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  1. ABC News did a piece on the need for students desks and chairs (Marc's design) for use at home during the Covid school closures. A woodworker here in Santa Fe , David Gunter saw it and took on himself to start making them. The local media got hold of it and it's mushrooming. The Fine Woodworking program at Santa Fe Community College where I teach has become involved and will be contributing dozens if not more desks and chairs. ABC News will be doing a human interest spotlight on it tonight. This is a terrific cause if anyone else wants to get involved on a local basis. Here's a link
    9 points
  2. Felt good to have some shop time, and to finally make more headway on this project. Just need to cut the french cleat and hang it now.
    6 points
  3. Hi folks - my woodworking time is nearly non-existent these days since the birth of our identical twin boys in June. They are doing great, and no, we're not getting any sleep yet. I thought I'd scratch the itch a little by writing up a shop tour post. If you've been on the forum a while you may have seen some of the work I've put in to get where I am with my current shop today: I went from this: My detached garage, prior to stuffing it full of all the stuff that didn't get unpacked in the house, along with all of my stationary tools. Through this: It was n
    6 points
  4. I built two of these for a friend and just finished them today. They're about 10" x 13" x 2" and made of Walnut, finished in Nitrocellulose lacquer. The frame holds an 8x10 photo. David
    6 points
  5. As if this project has not been progressing slow enough already, I need to put it on hold to do some other stuff for the house. BUT, at least it almost actually looks like a table now!
    6 points
  6. 78" long x 24" deep x 42" high, mostly 3/4 red oak 8/4 legs all drawers are box jointed, with 5/8" poplar for the interior drawers. The interior webbing is all red oak. I didn't use dowels, I went M/T for joinery. And there's no one I know that can pick it up. It takes 2 to lift one end all the way. One can get it off the carpet, but no for long.The back is rabbetted in with 5/8" Baltic birch
    6 points
  7. Took down a troublesome tree by the house today. Root system is contributing to cracks in the foundation. Sad, because I planted it as a sapling about 27 years ago. Took almost 3 hours to fell with my little 33cc Homelite. That is just not enough power for a 16" bar, and I had to cut from each side, even near 20' up the bole. Only 8' of clear material here. Gonna try to slice it up and dry it, because, why not? Oak is some tough stuff. Even with Cody pulling it with my truck, and me driving wedges into the back cut, the crazy tree held on to almost 25* of incline before this li
    6 points
  8. Hard to believe that in a couple of days it will be 3 months. I promised Alison's son that I would make him a cremation urn. He'll be up here the first of October. By then the Osmo should be cured and ready to buff out. Jarrah, mesquite, ebony, jelutong, black palm, turquoise. She always loved David Marks' Sensei, so I used it for a concept to make this.
    5 points
  9. First rainy day in a long time here, so I couldn't find anything better to do than to go back to work on the rental house floor. It's a bad job by myself, but looks like that's the way it will be for a while. Every piece requires getting up and down off the floor more than once. I got the hall finished, and am going into the big living room. I have the two bedrooms at the end of the hall done, and their big walk-in closets. Still have the other two bedrooms to do, off either side of the hall. I had been dreading the angled meeting of the slate floor in the entryway, but it went right
    4 points
  10. Dang, I bet that was some frantic digging too! Seems like you got out mostly unscathed except I'm sure the bill from the plumber. Just got back from picking up a decent chunk of wood from a local guy who was clearing out his shop. No real plans for it, but for $50 the 14 board feet of semi-curly soft maple was a deal. With the rest of the curly maple, some walnut and cherry thrown in I think I made out okay. I guess some boxes or picture frames are in my future with some of the 18" long curly maple pieces.
    4 points
  11. State of my house this morning - Foundation repairs under way. Of course, the main water line is between 2 of the holes, and we heard water running about 15 minutes after the crew left. So I spent the next 4 hours digging this out: The plumber had to install the offset because of how much tension was on the line from movement when they started jacking up the house. I hated to call a plumber for a simple pipe joint, but no DIY plumbing job I have ever attempted has gone well, and the local hardware store was closing, anyway.
    4 points
  12. said the hell with it and ordered a 6" Freud set. Waiting for ebay seller to respond to my request to return the bad set.
    4 points
  13. OK, I'll say it before anyone else does . . . Watch Christian Becksvoort. Dados for dividers and dovetails for tops and bottoms is a tried and true construction method. If you're not into the dovetails, rabbets, dowels or hidden mechanical fasteners can work. You can also make your feet into posts and frame them in using mortise and tenons for the joinery. This dresser is pretty stout and has been moved twice to new homes. Even with the drawers out two guys and a dolly are preferred to lugging this beast. No failures.
