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  1. I just finished these two nightstands this past weekend. They are made of Sapele and finished with one coat of blond shellac and then I sprayed 3 light coats of General Finishes High Performance. I will be making the bed to go with them but won't get that started until June sometime.
    20 points
  2. It doesn't rain often around here but when it does odd things sprout up.
    18 points
  3. I have been meaning to post pictures of this project for a while. I actually finished this in Feb. I was going to do a journal, but as I started to work it up I realized there wasn't much different in my process this time as compared to the last time that I journaled. Xenia is the Ancient Greek custom and practice of offering hospitality without hesitation, particularly to strangers. So here are some pictures: The base piece is made from Honduran mahogany and the basin is maple. The finish is Osmo Polyx-Oil satin.
    17 points
  4. As many of you know my father passed away a week ago Monday and as we work through the process one of the things that came up was the need for an URN for his ashes. The family decided to go with a wooden box type urn. As the funeral home showed us what was available they either looked really cheap or the prices climbed to the $1K range. Knowing my father (who was quite cheap LOL) I offered to make the the box and thought I would take you all along for the ride. First up was the design we wanted something clean and fairly simple yet nice. I decided to go with what I had in the shop so originally was thinking a walnut box with a birdseye maple lid but after refining the design switched to curly maple, more on that later. First up was to pull some some stock After finding the wood I wanted to use I did some resawing. I will do a four side match on the box and also prepped the wood for the veneer After resting for a few days I brought the shop made veneer down to about 1/16" using a sled at the drum sander Next up I laid out the lid design. I decided it was time to put to use the Scott Grove veneer classes I have been taking. After getting the design laid out I decided the curly maple would look better then the birdseye. My feeling was the curly would look like rays behind the cross or at least that's what I hoped. So I set out cutting, planing and fitting each piece Next up I prepped the bottom for glue up. Two layers of resawn walnut and an 1/8" MDF filler After prep they went into the vacuum bag For those interested I use a qualityvak.com system Next up I came up with the cross size Then set about creating a fence syetem that wouldn't allow me to mess this up LOL Fine tuned with hand tools I glued the long piece in first then rinse and repeat for the cross piece After a little clean up with a hand plane it was ready for finish Next up I need to make the box sides.
    17 points
  5. This was a build for my dog agility instructor. Somehow over the years, The chess table that had been in her family got lost or stolen. She asked if I could make one for her and she wnated her parents initials in the top of the table. In the following pics t he chess squares are 1/42" carelian birch and walnut on Baltic birch plywood The frame is solid walnut. The playing surface is 16 x 16" and the table is 26" square overall. Frame is glued to the border with the addition of 3 dominoes along each side. I changed the domino depth setting just a bit beween drilling the boards and drilling the frame so that the framewould be ever so slightly proud of the board. So I could sand the frame downe to meet the thin veneer. I wanted to do as little sanding on the veneer as possible. The frames's miter joinery is a little differnet. A couple of typical dominoes along each miter was my first thought unitl I realized that the dominoes sticking out would not allow installation of the 4th side of the frame. After a discussion with @RichardA ( thank you Rick ) I decided to cut a long, shallow mortise using the domoino machine into each border piece and use 2 dominoes end to end and sideways in the mortise. This allowed enough clearance to insert the 4th side of the frame whil keeping the accuracy of domino alignment. The side apron stringing is 1/32" wide and about 1/16" deep basswood. legs and apron are finished with 2 coats of dewaxed shellac (rag applied) and 3 coats of Satin ARS - rag applied. The tophas 2 coasts of shellac and several coats of GF water based poly. I used a brush for the poly and got brush marks. I snade them out and tried a sponge applicator got spnge applicator marks. Resanded. Many thanks to @Pkinneb who graciously agreed to spray the top with my remaining poly. Turned out great. About the initials. A friend of mine that I met at a veneering class about 3 years ago has become very good and Marquetry. He offered to cut the walnut initials into little carelian birch rectangles and did a great job. I cut the rectangles to size and routed and glued them into the top. I have a very happy client and again thanks to those who helped.
