench will be a new tool cabinet to fill the space in front of the bench so that my most used tools are right there at the bench at the ready! Just about burnt up this poor drill - drilling 24 holes through 4" hard maple
    9 points
  4. Thanks guys. Yes that is an old car sub-woofer. It has been looking for a purpose in life ever since I got rid of the car it was installed in. It now provides the low, low end for the shop tunes. A little more progress this morning :-) Seems like a workbench out to be standing there… Oh yeah, that is where it goes. It’s taking so long I almost forgot :-)
    8 points
  5. Celebrated 49 years with this pretty girl yesterday, now what to do when the big 50 comes
    8 points
  6. Here is how you tote stuff when you can only lift 30 pounds at a time. I made progress on the wall next to the tool cabinet this morning.
    8 points
  7. Amen Coop. I did manage to get the cleats on the jig wall yesterday by using a variety of MacGyver methods. Due to all sorts of unexpected things, the appearance of COVID not the least of them, the new shop build has taken way longer than I could have ever expected. This means things have been moved around, moved again, and again. I have jigs in all sorts of places and will experience a Christmas-like effect as I stumble across them now that I am finally moving in. The point of all that is that this pic shows jigs that I will keep on this wall and others that are just for example as I do not use them regularly. I just threw up those that I could lay my hands on easily to demonstrate what I am trying to do here. This wall is perpendicular to the tablesaw and router table area.
    8 points
  8. Got help to dolly the DP into the shop. the rest can be moved in small pieces so I'm good with that. One more piece of the puzzle done . . .
    7 points
  9. My Grandparents-in-law (is this a typically way to describe this?) live in an odd house that is slab on grade and concrete block walls. The doors that were installed when it was built are also odd. They are a very thin 3 panel door and do little to protect against cold winter weather. They requested a new door, initially i was going to look into a pre-hung and slide it in the existing opening. That was a no-go as the opening is an odd size and no standard available door will fit. Also it's concrete block with no room to expand the opening. So being a good grandson by marriage, I offered to make a new door to fit the opening. Chosen wood is Western Red Cedar. I can buy rough sawn from Menards, It's like Lowes or HD but green. If you don't have experience with the store they have an outdoor lumber yard that you can drive strait up to the pile and load from. It's a wonderful convenience not considering their prices are usually 11% lower . To get the door to the thickness i wanted. I ended up ripping 1_7/8" wide strips and edge gluing them together. The long stiles ended up being around 6.5" wide. I went a bit wider than normal to make sure the lock set would fit between the panel portions. It also made the panel dimensions easier to cut from the lumber lengths without huge waste. The rails were constructed in the same manner. Once all the rough material was glued, using tightbond 3 because exterior, I jointed and planed everything down. The finished thickness is 1_3/4" because that's what the window is calling for. After making everything strait and square i cut in grooves for the door panels. I did this at the table saw flipping the board so the panel is perfectly centered. I squared the grooves with a chisel and installed weather striping. This will keep the panel centered in the door, allow for expansion and contraction, but also prevent drafts around the panel. Probably overkill but it was easy and inexpensive. For the rails the groove was cut the same way but was able to be cut through. I miss judged the panel size and groove depth so I ended up having to use 2 layers of weather striping to fill the extra groove. Once the grooves were figured out I laid out joinery. For this I'm doing floating M&T joinery. I used multiple plunges lined up to make a 2.5" wide mortise that was 50mm deep. Mortise stock is 12mm. The only deviation is the bottom rail. I made that rail 9" wide and figured I should split the tenon into two and make them a bit larger. So there I went with two 1.5" wide mortises. Joinery complete, raised panel next. I started by gluing flat sawn material to make 2 panels that were not the size I wanted them to be.... oh well. I was making the door larger than I needed it and was goign to cut it to size on site. Now I'll just have less material to cut off on site. I was able to shift the top and bottom rail to account for the reduced panel size. I used the dado stack to fit the panel to the groove. After that was complete I wanted to do some sort of raised look but was getting stumped on how to do it. Then i remember that you can tilt the table saw arbor. I tilted the blade to 30 degrees. adjusted the blade height, adjusted the fence and cut a simple bevel. I didn't have a spare plate for zero clearance. The stock plate wouldn't work. So pucker factor at 11 I want forward. It went smoothly. I kept my hands near the miter slot, so far away from the blade. It also wasn't a through cut and there was no off cut to become a missile. You can see the profile created at the top of the image below. I forgot to take a picture of the panel after sanding before assembly. I'm going to have to keep this technique in the back of my mind as it worked really well. I like the results. After this was door assembly. This involved glue (Titebond 3), clamps (parallel 36" type), a hammer, and swearing. So a typical assembly. After assembly comes window but that was on order so the door sat in my shop for a week while I waited. I had yard work and a shed to organize so I took a break. Window came. Size was larger than I expected. I thought I ordered a 22" x 36" window. It ended up being a 24" x 37" window. I never knew how these assemblies worked so here is a picture of the window with half the frame removed. I took measurements and cut the opening a bit larger. Once done the window fit like a glove. I love how the cedar turned out. Cutting staves and gluing them so the wood was all vertical grain leaves an awesome effect. I wish I'd done the same with the panels so they matched. I'm not entirely sure how I'm going to finish the inside of the door. The outside face will be pained for sure but I'm on the fence if I wanted to do a clear coat on the inside or paint it. I'm leaning clear coat finish, they will be proud of the door and will likely show it off. If it's painted it won't look like much. More to come. I still need to finish prep, finish, and hang the door.