    4 points
  14. Back at it. I've done about as much research as I could do. Now it's time to put things on paper. Started with a flat line representing a flat surface the legs will sit on. From there I transferred the heights of all the significant parts to the chair- seat, arm, and back of chair. These heights are marked in relation to the line and this is where I start. I also have lengths for the back leg/arm support, front leg, and backrest support. Also have the angles, from there got to this; A few key measurements here- you want the backrest to be parallel to the front leg.
    4 points
  15. I have not been able to work out in the garage the last few weeks due to the heat and smoke so today I decided to go out and clean up the garage so I could play with my Domino. I moved my workbench and found this 5 gallon bucket of pencils. It turns out my wife brought them home 2 weeks ago and hid them out there for me to find. She was at her Grandma's house helping her clean out a shed so she can sell her house and found it. It belonged to he grandpa who was a brick mason. I am not sure what to do with them. I may donate a bunch to the local 0Habitat for Humanity store.
    4 points
  16. I like the contrast between Cherry and ash. It's not overpowering and it works very well together. Heres' a table set I made that are Cherry and Ash, and now reside in a home in Louisiana. Both have floating tops.
    4 points
  17. I have 24 kitchen cabinet doors I have to make, I will send you the dimensions.
    4 points
  18. More progress on the vanity Hung and fit the doors and added stop blocks Then stained it Also got the bar doors glued up. Have I mentioned that these Dubuque clamps are quickly becoming my favorites Also got the blinds hung ...and finally we took the popper for its maiden voyage...very good! Really glad I put the vent fan in above it too.
    3 points
  19. And wipe down the wood surface with mineral spirits to check for marks before applying finish.
    3 points
  20. I believe we got bumped for coverage of RBG's personal trainer doing pushups beside her casket. Oh well, maybe next week. Nicole posted on the WWG Facebook page that this project will be the WFC project this year.
    3 points
  21. It sounds like I need to talk to Fuji. The only thing I can think of changing now is going to a bigger tip, even though the chart included with the sprayer says to use a 1.0 or a 1.3. That will have to wait now because my paint supplier offered to let me have one of his reconditioned spray systems, make sure it is working for us, and not have to pay for 12 months. It's a $3000 (new) system for $1200. The gun alone costs $800. Merkur 15. It's working great so far.
    3 points
  22. I don't see how the weight has much of an influence on the performance of joinery? I've made a large dresser as well and used all floating mortise and tenon joinery and it is more than strong enough. A lot of this depends on construction method and design. If you were planning on making a modern style where there aren't dust frames and the drawers are attached with ball bearing drawer slides. Making the box with a plywood back that is attached with screws like Richard's would be very strong. Dowels where the top and bottom meets the side would offer a lot of strength. My Roubo style
    3 points
  23. Thank's Mark, I'm guessing that there are things with this new format that still require some nudging. To respond to his question: I didn't use a pore filler, instead I used 600 grit for the surfaces prior to finishing, and I wiped the surface clean, rather than using my compressor, allowing the dust to remain in place, then held in place with Danish oil, then several coats of poly.
    3 points
  24. No problem, at my age I miss a lot, especially my youth.
    3 points
  25. Thank you! It is nice to know where most everything is and know it's all largely useable when spare moments come available. I have a strong distrust of people and entities in power (regardless of elephant or donkey affiliation) so the political differences don't trouble me. Both my staunchly left and right-leaning friends and family have lots to say though haha. The move itself was a logistical mess. Our stuff was split between home and a storage unit an hour from our house, and at the time we both traveled a fair amount for work. I had to move all of my tools, lumber (dumbbbb...sho
    3 points
  26. Oh it gets better. We actually have 2 HOAs, one for the town and one for our neighborhood. Ours is actually pretty relaxed. My wife was the president last year before she got tired of the work. Most people in our neighborhood have a couple of violations but nothing ever gets said, it's more to avoid trash piling up and pink front doors. Funnily enough, our current HOA President just had her deck stained and it doesn't meet code so I can do whatever I want unless she wants to redo hers too.
    3 points
  27. 3 points
  28. I found it not to be intuitive. there is a bit of a learning curve but, there are lots of videos to help you. I would cut a bunch of scrap to width and length and try to make good rectangles with smooth butt joints. Going through a few of those will really give you a feel for the ways to register the tool. You can knock the poor ones apart and re-do them with a different tenon location so, good practice, minimal cost and no lost dominoes.
    3 points
  29. Made some more progress on the doors and drawer fronts First I set up for the crosscuts, I used blue tape on the stiles to insure I didn't inadvertently cut them. With those done I moved on to the cheeks, The new jig worked great Then it was time to mill up panels I also got the door panels glued up and got the two panels for the vanity stained so I can spray them in the morning and glue up the doors later in the day.
