Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/20/21 in Posts

  1. Well many of you may remember I started this process awhile back. I wanted to redo the couch and sofa in our living room but was getting resistance from my wife, she was concerned about the comfort of these new pieces. Her main concern was the loveseat, it's where she mainly sits to read and watch the television. I knew I had some work to do to win her over. I started with the couch and shared that process with you last fall. Over the winter I got completely distracted with making fishing lures, but still was quietly plugging away at the design of the loveseat. Since it was going to have a wood frame I needed to figure out how to design it so the side she reclined on was comfortable enough for her. This took awhile and in the end I made an unique loveseat, where one side was designed differently than the other to hold a cushion in place. The construction was very similar to the couch but I changed a few things, mainly made the armrests higher, increased slightly the drop from the front to the back, went with softer seat cushions, and figured out how to add some vertical supports to the one armrest that would "hold" the cushion. The result was something that I was very pleased with and it is very comfortable, and most importantly I made my wife happy with the design. Here's a picture of the frame, sans the cushions; Here's a closer look at the armrest that holds the cushion; A quick shot with the seat cushions to show the difference in the armrests from side to side; And two final shots all assembled; So the conversion on the mid century modern look in my living room is almost complete. Now it's on to new endtables and a new coffee table. It's funny how one project can create others, but I'm not complaining.
    18 points
  2. This is number 41, and I have decided to call it “My Scars Are Me”. The name deserves a little explanation. I purchased the wood from an estate sale, so I don’t know what it is exactly. It was labeled Australian burr, but I’m given to understand that Australia is actually host to more than one species of tree. But it certainly is a burr with lots of bold swirling grain, as well as bark inclusions, knots and other defects large and small. As I began to work the wood I was at first concerned that the inherent defects would not only result in a frail piece, but would also preclude a silky smooth finish. As I pondered filling them with epoxy, I realized that all these features didn’t just make the wood visually more interesting, they were in fact what made the wood. They were the wood’s substance, what it was composed of. This piece of wood is, just as you, I and everyone are, the sum of its scars. It is the “slings and arrows” endured that have fundamentally been the niduses of our own creation. It measures 4 ½” x 9”. It’s sanded to P600 and there is one coat of Osmo Polyx-Oil satin.
    17 points
  3. I have been meaning to post pictures of this project for a while. I actually finished this in Feb. I was going to do a journal, but as I started to work it up I realized there wasn't much different in my process this time as compared to the last time that I journaled. Xenia is the Ancient Greek custom and practice of offering hospitality without hesitation, particularly to strangers. So here are some pictures: The base piece is made from Honduran mahogany and the basin is maple. The finish is Osmo Polyx-Oil satin.
    17 points
  4. Thank you all for your response to my post about wood movment for thsi table. You will see that I wnt with the option the created a gap in the frame around the top. This should eliminate the potential problems for movement. I built this table to be used as a place to show my Pennsylvania Spa\ice Cabinet. The most difficult part of the project is coming to an agreement with my wife and where to put it. Somewhat complicated by the presence of a Christmas tree. Here are some pics. Table is African Mahogany. My first project iwth this species - I like working with it. Merry Christmas to all.
    16 points
  5. I should have done a journal on this one but I get involved and forget. Anyway, this is my latest project. The detail work to at least as much time as the desk itself. I know that a couple of us have made shameless plugs for Marc Adadsm school of Woodworking and this deak is another. The design of the desk, joinery techniques, stringing and oval inlay, strining and finishing (sort of) were all the result of the school. The carving is a result of Mary May's online school. I think is all starting to come together. Desk is walnut 9Oh, my God - the price of walnut up here). Desk is 24" x 48" x 30" high. Joinery includes dovetail at each end of the front top rail to the legs, doulbe mortise and tenons for the face frame joints and dominoes for the side and back rails to the legs and between the pieces that make up the top. I use power tools to hog out the dovetails and mortises and pair to the scrib elines with chisels. The sides and back are frame and panel use 1/4" walnut veneer plywood (actually turned out to be just over 3/16) Tray for keyboard in place of center drawer. Not really a federal style feature but that's what was required. Legs were grroved to look like columns with base and cap of 1/4" half rounds in 1/8" grooves. Bottoms of 1 5/8" square legs are tapered 4 sides to 3/4" square. Cockbeading on drawers was new for me. top and bottm cock bead on each drawer cover the entire top ( or bottom) face edge while the side cock beading is much narrower so as not to cover up the dovetails. Carvings are a simple bracket design. Thank you Mary May. Top and vertical edges are mortised and tenoned to the frame to add stiffness. String and oval and bell flowers are mad of holly. The oval is 12 pieces of holly veneer cut out of a rectangle shape, sand shaded and then re-assembled and glued to 1/8" bacltic birch. Then I cut the final oval shape and applied the Holly border. Next I used double stick tape to hole it in place while I scribed around the oval. Finally routed it out and glued it in place String in the top for decoration. Stringin is 1/32" wide. I used a dremel tool with edge guide or circle cutting jig to make 1/32" wide x 1/16" deep grooves. Finish is Satin ARS over 2 coats of shellac. The body of the desk has 2 coats rag applied and the top has 5 coats applied with sponge brush and a lot of sanding in between coats to get the surface grain filled enough to be a decent writing surface That's about it. Thanks for reading.