    7 points
  10. I experienced a very unusual sort of 'kick-back' today. Ripping a rough edge from a board about 18" long. The off-cut was NOT trapped between the blade and fence. When the cut was complete, the waste had enough drag on the blade to slide backwards a bit, as they sometimes do. However, it was thin enough to drop into the slot of the throat plate, where it grabbed, and swung upward with enough force to give me a good stinging whack across the forearm. Then it continued into the saw, where it jammed the blade and made the throat plate jump out of its recess, before I could hit the switch. This is the perfect argument for using a zero-clearance insert, which I had been avoiding, so as to keep more air flow around the blade for dust collection. Lucky it did no real damage to me or the saw, but it certainly got my attention!
    6 points
  11. Well, I finished it and took your advice, @gee-dub. I put stretchers at the bottom and top and then used 2 layers of 3/4" plywood on top. I think it turned out pretty good. For those curious I used spax hardwood/mdf screws. I would definitely do rabbets on the walls and top and bottom next time.
    6 points
  12. I've been needing to clean out and organize my shed since i had to scramble to sheet rock the garage. I finally made the time to do it and wow what a difference. I didn't take a before picture but lets just say there was an isle for the lawn mower and nothing else. With it clean I have to stop saying I have no space to store a riding lawn mower. I can easily open up both shed doors and drive my ATV inside. In my cleaning i found a place to store all those miserable cases handheld power tools come in. They eat SOOOO much space and i can't bring myself to throw them away. I know i should just stick them on facebook for sale but all the effort and minimal gains leaves me keeping them or if i get sick of them sticking them in the trash can. Right now they will live in the shed attic.
    6 points
  13. Well, I started working on it and for some reason I focused in on a feature of your wood that seemed a bit odd to me, but I found a sample of "teak" that has it so was very pleased with myself until I realized that it really wasn't teak at all but rather an obscure wood (Baikiaea plurijuga) that has "Rhodesian teak" as one of its common names. Also that wood really doesn't have a face grain that is a close match for your wood. SO ... no joy so far Just FYI, the feature I was looking at is what appears to be "diffuse in aggregates" parenchyma (broken up banded parenchyma) but that seems unusually regular for diffuse in aggregates. Here's your wood with an example of the feature circled and then the same thing on the "teak" piece SO ... back to square one. EDIT: I realize this post doesn't tell you anything useful, I just put it up to show what a PITA this wood ID can be and to further excuse my long delay in getting to this.
    6 points
  14. Cl That is with a wood cleaner coat (that will evaporate). It shows what the finish will look like.
    6 points
  15. I unloaded the plane till so it could be moved. It is depressing to see this much dust on these things. Not that they don't normally get dusty . . . it's just that this is the wrong kind of dust ;-) These cleats will be hidden by the fixture. You can see that they have been used and re-used a few times. Helpful tip for aligning sections of cleat when a single piece is not used. There is cleat material running the full width of this fixture.
    6 points
  16. Finished morticing the rails, and leveling them with the legs. I didn't take pics of the joints, because they look like a beaver made them. A very OLD beaver...