    17 points
  6. I should have done a journal on this one but I get involved and forget. Anyway, this is my latest project. The detail work to at least as much time as the desk itself. I know that a couple of us have made shameless plugs for Marc Adadsm school of Woodworking and this deak is another. The design of the desk, joinery techniques, stringing and oval inlay, strining and finishing (sort of) were all the result of the school. The carving is a result of Mary May's online school. I think is all starting to come together. Desk is walnut 9Oh, my God - the price of walnut up here). Desk is 24" x 48" x 30" high. Joinery includes dovetail at each end of the front top rail to the legs, doulbe mortise and tenons for the face frame joints and dominoes for the side and back rails to the legs and between the pieces that make up the top. I use power tools to hog out the dovetails and mortises and pair to the scrib elines with chisels. The sides and back are frame and panel use 1/4" walnut veneer plywood (actually turned out to be just over 3/16) Tray for keyboard in place of center drawer. Not really a federal style feature but that's what was required. Legs were grroved to look like columns with base and cap of 1/4" half rounds in 1/8" grooves. Bottoms of 1 5/8" square legs are tapered 4 sides to 3/4" square. Cockbeading on drawers was new for me. top and bottm cock bead on each drawer cover the entire top ( or bottom) face edge while the side cock beading is much narrower so as not to cover up the dovetails. Carvings are a simple bracket design. Thank you Mary May. Top and vertical edges are mortised and tenoned to the frame to add stiffness. String and oval and bell flowers are mad of holly. The oval is 12 pieces of holly veneer cut out of a rectangle shape, sand shaded and then re-assembled and glued to 1/8" bacltic birch. Then I cut the final oval shape and applied the Holly border. Next I used double stick tape to hole it in place while I scribed around the oval. Finally routed it out and glued it in place String in the top for decoration. Stringin is 1/32" wide. I used a dremel tool with edge guide or circle cutting jig to make 1/32" wide x 1/16" deep grooves. Finish is Satin ARS over 2 coats of shellac. The body of the desk has 2 coats rag applied and the top has 5 coats applied with sponge brush and a lot of sanding in between coats to get the surface grain filled enough to be a decent writing surface That's about it. Thanks for reading.
    16 points
  7. Finally finished up the Shaker End Table from the Guild. Learned a ton, made my share of mistakes but overall I’m pleased with how it came out. My first time using cherry. Was just asked by SWMBO when her coffee table and TV stand will be done.
    16 points
  8. I have to share this news with you folks. In fact I think you get some of the credit for encouraging me. One of my pieces was chosen by the American Association of Woodturners for inclusion in the AAW's 2021 Member Exhibition, Finding the Center. I'm dumbfounded. I just had no expectation of being selected; I almost didn't enter. The piece they selected was "Offering", wip down to the bottom of the first page this journal to see some pictures: The exhibit is at the AAW gallery in Minneapolis and runs from Sept 5 to Dec 30, so I've got a while to wait. But if next fall you find yourself in the vicinity, with absolutely nothing else to do, and it's raining, heavily, and unseasonably cold, you can pop in their gallery for a look at the exhibition.
    15 points
  9. Our granddaughter’s other grandfather has a ranch in south Texas and loves to be outdoors. Her dad taught her to shoot at an early age and turned her loose in a blind at age 14 and scored this doe. This year, she was taken off of the doe, cull buck only list and got this 10 pt. fellow. She’s darn good at the pistol range too when we can find ammo.
    15 points
  10. It seems strange that I've only been on this site for just six plus years. But it never lets me down, you old guys and even the new guys make this place enjoyable, and instructive. I've learned and grown in my woodworking thanks to all of you, and since today is Christmas eve, I just want to thank you all for your input, and wish each and everyone of you a very Happy holiday, and a Merry Christmas. You're a good bunch!
    15 points
  11. As some of you may recall ( or not), I Started taking on line carving classes from Mary May last spring and took a carving class at Marc Adams school from Alex Grabavotskiy this fall. So enough with just carving practice lessons in basswood. Here are some of my first carved piece. Sides have the background lowered leaving the carving. The rossetes on the doors are carved appliques carved separately. Cheap Woodcraft African Mahogany. Nice wood for carving.
    15 points
  12. I know that I haven't been very active on the forum lately but I have been in the shop. Here are a few pics of my completed project. And a hidden compartment. Next Project will be a table to set it on. Think I will incorporate Cabriole legs - something new each project. I'll try to look in on you guys more often.
