Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/17/21 in Posts

  1. Today, I harvested the first fruits of a walnut tree that I have been nurturing for almost 25 years. The 'grandparent' of this tree grew in a wooded area of my grandfather's property, adjacent to the house where I grew up. When I was about 10 years old, my grandparent's rented a small house on this property to a family with a couple of boys near my age. I recall us spending a few great summers, roaming around the 'wilderness' where my grandfather had once raised cows. We built a 'fort' from driftwood collected along a small stream that flowed through, fished in the lake that the stream emptied into, and tamed the wild frontier with our lever-action Daisy BB rifles. On a hot summer day, nothing could quence our thirst like a long drink of the cold, clear springwater that flowed from the roots of that old walnut tree. We even relied on that spring for drinking water during the great ice storm of '74, when power was out for more than two weeks, and a tray of ice Dad left in the kitchen sink didn't melt for that entire time. Sometime after the renters moved on, my grandfather collected some nuts from that walnut, and managed to get a couple growing in his back yard. After building my current home, he gave me a wheel barrow full of nuts from one of those trees. He passed away in 1999, so that must have been '97 or '98. Anyway, I left a pile of those nuts outside, so the outer hulls would dry up and be easier to clean off. A few were forgotten, and the next spring, five little walnut trees had sprouted. I transplanted them to more favorable parts of my yard, and hoped they would grow. Over the years, one by one, they succomed to drought, poor soil, or being mowed over by accident. The sole survivor has died back at least three times, only to sprout anew the following spring. I have moved it a couple of times, finally locating to a spot that seems to work. After a couple of decades, it is finally taller than me, and healthy enough to produce nuts. The memories it brings to mind will always be more valuable than any lumber it could possibly produce.
    11 points
  2. Prior to building my Roubo Bench I had a bench made out of Noden Adjustable legs and a cheap top I bought at Woodcraft well after using this primarily as a glue up station for many years I have decided to change it up a bit. Earlier this year a purchased a couple of new vises; a pattern makers vice and also a gun stock vice I will mount them on this bench while continuing to use it as a glue up table. I need to beef it up a bit and also will add a till to the back side. Bench when I started Vises waiting for install First up I reduced the size of the top while squaring up all the edges. I used my Festool tracksaw and TSO track square to do this. Ultimately the bench will stay 30" deep and grow to 62" wide Next I sanded off the finish from both sides of the top Then I made a jig to cut the tenons on both ends, doing it this way insures the top and bottom will match. Routed the tenons wondered why the dust collection was so bad... Huh that might explain it Next I set up the Panotrouter for some box joints quick easy and strong I used dominoes to align the front skirt so I could get the length measurement This where I ended up tonight. Hoping to finish this week but we will see. I would like to get back to my chair build but want to use the vise for that so decided to knock this out quick.
    8 points
  3. No, not Depends. get your mind back in the shop . I have a small shorts issue. Maybe a medium shorts issue. OK, a definite shorts issue. I controlled this at the previous shop with my "shorts tower". I had selected the location for the tower in the new shop long ago. When things get tall where I live they get secured. When securing for earthquake you are not so much trying to hold the item up as you are trying to prevent it from getting the idea of leaning over as far as the tipping point. That is, keep it from rocking. Imagine my surprise when the location I picked on paper before the slab was even poured turned out to line up with the previous pocket-holes-into-studs I had used for this purpose at the old shop. What are the chances? The boxes are screwed together and secured to the wall every other box or so. As you can see these are made from scraps found, donated, roadkill, whatever was at hand. It finally ends up here and there's one more thing off my list.
    8 points
  4. Well, if I am down to caulking door trim and touching up paint I guess this journey is over. Thanks to everyone that tagged along, gave me ideas (knowingly or unknowingly), and encouragement. Anything that happens from here on will be considered an actual shop activity and will get its own thread if deserving. Thanks again!
    8 points
  5. Forgot to put the feet in the pic. You’re probably better off that I did. It finally got down to fire pit weather.
    8 points
  6. She’s an absolute beaut my friends! Still getting it all set and tuned up. Ended up getting the resaw king and a half inch blade for special purposes, have no idea what I’m going to use it for yet but by god I have it lol. Don’t mind the messy shop, doing some reorganizing and shuffling of equipment.