    16 points
  6. As I haven’t seen Mel, @Llama, the self proclaimed reindeer king on here in a while, I thought I would start without him. Cherry Spalted Elm BB Ply And Walnut
    15 points
  7. I know that I haven't been very active on the forum lately but I have been in the shop. Here are a few pics of my completed project. And a hidden compartment. Next Project will be a table to set it on. Think I will incorporate Cabriole legs - something new each project. I'll try to look in on you guys more often.
    14 points
  8. This week I decided it was time to make a couple upgrades to my existing tool. First I replaced my 1950's Craftsman jointer with a new Grizzly 6" jointer. Then I I upgraded my crappy HF 8" drill press with a new 12" Grizzly drill press. I decided to mount it to my large Husky too box. To do this I had to move my spindle sander to my small Husky tool box. This is where I had my old drill press mounted. I originally put the new one on it but I decided it felt to unstable.
    14 points
  9. Alison's son asked if I would make a 32" lazy Susan for him to give to his aunt for her birthday. I'm in the high, dry desert of northern New Mexico and they live in hot, humid, Houston, so wood movement was a big concern. He sent me a link to a YT video of a maker making one out of construction lumber. I couldn't see doing that. I figured veneering would make more sense and remain much more stable. I resawed some walnut for the veneer. I remembered that Craig Thibodeau has a chapter in his book on veneering where he did a large starburst pattern. What do you know, his example was 32" in diameter. Saved me from doing the math. I made the template from ½" MDF to exact size. After rough cutting the shapes at the bandsaw, I sandwiched the veneers into a stack with the template on top and used the edge sander to sneak up on the line. They came out great and took no time at all. I laid them up on 1" (2 layers of ½") MDF with poplar veneer as a backer. I used Titebond Cold Press Veneer glue. Worked really well. I used a router on a shop made circle jig to cut it out. Then made a template from ½" Baltic birch, tweaking it by clamping a spare roll of drum sander paper to the circumference of the veneered panel. Dialed it in spot on. I used the Domino to align the top surfaces and banded it in 1 ¼" walnut. I used the circle jig again to cut the ⅛" inlay channel and sized some cherry down to a snug fit. Note - Sometimes planing the banding can be tricky if there's any wavy grain. It's impossible to see because of the thin piece. I dampen it slightly and it planes like butter. I installed the 24" diameter turntable hardware after putting a coat of Osmo on the bottom, then hit the top. I still have a couple of coats to go before it's ready to ship. Evan is happy with it.
    14 points
  10. Hi all, Thanks again for all the good advice! I would like to close the loop here and show the finished project. This was my first cabinet-like piece of furniture with drawers and doors and the like. I spray painted it white using my Fuji HVLP spray painter. Other than test runs, this was the first time I used the Fuji. The paint is General Finishes, three coats of primer, and three coats of Milk Paint. The top is Formica laminate, glued on one inch plywood with weld-wood contact cement and finished with a hard maple edge banding. Unfortunately the fishtank was damaged during transport and we have to wait for the replacement. Thanks Christoph
    13 points
  11. My dream tool came in today. Got lost for about 2 weeks in St Louis (not sure how you lose something this big), but finally got it. So excited to have a full compliment of tools to use again.