    6 points
  17. Picked up the Rockler dust collector expanding hose and the swivel connector for it. With my little Jet dust collector it needs a swivel so it doesn't get tippy. Nice to replace the early 90s hose that seems like it was a gutter drainage pipe.
    5 points
  18. Continuing on... This is the hardware I am using to attach the side boards to the legs each part sets flush in a sallow mortise and attaches with screws. I'm thinking it will be easier to rout the mortises for the hardware before gluing the legs to the foot board panel section. I have been working mainly on the foot board at this time, but as with some of the other steps it seems to make sense to do the mortises in all four legs and the two side boards at the same time. So first up was prepping the side boards. After milling them flat I need to rip them to width and cut them to final length. My shop doesn't have the space to do this on any of the stationary equipment, so I am using the track saw. Cleaned up one edge and the ripped to width. After ripping the two sides I was able to pretty up both edges on the jointer. This was the set up for cutting to length. I used my shorter track along with the TSO guide rail square. I made up a jig to cut the mortises along with the plunge router and a 1/2 long pattern bit. Then leaving the jig in place as a guide I cleaned up the corners with a chisel. And the fit. The legs were pretty much the same process. The leg fit. I do have one more step to do on the legs.
    5 points
  19. Decided to go with butcher block oil, then Howard's bees/carnuba wax. This is the first coat of butcher block oil. I think it will be amazing.
    4 points
  20. Got the drum sander in. It is surprising how much abrasives weigh if you get enough of them in a small footprint.
    4 points
  21. Hi Folks, my name is Mark and I'm the maker of the EZtension gauge. On blade thickness, Mick S. is right that blade thickness changes the amount of pressure required to reach "proper" tension. The EZtension gauge was designed for .025 blades for the 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2-inch wide blades and .30 for the 5/8 and .035 for the 3/4. -mj
    4 points
  22. So sad!! Chicago recently lost a young female officer (29 yr old Ella French) during a traffic stop she had two young children. Both ends of the age spectrum and both, like to many others, are so tragic These really hit close to home for me and my wife as our youngest daughter is an FBI agent working violent gangs in Chicago and previously was a Michigan State Police officer.
    3 points
  23. Thanks for all the compliments. But @Mark J brings up the real question; Well my wife is very easy going but she did have some feedback on this project, because I was hoping to parlay this into a matching loveseat build. If you guys remember her one request for the loveseat was being able to sit while leaning her back on the arm and having her feet on the loveseat. So this couch was a trial run for that project. Well she does love the couch, but the arm is too low for her to lean against it. I scooped it out and shaped it so putting a pillow there and leaning against it is comfortable, but it is too low and does not give her enough back support. So before I start the matching loveseat I have some thinking and designing to do. I'm thinking of a way to "wrap" the back, or extend the back to the one side she would lean against and just do the same arm as the couch on the other side. Or simply make the arm higher so there is more support. I'm not sure but it's these challenges that make this hobby so fun. I had enough foresight to buy enough of the fabric for the loveseat when the couch was upholstered.
    3 points
  24. I find the drill press much less nerve-wracking than a screaming router, for hogging out waste from a vessel like this. Once the middle is roughly hollowed, I added some spacers to offset the center from the edges when I re-attached them. Takes a good deal of force to close the gap. Guess my bandsaw kerf is a little wider than optimal. While the glue dried, I worked on parts for the suspension shelf to hold the tray. A dovetail is much better than just driving a screw. I hate to rely on fasteners alone, but I want this part of the structure to be removable, without leaving any visible sign. We'll see how this works out.
    3 points
  25. The face side of the beads is a different matter. If I had thought about order of operations, I would have rounded the corners first. But I rushed, didn't think, snd made a boo-boo. Time for CA and sawdust! After a little carving of the groove, it isn't so bad. The color going on this piece should hide that pretty well. Moving along, I started cutting to "cock-beaDing" that goes around the legs. I put a 45* block on a bench hook to help, but these thin pieces were pretty simple to cut. Since my marking knife won't fit in that groove, I use the marking pin stored in my combo square to punch a mark for the inside of the miter, then take it out of the groove and mark witb a knife. A sharp pull saw can really take a fine cut! So, here is the cock-beading in place. No glue yet, so the tape helps to avoid losing any small bits. Here is what the lower shelf looks like with legs attached.