    14 points
  13. This is number 41, and I have decided to call it “My Scars Are Me”. The name deserves a little explanation. I purchased the wood from an estate sale, so I don’t know what it is exactly. It was labeled Australian burr, but I’m given to understand that Australia is actually host to more than one species of tree. But it certainly is a burr with lots of bold swirling grain, as well as bark inclusions, knots and other defects large and small. As I began to work the wood I was at first concerned that the inherent defects would not only result in a frail piece, but would also preclude a silky smooth finish. As I pondered filling them with epoxy, I realized that all these features didn’t just make the wood visually more interesting, they were in fact what made the wood. They were the wood’s substance, what it was composed of. This piece of wood is, just as you, I and everyone are, the sum of its scars. It is the “slings and arrows” endured that have fundamentally been the niduses of our own creation. It measures 4 ½” x 9”. It’s sanded to P600 and there is one coat of Osmo Polyx-Oil satin.
    14 points
  14. This week I decided it was time to make a couple upgrades to my existing tool. First I replaced my 1950's Craftsman jointer with a new Grizzly 6" jointer. Then I I upgraded my crappy HF 8" drill press with a new 12" Grizzly drill press. I decided to mount it to my large Husky too box. To do this I had to move my spindle sander to my small Husky tool box. This is where I had my old drill press mounted. I originally put the new one on it but I decided it felt to unstable.
    14 points
  15. Alison's son asked if I would make a 32" lazy Susan for him to give to his aunt for her birthday. I'm in the high, dry desert of northern New Mexico and they live in hot, humid, Houston, so wood movement was a big concern. He sent me a link to a YT video of a maker making one out of construction lumber. I couldn't see doing that. I figured veneering would make more sense and remain much more stable. I resawed some walnut for the veneer. I remembered that Craig Thibodeau has a chapter in his book on veneering where he did a large starburst pattern. What do you know, his example was 32" in diameter. Saved me from doing the math. I made the template from ½" MDF to exact size. After rough cutting the shapes at the bandsaw, I sandwiched the veneers into a stack with the template on top and used the edge sander to sneak up on the line. They came out great and took no time at all. I laid them up on 1" (2 layers of ½") MDF with poplar veneer as a backer. I used Titebond Cold Press Veneer glue. Worked really well. I used a router on a shop made circle jig to cut it out. Then made a template from ½" Baltic birch, tweaking it by clamping a spare roll of drum sander paper to the circumference of the veneered panel. Dialed it in spot on. I used the Domino to align the top surfaces and banded it in 1 ¼" walnut. I used the circle jig again to cut the ⅛" inlay channel and sized some cherry down to a snug fit. Note - Sometimes planing the banding can be tricky if there's any wavy grain. It's impossible to see because of the thin piece. I dampen it slightly and it planes like butter. I installed the 24" diameter turntable hardware after putting a coat of Osmo on the bottom, then hit the top. I still have a couple of coats to go before it's ready to ship. Evan is happy with it.
    14 points
  16. I put up the rear speakers in the shop and thought to take a couple pics from that vantage point just for grins.
    13 points
  17. Today, I harvested the first fruits of a walnut tree that I have been nurturing for almost 25 years. The 'grandparent' of this tree grew in a wooded area of my grandfather's property, adjacent to the house where I grew up. When I was about 10 years old, my grandparent's rented a small house on this property to a family with a couple of boys near my age. I recall us spending a few great summers, roaming around the 'wilderness' where my grandfather had once raised cows. We built a 'fort' from driftwood collected along a small stream that flowed through, fished in the lake that the stream emptied into, and tamed the wild frontier with our lever-action Daisy BB rifles. On a hot summer day, nothing could quence our thirst like a long drink of the cold, clear springwater that flowed from the roots of that old walnut tree. We even relied on that spring for drinking water during the great ice storm of '74, when power was out for more than two weeks, and a tray of ice Dad left in the kitchen sink didn't melt for that entire time. Sometime after the renters moved on, my grandfather collected some nuts from that walnut, and managed to get a couple growing in his back yard. After building my current home, he gave me a wheel barrow full of nuts from one of those trees. He passed away in 1999, so that must have been '97 or '98. Anyway, I left a pile of those nuts outside, so the outer hulls would dry up and be easier to clean off. A few were forgotten, and the next spring, five little walnut trees had sprouted. I transplanted them to more favorable parts of my yard, and hoped they would grow. Over the years, one by one, they succomed to drought, poor soil, or being mowed over by accident. The sole survivor has died back at least three times, only to sprout anew the following spring. I have moved it a couple of times, finally locating to a spot that seems to work. After a couple of decades, it is finally taller than me, and healthy enough to produce nuts. The memories it brings to mind will always be more valuable than any lumber it could possibly produce.