    7 points
  7. I just want to say I been very busy for a long time with Barbara,s care. Haven been here much because of it. I do feel good about I took care of her with no help except hospice near the end. I do need to keep it together and get back to work very soon. Plenty of time at night to get upset.. I want to thank everyone for what they have said and done and I really mean it guys.. I will see you guys later today after I get some things done.. Mark
    6 points
  8. Maybe worth posting - Dust Bin Bag Holder Thingy. My method to date for cyclone dust bin bag management has just been to keep an eye on it till enough spoil is in there to hold the bag well. With the DC out in a shed this would be problematic. Granted I am one of those that sometimes solves a problem no one has but, this has been planned for a couple of years. Finally . . . Measure the circumference of your barrel. Add about 6" for overlap. Measure the depth. I left it about an inch short in case any bag material or spoil got trapped under it. Grab your FRP panel that has been patiently waiting in the garage since 2019. Cut your strip to size. Test fit, clamp to hold position and mark for rivet positions. Grab that handy pop rivet kit you can't remember why you bought but use at least once a decade. This one is from Sears back when you could walk in, buy a discount tool, and expect it to work for awhile. I chose to use a washer on the inside of the rivet to provide more grip on the fiberglass panel. Drill a hole, push the rivet through, place the washer over it and cycle the tool. . . A post riveted test fit. I drilled a couple of holes on opposite sides of the fiberglass tube and slipped sections of rope through to act as handles. I failed to take a pic of this for some reason. Oh well, slip the tube into the bag and slip the whole rig into the barrel. . Wheel the new conglomeration out to the shed and install the barrel. . That's one more off the list!
    6 points
  9. Forgot to post this last weekend. Hung the shelves and got the lumber up and shop operational again. Now to finally start on that sideboard.
    5 points
  10. Picked up a a couple new bits to use on my current chair project
    5 points
  11. I used to have this same rig in my previous shop which was less than half the size. I moved the panel-shorts storage fixture in today. It is just a 2' x 4' box with angled sides. There is a full width divider left to right that yields two approximately 1' x 4' sections.
    5 points
  12. A plan is afoot, gentlemen. More news, soon.
    5 points
  13. Ok, jig is finished. Works really well with a 3/8" mortising bit, just need to fine tune the depth on the router.
    5 points
  14. Got the molding installed and the cove cut on the underside of the lid. Need to order another hinge from Horton as I only ordered 2
    5 points
  15. Broke down and milled 68BF of cherry as I begin my barn door build. May put a post in the project journal section when I have a few more pictures. Glad to be building again after a hiatus of nearly two years.
    4 points
  16. Sold my truck...Ford says the new one is going to be built on Nov 2 sure hope they don't let me down
    4 points
  17. So i had the blade mounted on the saw. I would just inspect each tooth of the blade on both sides to find anything that stuck out. When I found something I used a diamond plate and working with the plate parallel to the band would remove the protrusion. Make sure not to touch the front of the tooth or the narrow part as that is ground a specific way to keep the blade running true.
    4 points
  18. This is a great document of building a woodworking shop from scratch. It should be mandatory reading before any attempt to build. This thread is a gift to any woodworker. Thank you! Gee-dub Based on escalating commodity prices my guess you are over budget. If you are comfortable in allowing your total costs I think it would be helpful to anyone considering to build.
    4 points
  19. This has been driving me all damn day. Thank you Ross, and thank you Coop. This old man is going to bed. G'nite.
    4 points
  20. We think alike, did this one several years ago it was starting to get some color when I took this shot, yours is beautiful well done sir !
    4 points
  21. "Thats what she said"
    3 points
  22. Update: When four new batteries gave the same result, I began to suspect the charger. On a whim I wiggled a bit on a battery and put what I would consider was a substantial amount of force on it, and it seated. I think one of the three blades on the charger was out of alignment and was holding the batteries from seating. All seems normal now.
    3 points
  23. Mat60 is the member that lost his wife Sunday morning. he had a decent cabinet shop business. But when his wife got real sick, with a number of illnesses, he shut down his business to take care of the woman he's been in love with for 36 years. The only income he's had for the last two years has been her Social Security, and as some of you know, that money doesn't go very far. I and a couple of other folks here are trying to help as best we can. So I'm asking our group here if there's a way we can set up a "Go Fund Me" page to help him with cremation expenses. He's been paying the funeral home a little at a time and he needs a tad over $1,000 to get this done. In the mean time, he's been contacting some of his old customers to see if he can get his cabinet business back up and running. He isn't of age to collect Social Security, so he has no choices left to him. If anyone of you muggs can help in any way, like setting up a go fund me page, or donate, Let me know by a PM and I'll give as much info as I have to help this young man out. I'd appreciate it and I'm sure he will as well. Thanks guys. ...........Richard A