    3 points
  26. My son in law, his brother and a couple of friends helped me move everything. My lumber got moved a couple of times; that was no fun either time. As to storage, this was a sore spot for a long time but I have gotten over it . The delay of the shop caused a reverse domino effect delaying work in the backyard and some home remodeling. My machines, tools and materials have been in one of three outbuildings on the property, in a large trailer on the property and in the 3 car garage. With the shop near-done I am moving what I can from everywhere . So much stuff has been inaccessible for so long, every day has started to feel like Christmas. I have lost count of how many times I have said "there that is!" and "I knew I had that!" in the last week. I hope to get the all clear (weight limit on lifting following minor eye surgery) this coming week so we can move the big stuff in. Things should move rapidly toward making sawdust after that
    3 points
  27. Cody and I made our annual pilgrimage to the 'Archaeofest', held at Pinson Mounds State Park to commemorate the culture of the Woodland-period people that built the mounds. The event was subdued, between Covid concerns and rain. Still interesting. Oh, and it is just 2 miles from my home.
    3 points
  28. Ya done good my friend, but I feel so sad for that model you rented for this pic., I'm gonna call your wife.
    3 points
  29. Partial shipment of my Christmas present! This was a filler to use the rest of the gift card and I think I am going to like it. It does a nice job of fitting the cap iron screw on both my Veritas replacement sets and my Lie-Nielsen planes. Kinda cool!
    3 points
  30. A few minutes free this morning, so I ripped some pieces for trim. I don't use a special jig, just a sacrificial push block that supports the off cut, and a featherboard. Using my smallest roundover bit, I radiused both edges of each strip. Fence required, as these were thin enough to slip under the bearing. The result. These will be ripped to width, most of them fitting into the grooves around the top end of each leg.
    3 points
  31. What part of the country do you live? After 50yrs I doubt it is going to get much worse as long as you protect it from the elements. I bought mine in 1976, and didn't do anything with it until about 20yrs ago. It was either in storage or hanging out in my garage. I honestly don't remember what finish I put on it but I suspect it was Danish oil, since that was my preferred finish at the time. If you are concerned about the large crack you could butterfly it in a couple of places. That edge is going to be really hard to finish. If I was going finish mine today, I would brush epoxy on edge and inside the large voids. Then I would finish the top and bottom with Osmo Polyx. It is really durable and easy to apply. It is really too bad that you don't have a place in your house for it. But finished with a base the right person will pay a small fortune! Ours is about 4' x 2' it a root burl, and we paid $75.00 for it. I was offered $3k not to long ago.
    3 points
  32. I get a new filter every other year with a cleaning every six months. Just a personal decision but with my chronic sinus issues it really helps (or at least in my head it works who actually knows).
    3 points
  33. I was pleased with the way they came of the saw, but they have been sanded. A couple things went into this. I wanted the top panels of both the foot board and head board to have sort of a recessed look the the top drawer of the night stands. If you look at the last picture of my first post about the bed, the dry fit picture, the two top panels are resawn and book matched and the grain sort of follows the grain and curve of the top rail. Hope that makes sense.
    3 points
  34. @Chestnut, agree and I'm pleased that the look is not heavy handed or bulky. It's a lot less imposing of a couch than the one it replaced, and I think this makes the whole room look less cluttered. @Chet, couldn't agree more with that statement. It really puts the custom in custom furniture and it's a benefit of being able to design and build your own. A few thoughts on the seating. I've had the opportunity to sit on the couch for a few days and the upholstery guy used extra firm cushions for the seat and med firm for the back. I almost wish the seat cushions were a little less firm, but not a game changer. I also think I could have increased the angle slightly (rake or pitch) of the seat. Basically this is referring to the drop from front to back in the seat, I could have increased that drop. The angle of the back to the seat could have also been increased slightly. I discussed this with the upholstery guy and we even tried an angled or wedge cushion for the back cushion, but I didn't like that. The softer back cushion does effectively increase the recline angle slightly since when you sit the back cushion gives. So overall I think it sits well, but I'm going to make a few slight tweaks in the loveseat. I may even tweak this couch. Because I'd think it would benefit from more drop, front to back, I may cut off an inch off all the back legs on this couch. This is the quick and easy way to increase the rake.