    13 points
  18. Like I mentioned before a lot of the parts for the headboard were done at the same time as the footboard because of using the same set ups for both. The only part that still need to be made was the top panel. The panel had a curve at the top and again because of the space in my shop I couldn't use the bandsaw for the cut so I used my jigsaw. I cleaned up the edge with a spoke shave. At this point I was like a horse headed for the barn and ceased to remember to take any pictures, but basically the only other thing I did before starting all the glue ups was to cut a rabbet along the bottom of the curved top panel and the top edge of the top rail to glue the two pieces together. The rest of the glue up was the same as the footboard. Completed headboard. My intention was to have the top panel have a recessed appearance similar the top drawer of the nightstands with the same band of molding right below it. Monday we emptied to bedroom and I shampooed the carpet. Then yesterday I set everything up. This picture got taken before the slats were in place. And the new mattress arrived this morning. The nightstands have gained a rich dark color since bringing them in the house, I can't wait until the bed is the same. We just need to find a bed spread that we or at least my wife is happy with and that will be the end of this project. This was an interesting milestone, with the exception of two couches and my wife's piano all the furniture in our house has now been made by me.
    13 points
  19. It's funny . . . . . . these machines don't seem nearly as big as they did in the old shop.
    13 points
  20. Final inspection complete. The next phase begins: 2100
    13 points
  21. For the sake of transparency . . . So, your branding iron gets bumped off the little holder and you are so focused on what you are doing that you don't notice. You are now so pleased with yourself for having done what you were doing that you run off to show the wife in the house. You return to the shop after chatting up SWMBO, making a cup of coffee, and generally goofing off. I smell SMOKE!!! Sorry I didn't get a pic without the template in place. Route out the bad, cut an inlay to match . . . Fettle the fit a little. Lay in some glue and drive it near flush (I scaled the patch to be a bit proud). Card scrape it flush. After a bit of finish it should . . . . . . be a big fat constant reminder for me to stay focused on safety!!!
    12 points
  22. I have a friend that I play softball with who asked me if I wold make a baseball holder. He asked if I could make something like this. Unfortunately, I was unable to make him one like that. I did find some time to make him one though. It is made from Bubinga veneer and Cherry. Finished with Arm-R-Seal satin.
    12 points
  23. My 7 year old granddaughter was over today. She brought a stool kit that needed to be assembled for her day camp and as a requirement for her Cub Scout Wolf badge. So we dug into it. The supplied stretcher was too thick by about 30 thou, (yes, I use calipers for this), so I showed her how to use my #4 smoother to thin it down. She did pretty well controlling it. One of the top planks was missing, so Grandpa ripped up a new one. Myhrie glued and nailed everything together. It came out pretty nice. She wanted to paint it purple, but I didn't have that color in stock. It was a fun hour.
    12 points
  24. Yep, for the second time and this time I didn’t enjoy it nearly as much as the first time. I painted a piece of furniture that I built! My wife asked me to build her an armoire to fit in our newly remodeled and enlarged bedroom. I got goosebumps, thinking walnut or cherry. Then she pulls up a Pinterest or something equally as disgusting photo of one that had been painted and glazed. Almost 50 years of being happily married flashed across my mind and never has she asked for something that distasteful. But as faithful as she has been, I knew if I didn’t, another guy would. I built it from poplar and stain grade birch ply with at least a solid maple, unpainted drawer box! Doors and drawer front are inset with self closing European Blum hinges on the doors and soft closing under-mount glides for the drawers. Both of which are also a first and not the last. Due to overhead lighting, the shelf edges look lighter than the interior. At least it’s finally finished and out of my shop.
    12 points
  25. The look with finish and hardware. And the client dropped by. They both had big smiles and were very pleased. I work for a 2 part paycheck. The money and pleasing the client. Naturally I like money but the clients with a big grin and many not begged for accolades is a big part of the paycheck. Pleasing clients motivates me too.