    13 points
  12. A friend I've known from school saw a segmented bowl I made for my daughter it was my first one so he asked it I would make one for his wife for there anniversary ..... two years later surprise it's done (procrastination is my specialty) no covid hit the world I had a surgery yada yada yada here's some pics it still needs finish.
    13 points
  13. My daughter, who lives in Laos, brought this back as a Christmas present for me. It was carved in a village near where she lives. It's Burmese padauk / Pterocarpus macrocarpus, which in Laos is called maidu / maidou, which means "red wood". It's 6.5" tall and 7" long. Not sure what the tusks are made of but they appear to be wood. Probably just particularly clear sapwood of the same tree.
    13 points
  14. I put up the rear speakers in the shop and thought to take a couple pics from that vantage point just for grins.
    13 points
  15. Today, I harvested the first fruits of a walnut tree that I have been nurturing for almost 25 years. The 'grandparent' of this tree grew in a wooded area of my grandfather's property, adjacent to the house where I grew up. When I was about 10 years old, my grandparent's rented a small house on this property to a family with a couple of boys near my age. I recall us spending a few great summers, roaming around the 'wilderness' where my grandfather had once raised cows. We built a 'fort' from driftwood collected along a small stream that flowed through, fished in the lake that the stream emptied into, and tamed the wild frontier with our lever-action Daisy BB rifles. On a hot summer day, nothing could quence our thirst like a long drink of the cold, clear springwater that flowed from the roots of that old walnut tree. We even relied on that spring for drinking water during the great ice storm of '74, when power was out for more than two weeks, and a tray of ice Dad left in the kitchen sink didn't melt for that entire time. Sometime after the renters moved on, my grandfather collected some nuts from that walnut, and managed to get a couple growing in his back yard. After building my current home, he gave me a wheel barrow full of nuts from one of those trees. He passed away in 1999, so that must have been '97 or '98. Anyway, I left a pile of those nuts outside, so the outer hulls would dry up and be easier to clean off. A few were forgotten, and the next spring, five little walnut trees had sprouted. I transplanted them to more favorable parts of my yard, and hoped they would grow. Over the years, one by one, they succomed to drought, poor soil, or being mowed over by accident. The sole survivor has died back at least three times, only to sprout anew the following spring. I have moved it a couple of times, finally locating to a spot that seems to work. After a couple of decades, it is finally taller than me, and healthy enough to produce nuts. The memories it brings to mind will always be more valuable than any lumber it could possibly produce.
    13 points
  16. Like I mentioned before a lot of the parts for the headboard were done at the same time as the footboard because of using the same set ups for both. The only part that still need to be made was the top panel. The panel had a curve at the top and again because of the space in my shop I couldn't use the bandsaw for the cut so I used my jigsaw. I cleaned up the edge with a spoke shave. At this point I was like a horse headed for the barn and ceased to remember to take any pictures, but basically the only other thing I did before starting all the glue ups was to cut a rabbet along the bottom of the curved top panel and the top edge of the top rail to glue the two pieces together. The rest of the glue up was the same as the footboard. Completed headboard. My intention was to have the top panel have a recessed appearance similar the top drawer of the nightstands with the same band of molding right below it. Monday we emptied to bedroom and I shampooed the carpet. Then yesterday I set everything up. This picture got taken before the slats were in place. And the new mattress arrived this morning. The nightstands have gained a rich dark color since bringing them in the house, I can't wait until the bed is the same. We just need to find a bed spread that we or at least my wife is happy with and that will be the end of this project. This was an interesting milestone, with the exception of two couches and my wife's piano all the furniture in our house has now been made by me.
    13 points
  17. It's funny . . . . . . these machines don't seem nearly as big as they did in the old shop.
    13 points
  18. This table will end up in a spare bedroom to hold the desktop computer and printer, the top is 20 X 40 and it stands 32 high, all M&T joints pegged with walnut dowels, the top "floats" 3/8" up from the legs, zebra wood pulls that are screwed on and the heads covered with 3/8" square walnut pegs and the whole thing finished with 2 coats of shellac then 3 coats of ARS satin, i am particularly pleased with the grain match across the front apron/drawers, i think that came out real nice although non woodworkers would not notice, should have done a journal on this one but things in the shop are moving pretty fast and i had to knock this one out quick to get on to other projects. thanks for looking and as usual comments, questions and criticism are always welcome.