    3 points
  24. Functional, two hinges installed + soft close strut.
    3 points
  25. Yep, plus it leaves a bit of room for a thin bumper up front.
    3 points
  26. @coop, you can click this link , or copy & paste this text: https://gofund.me/c57923a2
    3 points
  27. You can see the doors on the floor, the farthest one away, the boards look like they are smaller and don't match up well. The boards were 30+ years old, some were 6", some 6 1/2" and some 5 1/2 ". I built the left door first, and was very careful to only use 6" boards. I got tired and careless and grabbed a stack of 5 1/2" boards to finish the "X" pieces on the right door. When I slid them together my heart dropped. i had to take that door apart and rebuild it with 6" boards. Somewhere I have pics of the doors hanging, they turned out well. They were very heavy, a good 100 pounds per side. I made small doors for two powder rooms. They loved them, they still haven't grown on me. If i can find the finished pics, I'll post them, Joe.
    3 points
  28. The most important thing is that the wood is stable. Construction layout won't make a lot of difference on a hanging door, as long as it's strong enough to stay together. One piece that twists, or moves sometime later will have an effect.
    3 points
  29. This is going to be a great project! Looking forward to watching as you work. Regarding the case miters, our friend @derekcohen has done a couple of very similar projects. Try searching his journals for some good tips on the construction. For the back, I would be very tempted to make frame & panel assembly to mimic the front. That avoids having an 'ugly side' that needs to go against a wall.
    3 points
  30. That is the one I have been looking at the most. Sometimes I get to thinking about the next "fun" project and get lazy with things like this. Then the next time I am in the middle of a project and in need of it the process starts all over.
    2 points
  31. +1 on a simple small chamfer. You could even use a block plane rather than a router.
    2 points
  32. Or maybe I'm overthinking this. Perhaps in incorporating the tongue and groove to allow for movement, I'll end up with some definition between boards?
    2 points
  33. All I see is a stack of end-grain butcher blocks....
    2 points
  34. He did! Thanks to both @RichardAand @wtnhighlander for your contributions. May Barbara Rest In Peace.
    2 points
  35. So, I've got two hinges mortised in and installed. Everything works nice, what about the gap? The leaves are flush with the surface, do I need to go deeper? Not much experience with hinging <g>.
    2 points
  36. Ross is a helluva guy. If anyone would like to help a woodworking member of our community, you can donate at this address: gofundme.com/f/bring-peace-to-barbara's family. Ross set this up as an experiment, and since it worked, we're gonna leave it this way. This will help our friend Mat60 Also known as Mark Mathews.
    2 points
  37. Made some more progress tonight, routed out the mortises for the breadboard ends also cut the other box joint on the the front so its complete. Tomorrow I will start on the back and the till section.
    2 points
  38. +1 A good blade and tuned bandsaw leaves a surprisingly good finish.
    2 points
  39. Don't limit it to just rough stock. It'll rip milled stock just as easily and quickly.
    2 points
  40. Yep, thought the same thing. One never knows when another little one might show up after spending 20 years getting rid of the first gen so maybe better safe than sorry. I'll add the strut just for the hell of it. Makings of a mortising jig for the lid. Raising the blade through a scrap of MDF for the back wall, scrap = to the thickness of the case side cut to the width of the hinge to guide the side cuts.
    2 points
  41. My barrel is 35 gallons. I got the short barrel since I didn't want to lift big barrels anymore. That was 15 years ago and now I don't want to lift ANY barrels anymore . I have a Bindicator that I have been intending to install for years. Now that the DC is finally out of view I will have to forge ahead with that
    2 points
  42. I agree, I would also use a track saw to make this miter cut.
    2 points
  43. That's a great looking sideboard, but when we're watching TV, I want the center of the screen right at eye height when we're sitting down. I don't want to look up at it.
    2 points
  44. I was suggesting to make the back look like the front, but if it will likely never be seen, that is a lot of effort for little reward. The plywood panels should do nicely. I was going to suggest that a 2x4 with stop blocks and wedges is a cheap way to deal with a unique clamping situation, but with lumber prices still being a bit steep, pipe clamps might be cheaper!
    2 points
  45. I have a slow close strut, two actually but I'll see how one does first
    2 points
  46. If that is a mess, I am really in trouble.....
    2 points
  47. 2 points
  48. Now that beats anything on TV IMO, we trade off with friends about twice a week to enjoy a fire, well done @Coop, temps going down to the 30’s this week sitting around a fire with great friends is the best !
    2 points
  49. Standing on it's feet, lid resting in place -no hinges yet.
    2 points
  50. Lots of putting things away and throwing things out so not a lot to show . . . that shows. Upped the jointer to 6". The difference in performance? Substantial!
    2 points