    12 points
  26. I had a request from a friend to build a chess board for his wife's birthday. I figured it would be a fun project so I agreed. My plan was to make the board out of veneer initially but couldn't wrap my mind around how to ensure the veneer was cut perfectly. So instead i cut 1/8" thick shop veneer and just used the table saw. I started by sawing enough veneer to make roughly 2 boards as I'd need to do a balanced panel. Once i had the veneer cut and sanded on the drum sander I ripped out 2.25" wide strips. I figured it'd be easiest to make this like a cutting board and glue the pieces together into a board then cross cut strips. I used plywood cauls to keep everything nice and flat. Then alternating the cross cut strips it was easy to build out the checkerboard. The backside was more walnut and maple, I didn't go through the effort to make the hidden underside checkered but it still looks nice. To glue the checkerboard onto the Baltic birch core, i used blue tape that I stretched out. There is just enough elasticity in painters tape to hold a project like this together. On the left side of the core i glued down a scrap strip that I jointed and used to align the checkerboard. It helped me get everything strait and square. after glued I'd just trim this piece off. To glue my shop veneer down i used a layer of pink insulation 3 pieces of plywood and a lot of cauls and clamps. I just used my regular TB II wood glue. This got me some good squeeze out around the edges so I figured it got me enough pressure. I really should buy a vacuum bag kit. After the glue set I trimmed the board to size this revealed a nice sandwich with no visible voids. After the core was done I just made a frame and box to raise the board a bit. Finish was applied and project complete. I used miters to make the frame and box that acts as the stand. The corners of the box were reinforced with splines.
    12 points
  27. Last summer I helped my youngest granddaughter, nine at the time, make a coffee table. A couple of weeks ago my seventeen year old granddaughter ask if I could help her Make a jewelry box for her boy friends birthday. In both cases I was just the teacher and safety adviser. They both did the actual work. I thought I would post some pictures of different parts of the process. Making miter cuts for the box sides. Appling finish to the insides of the box before the glue up. The box all glued up. Thats her tray prototype in the back ground. Making a blade change. Setting the miter gauge stop block There is a tray that goes in the box and here she is cutting the miters on some of those parts. The tray glued up and the box itself. Gluing up... ... and assembling the dividers for the tray. Some final sanding before applying finish to the outsides of things. And finally spraying the top coat. I should add that the box, tray and lid handle are all Cherry and the lid itself is Birdseye Maple. A couple of finished project shots.
    12 points
  28. Joinery cut and dry fit.
    12 points
  29. Finally, after some danish oil on the trim ... it's ready. I've found before with cherry, that different boards can have a different colour when the finish is furst applied, hopefully as it ages, the colours will even out. Now I have to find out if it will fit through the door into the house ... maybe I should have measured that first!
    12 points
  30. My granddaughter turns 18 May 3rd, I know I got a project done early for a change amazing, I'm usually putting finish on the night before I have to give a gift. I'm happy with the table but, crazy about the finish (my daughter says she loves it) oh well to late to do anything about it. The table is knotty pine with a water based poly finish I made all the moldings on my new router table I'm loving that thing why I waited so long to build one..... I tried my hand at turning some drawer pulls I think they came out good for a first try the are made out of scrap 8/4 walnut.
    12 points
  31. Attached the bottom tonight and took some final beauty shots. Wish I would have had more time to play with some additional inlay strips recommended by Scott Grove but can't risk mucking this one up so I will probably make another similar one to try that on. That's a wrap! Thanks for following along
    12 points
  32. I took my son for his driving exam today, then whatched him drive home in my rearview mirror. His "new" car may be several years old, but you'd think it just rolled off the assembly line... Sorry, too dark for photos, this is a dealer pic.
    12 points
  33. I didn’t do a journal on here but I did snap a few pics along the way. The lumber was sourced from a walnut tree that I cut down about 6 years ago in Louisiana and brought back to Houston to be milled. I’ve made a couple of end tables from some of it but had several 8/4 slabs waiting on the right project. We had a new bathroom added to our house and decided I wanted to build the door going from our bedroom to the bathroom. Here are the slabs in rough form. And after I took a belt sander to them to see what kind of grain I had to work with. After milling to approximately 1 1/2” thick, I cut the rails and stiles to dimension and it was time for assembly. Joinery was with floating tenons and the mortises were cut with the Domino. As I had no experience at building a door, there was considerable pucker involved here. i mortised out for the glass on one side and made some trim pieces to hold the glass. As I only have a couple of slabs of this left, I didn’t want to mill them down for 3/4” lumber for the jamb and casing so I purchased 4/4 stock. With the help of an article written by @Tom Kingon another site he linked me to, I built the jamb and secured it in place. I want to also give credit to members on Kev’s site that held my hand and gave invaluable advice along the way. Finish is ARS with several coats of GF HP top coat. Thanks for looking.
    12 points
  34. Off and on over the past 8 months I have been in the process of handing down my model trains (last used when I was a kid) to my eight year old Grandson. I re scued the oldest of my 3 trains from my sisters closet. It was reapinted yellow in the 1940's and the paint was flaking off. So I decided to bead blast and repaint it with Erie decals in memory of my fathers time with the Erie railroad. Here's on pic of this 100 year old train and two pics of all three: 1950 Diesel, 1934 Steam engine and 1920-ish electric. I think that I am having more fun than my Grandson.