    12 points
  19. Picked up some really nice canary wood recently and here are a couple of candle holders turned from one piece of each plank. Finish so far is just a couple of applications of clear stain. Not sure what topcoat I'll use on them. Red streaked one, about 5" diameter yellow one, about 3.5" diameter
    12 points
  20. Well this was an unexpected surprise
    12 points
  21. Finished up this cherry table and installed last night. Didn't manage to take too many in process shots, but will share what I've got. Started with building the top. First time attempting a breadboard end. Biggest challenge was figured out how to create the tenons on the ends of the huge slab of wood, which I could barely lift. The best I could come up with was using my router and making floating tenons. The article I read on drawboring suggested using 1/4" dowel stock. I got greedy and decided to use 3/8" dowel thinking it would be stronger. That worked fine on 8 of the 12 locations, but I did get some splitting of the end board on the last 4. In retrospect, I think the dowels were a bit too stiff and 1/4" would have been a better choice. I temporarily mounted the top on some metal legs I had, but decided that a wooden base was really what I wanted. Also the metal legs were too tall for this use, and had been purchased for a different project. Initially I had a fairly straight forward design for the base: But I decided this was a bit boring so I came up with this shape that was intended to bring to mind a multi span bridge structure: Also, in case you are wondering, the walnut socks on the table legs were necessary because the table legs were salvaged from another unrealized project and some large diameter holes were already drilled into them. I felt this was a reasonably elegant and environmentally friendly solution. The biggest thing I could have done better on this project was in the main panel glue up, using cauls to get a flatter starting point would have saved a lot of subsequent hand planning and sanding work. Live and learn... and learn again... and again. Here she is, installed in the dining room. Cherry with walnut accents and Tried and True oil finish.
    12 points
  22. 12 points
  23. For the sake of transparency . . . So, your branding iron gets bumped off the little holder and you are so focused on what you are doing that you don't notice. You are now so pleased with yourself for having done what you were doing that you run off to show the wife in the house. You return to the shop after chatting up SWMBO, making a cup of coffee, and generally goofing off. I smell SMOKE!!! Sorry I didn't get a pic without the template in place. Route out the bad, cut an inlay to match . . . Fettle the fit a little. Lay in some glue and drive it near flush (I scaled the patch to be a bit proud). Card scrape it flush. After a bit of finish it should . . . . . . be a big fat constant reminder for me to stay focused on safety!!!
    12 points
  24. I have a friend that I play softball with who asked me if I wold make a baseball holder. He asked if I could make something like this. Unfortunately, I was unable to make him one like that. I did find some time to make him one though. It is made from Bubinga veneer and Cherry. Finished with Arm-R-Seal satin.
    12 points
  25. Niagara falls at sunset.
    12 points
  26. My 7 year old granddaughter was over today. She brought a stool kit that needed to be assembled for her day camp and as a requirement for her Cub Scout Wolf badge. So we dug into it. The supplied stretcher was too thick by about 30 thou, (yes, I use calipers for this), so I showed her how to use my #4 smoother to thin it down. She did pretty well controlling it. One of the top planks was missing, so Grandpa ripped up a new one. Myhrie glued and nailed everything together. It came out pretty nice. She wanted to paint it purple, but I didn't have that color in stock. It was a fun hour.
    12 points
  27. Yep, for the second time and this time I didn’t enjoy it nearly as much as the first time. I painted a piece of furniture that I built! My wife asked me to build her an armoire to fit in our newly remodeled and enlarged bedroom. I got goosebumps, thinking walnut or cherry. Then she pulls up a Pinterest or something equally as disgusting photo of one that had been painted and glazed. Almost 50 years of being happily married flashed across my mind and never has she asked for something that distasteful. But as faithful as she has been, I knew if I didn’t, another guy would. I built it from poplar and stain grade birch ply with at least a solid maple, unpainted drawer box! Doors and drawer front are inset with self closing European Blum hinges on the doors and soft closing under-mount glides for the drawers. Both of which are also a first and not the last. Due to overhead lighting, the shelf edges look lighter than the interior. At least it’s finally finished and out of my shop.
