drzaius

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drzaius last won the day on November 26

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About drzaius

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    : Calgary, Alberta
  • Woodworking Interests
    Home reno to furniture making

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  1. And in Tuscany they don't put any salt in their bread and are damned proud of it. Yuck. Actually, the bread is delicious if you sprinkle a little salt in your oil & balsamic before dipping the bread.
  2. While we're speaking (figuratively, of course) of jointers & planers, the Europeans have the right idea in calling the jointer a planer & the planer is a thicknesser. It makes sense because that's what they do. Our names for them make no sense at all.
  3. Yes they are. I just had to order a switch module for my Fein Multimaster & it was about $80.
  4. Bushings or bearings can be used for pattern work, but the offset that you have with a bushing can make the math infinitely more complex. The only time I use a bushing is when I want a specific offset that can be had by choosing the right combination of bit & bushing. I rarely use bushings & haven't had occasion to need one in the router table, but that time may come.
  5. Even with drywall? I did not know that. The 1/2" lightweight drywall that's so common today is hardly stronger than cardboard.
  6. Haha! Been there and that's not much of an exageration.
  7. I stagger all butt joints, but with Tom's method, I don't think it would be of any benefit.
  8. Yikes! I wonder if it was at least on a GFI breaker.
  9. Just to be clear, I do agree that board feet would be the most accurate, IF referring to the square feet X depth of cut. I like the bushel idea too. Just thought of another irritating term: "vertical grain fir". For some reason it usually used for fir, not other woods. And what the hell does that mean any way? When it's a tree, yes the grain is vertical, as is when used in a vertical orientation. But you spend all that extra cash of VG fir, take it home, lay it on the bench, & suddenly it's not vertical grain anymore
  10. I've been biting my tongue for ages on this, but in a covid pandemic induced fit of pedantry, I'm gonna vent here. Way too often, people refer to how much they have used their planer or jointer by saying something like "I've run x number of board feet through it". That is a completely meaningless statement, unless you are stating the actual quantity of wood that has been turned into chips by said planer or jointer. Would it not be better to use "square feet" as a metric of how much work the machine has done? I'm not trying to offend any of the offenders, but it has become pervasive
  11. I think red oak looks great painted. That hint of grain that shows through is quite attractive. I made a fireplace surround for my daughter out of red oak & sprayed it gloss black. It turned out beautifully & is much more interesting than if it was perfectly smooth.
  12. I have the Milwaukee 5625, which I bought to go in the router table. It's way nicer in the hand & smoother than my smaller & lighter PC router. In the router table it will take far bigger cuts without bogging down or doing that awful chattering thing that so many routers do when working too hard.
  13. Good tip about the glue on paper tears. For the small holes I use the handle of the putty knife to depress the edge of the hole, but larger tears can be real challenge. Not priming over mud can be a big mistake. Non-primer paint does not always bond well with mud & it can just flake away. I'm dealing with a bit of that now repainting my house. The painter that did the media room didn't use primer & there were several places where the paint didn't stick well. That's part of the reason I'm DIYing it this time.
  14. Acme Tools has it in stock. Several outlets in Canada as well, if that's feasible.
  15. Wheels rely on an exact fit between the hub & the hole in the wheel for a full strength connection between the two. The lug nuts don't do the whole job. I think tape will either peel off or compress some, which will give sloppy results. Getting a layer of tape the exact thickness will be a challenge as well. Remember, any error in tape thickness will be doubled in the final diameter of the hole. Do it right & take the wheels to a machine shop & have them bore out the centers.