    12 points
  35. This will be my journal as I build two Michael Fortune #1 chairs, one at the MASW and one on my own. I just returned late last night from my first 8 days at the school I will go back in late September for the second week. Two days building jigs for the chair, 5 day week 1 class, and 1 day bandsaw seminar with Michael. First a couple callouts. The MASW is an awesome place to learn. I have met some wonderful woodworkers and life long friends there and this week was no exception. Its a first rate operation and the instructors, facilities, food are all first class. Michael Fortune is not only a world renowned wood worker but one of the nicest funniest people I have had the pleasure of working with. Tonight's post will be quick becuase I am tired lol and I have many pics to sort through MASW is located just outside Indianapolis IN Here is a pic of the Michael Fortune #1 Chair these are done in solid Ebony with real silver and mother of pearl inlays. My chairs will be done in walnut and then ebonized. This pic is of a walnut chair like the ones we are making in class, its not assembled so that we can take it apart and see how everything fits together. As you can see the chair has curves everywhere of the 19 pieces that make up the chair only 3 do not have compound curves. Here are some of the many jigs and templates required to make the chair This pic shows the chair parts. From the top down: back chair legs, back slats (all 5 are on this drying form), and the arms. all of these parts were steam bent. Next you have the front legs, the front seat stretcher, crest rail, and bottom rail, and finally the seat frame. at this point all the joinery is cut in the non steamed parts and the shaping has begun.
    11 points
  36. Niagara falls at sunset.
    11 points
  37. Well this has been on my to do list for awhile, and I'm finally back to having time in the workshop. As a High School coach for baseball, spring can be a very hectic time, one reason I've been missing in action on this site the last few months. Well the season finally wrapped up and I'm ready for some alone time in the shop. I've been wanting to make a couch for a while, but my usually agreeable wife has not been sold on the idea. She usually is very happy with everything I build, but a wood framed couch with cushions is one area she has been resistant. Now I was overly impressed with @h3nry's upholstered couch, but I was not ready to leap that far in with this build. I was holding the line at a "Madmen" inspired piece of furniture, which I have truly come to admire and I truly love to build. I think the MCM stuff really shines when it comes to pieces you sit in and this was what I wanted to build, except for my lovely wife. Her main complaint was that the arms would be uncomfortable to recline against when one puts their legs up on the couch to read or watch TV. Now I had planned on a loveseat first, but this is where my wife usually sits to read or watch TV, hence her concern for comfort. In the same room we have a full size couch which she rarely uses. One night, she made a fatal mistake, she commented on how the couch was looking a little ragged. That was all the opening I needed, I said I'll handle it and when I'm done I'm predicting you'll ask for a matching loveseat. Now I've got to deliver....... I'm looking at a low slung couch, sculpted arms and sides. The back will be about 29" high without the cushions and it will be approx 71" long. The seat will recline at a 4/5 degree angle perpendicular to the floor and the back rest will sit at a 100 degree angle from the seat. there will be a middle support roughly shaped like the sides but with flat areas for joining the seat frames So off to the shop and my "digital design" program, graph paper. After a few attempts and a lot of erasing this is a side profile of the couch; I've played around with programs for design but I do really like this graph paper, once drawn up I cut out the pieces from the paper and make templates, easy in my mind, and a full sized visual. Of course it has it's limitations, that I understand. Once the templates are made I retrace on a new piece of paper and retain the full sized pic. The middle support was made by tracing the main pieces on another sheet and then altering areas that need altering. Here's the templates; Now I'm trying to keep most of my joints at 90 degrees to the floor, or base of the chair. this will make rectangular blanks ideal for creating tight joints. Here's the back leg and you can see that once the blank is sized I line up the joint areas to the side of the blank and make sure the bottom of the leg matches the base of the blank; And the front leg; And the blanks "put together" prior to cutting on the bandsaw. This just is a check to make sure things line uo; Free floating tenons (dominos) for joinery, 4 for the back leg to stretcher joint and two for the front leg stretcher joint. So the sides went together well, now to the middle support. Here I have two flat areas for the seat frame; So before gluing I use the L fence to cut these lines; And here I left a little extra at the front leg, I'll clean this up after gluing; And here is how the middle support relates to the side, you can see the flat areas clearly here that will support the seat fram; The back frame will be in two pieces and be glued to the inside edge of the sides and both sides of the middle support flush to the flat area. Here I completed the cut to line up the front leg, thanks to the L fence again. This pic also shows the middle leg against the side leg more clearly and I struck a line on the inside surface of the side to indicate where the bottom of the seat frame will rest; On to some shaping, here's a side without the arm yet sculpted; And here are all three pieces posing for a pic, sides and middle with lines struck on each to indicate frame locations; Next it will be back frame fabrication and front under the seat support fabrication. Then on to the arms and glue up of those pieces. For the seat frame I am hoping to do that in one panel, approx 68" long. That will be the most challenging part I think. Getting the long pieces to that frame true and square will be a challenge. The look from the front will be much nicer if it is in one piece or I'd do it in two. We'll see how that progresses. I hope you guys find this build interesting and I hope my wife finds it comfortable.