    12 points
  28. The look with finish and hardware. And the client dropped by. They both had big smiles and were very pleased. I work for a 2 part paycheck. The money and pleasing the client. Naturally I like money but the clients with a big grin and many not begged for accolades is a big part of the paycheck. Pleasing clients motivates me too.
    12 points
  29. I had a request from a friend to build a chess board for his wife's birthday. I figured it would be a fun project so I agreed. My plan was to make the board out of veneer initially but couldn't wrap my mind around how to ensure the veneer was cut perfectly. So instead i cut 1/8" thick shop veneer and just used the table saw. I started by sawing enough veneer to make roughly 2 boards as I'd need to do a balanced panel. Once i had the veneer cut and sanded on the drum sander I ripped out 2.25" wide strips. I figured it'd be easiest to make this like a cutting board and glue the pieces together into a board then cross cut strips. I used plywood cauls to keep everything nice and flat. Then alternating the cross cut strips it was easy to build out the checkerboard. The backside was more walnut and maple, I didn't go through the effort to make the hidden underside checkered but it still looks nice. To glue the checkerboard onto the Baltic birch core, i used blue tape that I stretched out. There is just enough elasticity in painters tape to hold a project like this together. On the left side of the core i glued down a scrap strip that I jointed and used to align the checkerboard. It helped me get everything strait and square. after glued I'd just trim this piece off. To glue my shop veneer down i used a layer of pink insulation 3 pieces of plywood and a lot of cauls and clamps. I just used my regular TB II wood glue. This got me some good squeeze out around the edges so I figured it got me enough pressure. I really should buy a vacuum bag kit. After the glue set I trimmed the board to size this revealed a nice sandwich with no visible voids. After the core was done I just made a frame and box to raise the board a bit. Finish was applied and project complete. I used miters to make the frame and box that acts as the stand. The corners of the box were reinforced with splines.
    12 points
  30. Last summer I helped my youngest granddaughter, nine at the time, make a coffee table. A couple of weeks ago my seventeen year old granddaughter ask if I could help her Make a jewelry box for her boy friends birthday. In both cases I was just the teacher and safety adviser. They both did the actual work. I thought I would post some pictures of different parts of the process. Making miter cuts for the box sides. Appling finish to the insides of the box before the glue up. The box all glued up. Thats her tray prototype in the back ground. Making a blade change. Setting the miter gauge stop block There is a tray that goes in the box and here she is cutting the miters on some of those parts. The tray glued up and the box itself. Gluing up... ... and assembling the dividers for the tray. Some final sanding before applying finish to the outsides of things. And finally spraying the top coat. I should add that the box, tray and lid handle are all Cherry and the lid itself is Birdseye Maple. A couple of finished project shots.
    12 points
  31. Joinery cut and dry fit.
    12 points
  32. So i've been trying to get together with a friends son for about 3 months to get a look at some wood he says he and his father milled a long tome ago, they have a kiln and a mill and i've been friends with his dad for over 40 years, but you know how these things go, is it good wood, properly taken care of, what's the price ect. well we got together yesterday and let me tell you i was blown away, this guy has tonnage of all types of wood, kiln dried, skip planed to 4/4 and stored inside huge buildings. these are pictures of his walnut and a couple of my lumber rack straining under the load, more in my storage shed. Now for the best part, walnut was $2.00 a BF, Cherry $1.50 and white oak $2.00, white oak was what he called "shorts" mostly 4' some 3' some 5' all was 4/4, you can see some of the walnut is 12" wide, i'd say this was a good day ! i have to find room to store some more !
    11 points
  33. Took a day off of woodworking and my wife and I went to the symphony at the Grand Opera House, very cool building built in 1890 and beautifully restored, music was awesome, Beethoven mostly