    2 points
  35. Sometimes my career and hobby collide.
    2 points
  36. I'm throwing away the standard insert. I've seen pieces go down beside the blade, but nothing ever came of them, other than aggravation to get them out. A good excuse to end the possibility.
    2 points
  37. 2 points
  38. I have done the same, using an insert specific for 45* bevel cuts, returning the blade back to 90* without changing the insert back to the zci. Then cutting an off cut that dropped down into the blade and getting a non injurious kick back. It only took once as I wasn’t wearing safety glasses and the piece clipped my ear. Glad you are ok.
    2 points
  39. Congrats to you both that's awesome!! In this world where its become so easy to walk away its awesome to see a couple thrive in their commitment to each other!
    2 points
  40. Recall that the bench includes a "valet tray" for keys, wallet, etc... Still pondering the tray support structure, and I need the tray to help visualize. So, guess what's next? I have this rough blank of cherry. The tray will be oval, and rather like a shallow bowl. Taking a page from the bandsaw box maker's book, I cut the blank apart, so I can shift sections and re-glue, to gain depth. That's all for now. Maybe more tomorrow!
    2 points
  41. Beading on the bottom shelf wasn't as clear cut as the legs. Rather than try to set the V bit up in my table again, I put it in my trim router and took another pass. I also radiused the corners, just using a hand-held belt sander. Not being comfy with routing around those corners on edge, I use hand tools to carry the bead around.
    2 points
  42. Baby steps . . . the hydraulic table has already paid for itself in the past. It is way ahead now ;-) With the DP Wall Cab in the new shop I updated the build thread (bottom of the linked page) if anyone is interested or missed it.
    2 points
  43. The best wood is the one you like the look of and enjoy working with. The 2nd best wood is the one that you don't mind how it looks and you can afford. It's a difficult question to answer as the wood you like the looks of, I might hate. There are also some woods that are better for some places (outdoors). In general any wood that has a relative janka hardness (750+) is more than durable for interior household work. Softer woods will work but may ding or dent easily. Availability is a huge consideration. I could say Black Walnut is the best but if you live in New Zealand, you'll probably never get your hands on much.
    2 points
  44. Wishing you a quick recovery @gee-dub sounds like all went well, glad you’re ok and back to 100% in short order
    2 points
  45. The first thing I do with those kinds of tool cases is throw them away. Most of them take someone smarter than me to get the tool back in them anyway.
    2 points
  46. I like those connectors, I've used them several times . What I liked most about them, is if you cut your mortise a 32nd deeper for both male and female parts, you get a really tight joint that's solid, and it's still able to come apart if you have to break it down to move it.
    2 points
  47. Anywhere in California we would be calling it under water year.
    2 points
  48. Your log didn't looktoo big. I didn't really notice milling to become slow until I was over 26" wide. Moving the material prepping etc always takes longer. I need to get a skip for my 48" bar setup. I always buy fresh gas the day i mill. For a larger higher value / higher performance saw the minimal cost is nothing compared to downtime. I also usually use enough that my other 2 stroke equipment can burn the stale gas between milling sessions. My leaf blower and string trimmer are indifferent to fuel age. I swear i had gas in my string trimmer for 3 years. Can you get enthaol free premium? You have power equipment and you didn't set the log with a down hill slant? Elevating the log so you can just let gravity do most of your feeding is the best advice I've ever received for milling. I never lay my logs flat if i can help it. It also helps airflow around the log to keep dust out of the saw, and exhaust out of your face. I also usually try and mill on windy & cool days. Some photos of my setup. I use shop made wedges from leg taper cut offs. Beats paying for the uber expensive stihl branded ones and i have a good 2 dozen. Smaller log on driveway. U used support on both ends to get out of the dust. This is what my homemade brace looks like. It's held around 500 lbs or half of a 1,000 lb log. I've been meaning to make it a bit nicer and sturdier just haven't gotten around to it.
    2 points
  49. Project left the shop today, wrapped it in moving blankets, loaded on a hand truck and up 2 flights of stairs it went with a bit of wifely assistance. Few more trips up and down with drawers, internal parts, plus an impact driver and about 3 dozen brass screws for the back boards. 20 minutes of final assembly and I call this one done. Color looks a little different outside the shop, I've got those 5 or 6k bulbs in the shop.
    2 points