    11 points
  38. Well, this has been one long (time wise) and very heavy project All that is left to be done is drill the 3/4" dog holes and put some finish on it. The Bench it replaced...... This vise is awesome to use..... I even got the grain to match up on the sliding tail vise which simply means I lucked out
    11 points
  39. It was Saturday but due to a premature baby for the scheduled officiant I was honored to marry my youngest Oh and a little woodworking project too
    11 points
  40. Hello Fellas, It's been a while! I am building a record cabinet for a client. They wanted a record cabinet for their records because his dad passed and left him all of his records. As such, the records have sentimental value to him, and he wants them on display. Here is the design. The wood for the project is going to be ebony veneer, Fiddleback Sycamore veneer and holly. Lets get into this! First, I am joining all of the veneer too MDF. There are some major downsides to MDF though, the main one being weight and sag. So, the solution I came up with is making my own lumber core plywood. It will be 1/2 Poplar sandwiched between two sheets of 1/4 MDF. Glued together with Ultra Cat resin glue. I actually stole this idea from Craig Thirdeau. To start, I milled the lumber to strips of 2 1/4. This relieved some of the stress of the boards. I discarded any boards that I thought might cause a problem in the future. Then, glued them together. Then, I skip planed them down to 3/4". I let these sit for a couple days to warp again. After that, I glued on a piece of MDF . I then brought it down to its final thickness of 1/2. I ran it through the sander to remove the snipe from the planer and glued the MDF Sheets on using a veneer press. I applied this same idea to all three of the shelves. Next, I drew out my design to figure out the proportions of the veneer. Mainly looking for the size of the borders. Because I can't find any Holly veneer, I made some the same thickness as the ebony. I achieved this by cutting thin strips with my bandsaw and making a small jig to run through my sander until I got the strips down to 1/64. More to follow once my vacuum press opens back up, and I can start to work on the veneer.
    11 points
  41. 11 points
  42. I had the pleasure of a visit today from @Ronn W on his way back from woodworking school, great time, much wood talk, and a great lunch provided by my wife. Thanks for stopping by Ronn, always good to see you and talk wood stuff.
    11 points
  43. for hand surgery. I had a locking thumb that was painful. The surgery was 2 hours ago and is already feeling better.I have flexibility already. But doc says no work until the stitches are out.
    11 points
  44. Today I remade the box while still not perfect I can at least live with this one. 1 2 3 4 - you can see this one is still off, I should have changed my bandsaw blade to a new one but it will work. Next up I cut a dado for the inset top panel and hand fit it using a shooting board and #5 plane With that done I moved on to a bevel detail on the top and the bottom of each side. I clamped a quick zero clearance piece down to the router table to insure a smooth cut. The panels are square with about an 1/8" 45 bevel top and bottom. The pick makes it look a bit off but that's just my poor photography skills not the panel. Then I did a dry fit prior to glue up Just need to wait a couple hours for the top to dry, after taping it off and spraying it with a couple coats of lacquer, then I will glue it up.
    11 points
  45. I took these 3 picture in 2018 on our trip Ireland. Dunluce Castle, Northern Ireland, UK Kylemore Abbey, Co. Galway, Ireland Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin Ireland Believe it or not, these 3 are all taken on a Motorola G5 cell phone. I was contacted by the Ireland tourism people asking permission to use these photos in some brochures they were making after I posted them on a Irish Travel forum.