    11 points
  34. Found a good deal on this a few days ago and decided to take the plunge so I don't have to rely on a loaner.
    11 points
  35. This will be my journal as I build two Michael Fortune #1 chairs, one at the MASW and one on my own. I just returned late last night from my first 8 days at the school I will go back in late September for the second week. Two days building jigs for the chair, 5 day week 1 class, and 1 day bandsaw seminar with Michael. First a couple callouts. The MASW is an awesome place to learn. I have met some wonderful woodworkers and life long friends there and this week was no exception. Its a first rate operation and the instructors, facilities, food are all first class. Michael Fortune is not only a world renowned wood worker but one of the nicest funniest people I have had the pleasure of working with. Tonight's post will be quick becuase I am tired lol and I have many pics to sort through MASW is located just outside Indianapolis IN Here is a pic of the Michael Fortune #1 Chair these are done in solid Ebony with real silver and mother of pearl inlays. My chairs will be done in walnut and then ebonized. This pic is of a walnut chair like the ones we are making in class, its not assembled so that we can take it apart and see how everything fits together. As you can see the chair has curves everywhere of the 19 pieces that make up the chair only 3 do not have compound curves. Here are some of the many jigs and templates required to make the chair This pic shows the chair parts. From the top down: back chair legs, back slats (all 5 are on this drying form), and the arms. all of these parts were steam bent. Next you have the front legs, the front seat stretcher, crest rail, and bottom rail, and finally the seat frame. at this point all the joinery is cut in the non steamed parts and the shaping has begun.
    11 points
  36. Cut into the hill and pushed some dirt around. Preparing a flat spot for a play set for the grand kids.
    11 points
  37. Dreamery: where dreams go when you’re not sleeping. The piece is 5 ½” tall by 10 ½” wide. It is made from butternut and walnut. Surfaces are sanded to p1200 and finished with Osmo Polyx-Oil (satin). A making journal was posted here:
    11 points
  38. UPDATE I’ve got the quarter columns, the top and the upper drawer completed. I’m waiting for my new bandsaw to be delivered so I can finish cutting the rest of the drawer fronts.
    11 points
  39. I took today off to get a break since my busy season is winding down. I’m lucky I did because I got a surprise bandsaw delivery! No call or notice that they were coming out, just got a call when he was parked at the end of our ~600’ winding gravel driveway in a 48’ truck. Spun his tires in my field for a while trying to turn around and acted like it was my fault he tore up my grass. Typically if they are in a truck over 24’ I have them wait at the main road and unload them there. Net weight 441lb (gross 490 but the tractor can get it to my shop door), this should be fun by myself.
    11 points
  40. The word of the day on this day, today, is storage. It was getting hard to even think in the shop, so I took a break from electrical and insulation to deal with getting all the stuff out of piles on the floor. Specifically tackling two elements: lumber, and literally everything else. Lumber storage To begin, I needed to clear space along the half-wall/loft where I'm planning to store lumber. So all the ugly plywood that I'd pulled down needed a home out in the shed. I'd end up using several of the nicer sheets for shelving, but I needed to get it all together first. CDX plywood base sitting on a 2x2 PT frame up on some concrete edging. At one point the plan had been to store more lumber on the walls of the shed. After looking at the structure, I decided to limit that particular storage to construction lumber and bring the good stuff inside. I extended the half-wall vertically with a sheet of 3/4" CDX and some 2x blocking to tie things together. Most of the weight remains oriented downward, so I'm not too worried about the wall's overall strength. The lower series of 2x12s are also a lot more rigid now. At the 4' point I added a 1x3 rail which, combined with the thinner plywood backer, created a nice groove from which to hang moveable dividers (inspired by gee-dub). I used notched 2x3's with a separate slider screwed in at the back to give them a little more horizontal rigidity. The end rails are immobile. I still need to get some chain or bungees for safety, but with the angled bottom nothing has threatened to bbudge I didn't discover any hidden nests of sapele, but this was a good reminder of what I did have in the back of the stacks. The rack has about 80% of my hardwood lumber loaded. There's a catch-all section on the left, followed by maple, white oak , red oak, and walnut. Most of this came in an assorted lot I bought off another woodworker years ago. Everything Else Like a lot of people, I grew up watching Mythbusters, and as a result I have Jamie Hyneman's wall of storage permanently burned into my brain. I'm keeping my walls open and clear for the ongoing remodel, but the back of my lumber rack makes a natural place for storage. Lighter and bulkier items (foam, vacuum hose, etc) are up in the loft, but anything I'm likely to need while