    3 points
  30. I decided to build a pre-separator for my Festool CT15 to see if I can make the bag and filter last longer. I got the idea from a picture I found searching on google. This orange part is a Duststopper from Home Depot. It attaches to a bucket I cut down that will be recessed and attached to the box lid. The box for the separator is 6.8 gallons. I did not want to permanently attach it so I made adapter flange that sits over the vacuum and the separator drops into. Next is lots of sanding to get it ready for painting.
    2 points
  31. My favorite smoothing plane is a DW735. When the blade(s) get dull, I order more.
    2 points
  32. All I can say is that sawyers don't get paid enough... Can I get an 'Amen' out of @Spanky?
    2 points
  33. It’s for my wife to store her quilting thread spools and bobbins. The brass pins are to keep them organized and in place, and can keep a spool with bobbin of matching thread together. I’ll take another pic when it’s in place and in use.
    2 points
  34. Use a scraper as your final tool.
    2 points
  35. Good way to really find out what tools you need for you personal work flow.
    2 points
  36. Yeah, I'm glad today's crew is led by Juan. I got to familiar with Manuel yesterday. Manuel Labor, that is... Between removing gravel from the flowerbeds and digging out that pipe, I think I shoveled close to 5 tons of material.
    2 points
  37. I can't speak to Ross's soil, but here in Middle Tennessee, we have clay for soil. In lower valley's the soil looks great, but in the flatter areas, ..clay. 75% of the private homes that were built here before the 1990's were clay brick, and still standing. There are older neighborhoods with nothing but brick homes. In order to get a good garden space, $$$$$$ for compost, manure anything that will build soil. I use all that plus Sheet composting. Which is a 6", 8" or 10" layer of leaves spread over your garden space in the Fall when the leaves fall and let Ma Nature break them down
    2 points
  38. Back on topic, I don't know how I forgot to include this but our HOA runs a woodshop. In non-covid times I can go pay $16 or $20 and get access to a fully stocked woodworking shop complete with almost anything you could need. They even run classes there you can register for.
    2 points
  39. I used contact cement to lay a piece of leather, smooth side down on a scrap of some kind of wood, then used green compound on the rough side. It does a great job.
    2 points
  40. +1 To stropping. I find that MDF scraps with green (aluminum oxide?) compound are great for this. HF sells the compound pretty cheap.
    2 points
  41. That's been a nice side effect of the pandemic. I was able to get 6 coats of finish done over the last 2 days since I'm working from home. If not it would have taken me 3-5 days to get it done. I forgot to say in my first post, congrats on the kids! Hope you're all adjusting well and everyone is staying healthy!
    2 points
  42. Sharp blade, shallow cut, tight mouth. Biggest hurdle is watching grain direction. If there is any swirl at all, the direction will switch on you and allow tear out. And unless you have a premium FAS straight grained stock, oak will have swirl. Go slow and switch to a scraper for troublesome spots.
    2 points
  43. Agreeing with Frank about the full cure time, I would suggest waiting at least a couple weeks before buffing it out. Buffing works better when the finish is hard.
    2 points
  44. well done sir! and now to find the time to make stuff, it can be done, we had 4 kids and when shop time came it was just that much better
    2 points
  45. Yeah, but you know how much he likes woodworking, that means he's still in the tunnel.
    2 points
  46. I hadn't considered that, I'm sure it would work. The Crikut is also pretty cool, but at least around here not all that different in cost from the most basic laser cutters. I'm still interested in cutting veneer and thin materials if I can. I will fully admit, I've also just always wanted a laser, but they've been way out of reach until recently. I'm in the midst of home renos for a bit, so I'm not doing much in the shop aside from cutting plywood. I'm trying to figure out if I'm ordering anything that's going to take 8 weeks to get here, so I'll have something to play with when I'
    2 points
  47. Very interesting design, but it does look surprisingly simple. I think you can easily figure this out without plans. I wouldn't worry too much about stool hieght, height will be determined by counter height. Typical counter height of 35-37" calls for stool height around 24-26", bar height of 40-42" calls for stool height 29-31". Grain orientation should be carefully considered for the legs, but if you have good grain orientation I think you will be fine. I would consider adding strechers, esp if you are going with the higher stool height. I don't think it will detract from the design too
    2 points
  48. Take a sample piece of each type of wood you have, sand them, then wipe them with a little mineral spirits to simulate finish and see what you like.
    2 points
  49. Finished the construction on the bar doors and drawers now finishing begins
    2 points
  50. 2 points