    11 points
  46. Next I did the draw bore pins a la Mike Pekovich. It's really handy to have multiple squares - one for the edge standoff, one for the top hole and one for the bottom. You may wonder why I have two Starrett 4" combo squares. I "lost" one last fall and after weeks of looking for it and finally buying a new one, found it in my apron - in the wrong pocket. I learned this little trick from a FW podcast a couple of years ago. I got a set of center punches from HF for ?? $12. The pin holes are ¼". With the boards clamped together, insert the 1/32" smaller size punch into the hole with it pressed up against the edge of the hole closest to the apron and punch it. This locates an index point just inside and toward the apron. Once drilled, it draws the tenon into the mortise. The long side aprons are close to 6 feet, so I just let gravity do the work for them. After drilling them out I used a countersink by hand to ease the edge so the pin could seat without crushing the fibers.
    11 points
  47. As you guys know I'm in the shop a lot, and as a result I generate a lot of scraps, mostly designated for the woodstove. That has always bothered me because some of the wood I burn is really nice stuff, it's just odd shaped or too small to do much with. Lately I've donated alot of my scraps to a few young budding woodworkers. This gets rid of a good amt of stuff and they are so happy to have it. But I still have that pile of wood, I'm sure we all have it, that pile of some nice pieces we hope we will find a use for in the future. Well my pile just seems to keep on growing despite my efforts to off load stuff. So a few months ago I started in earnest to look for some small projects to use some of my scraps. Since the ever popular reindeer seem to catch so much attention, I started by focusing on other animals I could make with my bandsaw or lathe. Some searches on Etsy, and I found some neat little projects. I want to make clear these are copies of things I saw that were thought of by smarter people than myself. I have no intention on selling and I hope if any of those people see this post that they will consider the quote from Oscar Wilde, "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery that mediocrity can pay to greatness". So here's what I've been playing with; Pengiuns, a nice addition to my reindeer herd. These were done on the lathe after a simple glue up of any dark wood and light wood. The "beak" is a 1/8th" brass rod cut and shaped; Spring Chickens, again done on the lathe, the "comb" on the top of the head is turned, cut to rough shape on the bandsaw, spindle sander to get to final shape, small vertical cuts then rasp work to make the spikes, and finally some red flocking. The "beaks" are either shaped 1/8th" kabob skewers or the shaped brass rod. These samples are turned from cherry, walnut, maple and pear; Finally, a few simple but elegant birds, cut out using a bandsaw, spindle sander to shape, and handsanding to finish. The "eyes" are nothing more than an 1/8th" hole. I'm hoping some of you out there have some simple fun projects like this to share as my "pile" is still a pile, altough slightly smaller. I've gotten into the habit of always having a few of these little projects in the works that I can play with during glueup or on finishing days. Hope this was interesting to some of you out there.
    11 points
  48. Hello, everyone. I'd like to introduce myself. I'm an amateur furniture maker/designer. I live in Oceanside, CA, about 35 miles north of San Diego. I haven't been able to do much in the last year due to Covid-19 isolation issues (age and underlying medical issues), so I haven't had any opportunity to buy supplies. But I've just received my 2nd vaccination, so I hope life will be returning to some normalcy. I've included some images of my last project, a dining room side table of 8/4 Ash. The large dovetails were interesting to make and required construction of a hefty jig to hold the (heavy!) top and sides in alignment for marking, sawing chiseling and routing. The inspiration came from a piece in Architectural Digest. I don't know who's home was being showcased, but there was a Maple table in one picture that I liked. I made my table strictly from memory. When I was finished I found the picture again. I was surprised to realize I had over-estimated the thickness of the top and sides. Also I thought I had remembered that the dovetails had interesting spacing. That detail must have come from some other piece that merged into memory as they were just rigidly laid out without any variation. In the end, I liked my design better. The dovetails are sized and spaced according to a Fibonacci sequence. I didn't take any pictures during construction, but I'll be doing a similar piece soon and I'll do that then. Cheers, Rich
    11 points
  49. i didn't want you folks to think i was just slacking off, the first pictures are a couple of easels 12" X 14" for daughter and granddaughter with storage inside and adjustable to any angle, the next are called a Spurtle, yeah i know i never heard of them either just like the Charcuterie boards i made, never heard of them either, they are about 11" long and 1 1/2" and 1 1/4" wide, i like them because they are quick to make and make great gifts, don't use too much wood and are finished with mineral oil, as usual thanks for looking
    11 points
  50. Wood porn! I am building a walnut bathroom. Only one door and 10 drawers. The door will have this curly claro walnut, book matched panels. I will post the work when I get further along. This kind of wood makes me giddy.
    11 points