working lives here. Simple 2x and plywood utility shelving. I was already using a combination of these bankers boxes and 6qt plastic shoeboxes in my prior shop and other craft spaces, so this was an expansion of my existing standardization, with a handful of clear flip-tops for bulky items like wire spools. The middle shelf is currently being used as a clutter-catcher, but is sized for another row of bankers once I have more permanent space for my fastener and hardware jars. The file cabinet is for liquids/flammables. Paint, glue, etc. Got it for a steal at my old surplus place. Clear space and a table I already posted this in the bench thread, but with "Mount *bleep*" finally cleared away, I had room to knock up a basic assembly table to give me somewhere more constructive to pile junk. It's just some squared-up 2x4s, 2x6s, and two sheets of 3/4” prefinished plywood that the BORG had marked down. I sized it to match the height of my tablesaw, though I doubt I'll ever use it as an outfeed there wasn't really a compelling alternative presenting itself. The base and top are easily replaced/separated if I ever feel like lowering it for a project. A 4x8 assembly table feels like a ridiculous luxury, but the length has already proven handy. Behind it you can see my high-tech ripping extension for the tablesaw, aka a 2x6x8 bolted to the back rail of the saw with a foot at the end. It was a necessity for ripping down lumber for the assembly table (roller stands and I have never gotten along). I'm trying to reuse every scrap of old construction lumber I've recovered or brought with me. Even once I get around to making a proper outfeed table, I might still keep this thing in the shed. A name I'm not sure at what point I did this, but I decided that the new shop deserved a name. So taking a cue from one of the classics and my own PNW heritage, I decided to try my hand at a little freehand sign carving. It says "The New Mossback Workshop" if the image isn't clear. The original settlers and farmers of the Oregon territory were sometimes derisively called mossbacks. In the 1800's they were often said (in eastern newspapers) to have things too easy, as the crop yields and economic opportunity out here were so plentiful that they wouldn't need to work hardly at all to earn everything they needed and would succumb to sloth. There's a local historian/commentor who has been reclaiming the term and I enjoy it. Definitely a bit rough, but for a first try I'm happy with it. I printed out the text in Copperplate Gothic and traced the outlines into a piece of scrap cedar. I totally screwed up the alignment of the second line, but trucked on anyways. The bulk of the work was done with a 90* v-bit in my little router, and I came back with a razor knife and flexcut gouge to clean up some edges and do the serifs. Finished and hanging above the door.
    11 points
  41. Electricians came this morning. Instead of just removing the existing 240v 30a oven circuit, they had the genius idea (or maybe I’m just an idiot for not thinking of it) of shortening jt by 5’ and terminating it in a box in my shop and then ran a separate new circuit for the oven. Now I have an extra 240v line in the shop
    11 points
  42. Today I built myself a Bankers-style plane tote.
    11 points
  43. It is finished. At last! The suspended shelf leaves room on the lower shelf for a couple pairs of shoes, and a pair of tall boots, if desired. Glad to get this one done. I have to say, I am not a fan of brushing the GF High Performance poly. Dries so fast, and gets foamy in the brush if you work it too much. I'm accustomed to laying oil poly on with a rag, very thin. Does HP do better in thicker coats?
    11 points
  44. Well this has been on my to do list for awhile, and I'm finally back to having time in the workshop. As a High School coach for baseball, spring can be a very hectic time, one reason I've been missing in action on this site the last few months. Well the season finally wrapped up and I'm ready for some alone time in the shop. I've been wanting to make a couch for a while, but my usually agreeable wife has not been sold on the idea. She usually is very happy with everything I build, but a wood framed couch with cushions is one area she has been resistant. Now I was overly impressed with @h3nry's upholstered couch, but I was not ready to leap that far in with this build. I was holding the line at a "Madmen" inspired piece of furniture, which I have truly come to admire and I truly love to build. I think the MCM stuff really shines when it comes to pieces you sit in and this was what I wanted to build, except for my lovely wife. Her main complaint was that the arms would be uncomfortable to recline against when one puts their legs up on the couch to read or watch TV. Now I had planned on a loveseat first, but this is where my wife usually sits to read or watch TV, hence her concern for comfort. In the same room we have a full size couch which she rarely uses. One night, she made a fatal mistake, she commented on how the couch was looking a little ragged. That was all the opening I needed, I said I'll handle it and when I'm done I'm predicting you'll ask for a matching loveseat. Now I've got to deliver....... I'm looking at a low slung couch, sculpted arms and sides. The back will be about 29" high