Levi Rathje

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About Levi Rathje

  • Rank
    Apprentice Poster
  • Birthday 03/11/1976

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Eldridge Iowa
  • Woodworking Interests
    Furniture of all types

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    @levi.rathje
  1. Miles11we that's simple wiring it will be easy. Just find a dry spot to put the invertor.
  2. That is the result of internal stress in the board. Or it can be from moisture differential if the board from center of the board to the outside. This is why it is generally best to mill off each side evenly. This isn't uncommon when resawing, at least not for me on wide boards.
  3. The pore filling process is used on open pored woods if you want it to achieve a smooth surface. Other woods besides oak can be filled (ash,& walnut are a couple). Any wood that has an open grain will have an unsmooth surface if coated with a film finish. The finish will soak down into the pores and a film will be built on the surface where the pores aren't. The glossier the surface the worse it will be. The pore filler will fill up the open grain and allow the film finish to go over the pores and look smooth. Red Oak and Ash have very large pores and must be filled if you want a smooth glossy finish. White oak and some of the other woods with smaller pores can be filled with finish. After a couple of coat and sanding back they will fill the grain and yield a smooth surfacce. This is not required if you are going to use a oil finish. You can probably get by with out doing it up to a satin finish but it really depends how the pores are. If you are planning on a semi gloss or high gloss you need to do th0is if you want a smooth even finish. I hope I answered your question. When in doubt fill the grain for glossy finishes.
  4. Sandpaper on anything that fits inside the curve. Deep well sockets work on smaller curves.
  5. Sandpaper on anything that fits inside the curve. Deep well sockets work on smaller curves.
  6. Hello from just north of Davenport. I am always glad to see another person from the area.
  7. There needs to be a power inverter if you are looking to run 110 volt equipment off of a 12volt battery. Theses are often used in motor homes and by truck drivers. The problem is the battery will get run down quickly if you run anything with much amperage draw. You may need to have the truck running rto keep enough power to the outlet. The inverter is rated in watts and you can overheat it if you pull to much power. Look for it the cab somewhere they don't like water. If you need to replace it the bigger inverter the more they cost.
  8. The pulleys drive- driven ratio would have to be changed to compensate for the motor that's only turning half the speed. To change this and get the speed you need you are going to to have to increase drive size and possibly reduce the driven side(arbor). This will in effect make the motor gearing higher but it comes with the trade off of power loss through mechanical advantage. Optimal performance is 1:1 ratio for power and torque. Just imagine it as a 10 speed bike same effect just different power transfer mechanism.
  9. I have the same thing, works great. You am get 3 grits of paper and put a board down and sand away for not much of an investment. I do think if you are going to do a lot of curved pieces go get the Ridged spindle/ belt sander I have heard really good things about it.
  10. I have the same thing, works great. You am get 3 grits of paper and put a board down and sand away for not much of an investment. I do think if you are going to do a lot of curved pieces go get the Ridged spindle/ belt sander I have heard really good things about it.
  11. I work for a trucking company and there are always pallets around. I don't use them they are thin and are full of nails. Oak,pine and poplar are common but they use the bottom of the barrel boards to build them also they are fill of dirt and rocks and sand from getting slid on the ground.
  12. I am with triple H go for the router. Get a router that has a through the table adjustment if you don't want to buy a lift. Also get a good edge guide, and speed control and you should be able to accomplish most things between having it freehand and mounted in a table.
  13. Straight edge and a router with a pattern bit will also work. A piece of mdf trim works pretty good if you clamp or double stick tape it to the face of the board and run the bearing down the edge.
  14. If you look at the way a collet works it has 4 parts that pinch down on the bit. When yo tighten the collet probably 2 of the wedges of the collet will be if the flutes of the bit and won't hold anything. If the wedges of the collect clamp down on the cutting endge and may break because carbide is brittle.
  15. Have you tried a 3/8" in wrench? 3/8 is slightly smaller than a 10mm and might be able to grab the sides enough to get it. Snap on flank drive are the best the grab the sides not the corners. Otherwise the needle nose vice grips of a small narrow pair. The only other thing would be if you can get a small pair of channel locks in and orient them so they get tighter as you turn them.I realize space is an issue just throwing a few things out to try before the welder option is a last resort. Good luck