without the cushions and it will be approx 71" long. The seat will recline at a 4/5 degree angle perpendicular to the floor and the back rest will sit at a 100 degree angle from the seat. there will be a middle support roughly shaped like the sides but with flat areas for joining the seat frames So off to the shop and my "digital design" program, graph paper. After a few attempts and a lot of erasing this is a side profile of the couch; I've played around with programs for design but I do really like this graph paper, once drawn up I cut out the pieces from the paper and make templates, easy in my mind, and a full sized visual. Of course it has it's limitations, that I understand. Once the templates are made I retrace on a new piece of paper and retain the full sized pic. The middle support was made by tracing the main pieces on another sheet and then altering areas that need altering. Here's the templates; Now I'm trying to keep most of my joints at 90 degrees to the floor, or base of the chair. this will make rectangular blanks ideal for creating tight joints. Here's the back leg and you can see that once the blank is sized I line up the joint areas to the side of the blank and make sure the bottom of the leg matches the base of the blank; And the front leg; And the blanks "put together" prior to cutting on the bandsaw. This just is a check to make sure things line uo; Free floating tenons (dominos) for joinery, 4 for the back leg to stretcher joint and two for the front leg stretcher joint. So the sides went together well, now to the middle support. Here I have two flat areas for the seat frame; So before gluing I use the L fence to cut these lines; And here I left a little extra at the front leg, I'll clean this up after gluing; And here is how the middle support relates to the side, you can see the flat areas clearly here that will support the seat fram; The back frame will be in two pieces and be glued to the inside edge of the sides and both sides of the middle support flush to the flat area. Here I completed the cut to line up the front leg, thanks to the L fence again. This pic also shows the middle leg against the side leg more clearly and I struck a line on the inside surface of the side to indicate where the bottom of the seat frame will rest; On to some shaping, here's a side without the arm yet sculpted; And here are all three pieces posing for a pic, sides and middle with lines struck on each to indicate frame locations; Next it will be back frame fabrication and front under the seat support fabrication. Then on to the arms and glue up of those pieces. For the seat frame I am hoping to do that in one panel, approx 68" long. That will be the most challenging part I think. Getting the long pieces to that frame true and square will be a challenge. The look from the front will be much nicer if it is in one piece or I'd do it in two. We'll see how that progresses. I hope you guys find this build interesting and I hope my wife finds it comfortable.
    11 points
  45. OK, it's been awhile, and my patience has finally paid off. My upholstery guy took the month of July off, and with the backlog of work he had to do I just got the couch back this week. So it's time to put a bow on this build. I like the fabric we picked, the cushions and couch look real clean and it sits very well. The MCM look is beginning to permeate my home, and this project will result in a few matching pieces for the room (love seat, coffee table, end tables). So here's the finally couch; Thanks for following along and I hope this was enjoyable to watch, I can say it was enjoyable to build.
    11 points
  46. It was a weekend for Labours of love. Saturday was hauling horses for my Daughter's last local show for the year. It was fun for me as it is normally my wife's department. The two of them are going on a big trip, taking in three shows in two weeks in September so I called dibs to take her this time. Sunday was bucking and splitting the last of this season's fire wood. We burn about 3 cords a winter and i like to have two years supply in the shed. This year a neighbour did some clearing and was kind enough to deck a bunch of alder and hemlock to give me at least two years supply. It's more than will fit in the shed so some will be stacked in the yard. Today was bee day, doing mite tests checking on stores and feeding them in preparation for winter. I really enjoy beekeeping but it is a lot like any other livestock or farming...lot's of work and investment in hopes of a good yeild but as many years of disappointment as years of plenty.
    11 points
  47. Well, this has been one long (time wise) and very heavy project All that is left to be done is drill the 3/4" dog holes and put some finish on it. The Bench it replaced...... This vise is awesome to use..... I even got the grain to match up on the sliding tail vise which simply means I lucked out
    11 points
  48. It was Saturday but due to a premature baby for the scheduled officiant I was honored to marry my youngest Oh and a little woodworking project too
    11 points
  49. Finally done with this one, 3 coats of satin ARS, sorry for the poor quality of the journal, i didn't take nearly enough pictures of how it was built or showed how it was done, thanks for looking and as usual any comments are always welcome
    10 points