Tom King

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Everything posted by Tom King

  1. I'm not sure. I guess if the Sun charges the battery enough, it will light up. I don't know when I will have a chance to take a photo at night. It would have to be from the lake, and I haven't been out there at night, for years. Pam, and I used to do a lot of sailing at night, but the place has really been built up, since then, and too many idiots operating boats. When I was building our house, in 1980, we lived in a tent on the lake, with no houses in sight. We'd have the whole lake to ourselves, during the week, and any week nights. We kept a Laser rigged up, and laid over on the beach. All we had to do was flip it upright, and take off. Things are a Lot different here now.
  2. My Sears compressor, that I bought new in 1974, is that color.
  3. The metal looks awfully thin on that tank. Color looks kind of like a Speedaire, but I'd be surprised if that were so. Wonder if the pop-off valve was working, and several other questions.
  4. The solar cell is built into the top of the light. It doesn't get direct Sun much, but plenty to make it operate. The light is just hanging in there, and is easy to replace the whole light fixture. There is one 1/4-20 wingnut, with built in washer that holds the top shut. There are some recessed holes under the top that hold a bunch of spares. I told them not to chase one down the roof if they dropped it. The glasswork on the roof is not real pretty, but like we say in building theater stuff, the "30 foot rule" applies. Roof slope of the cupola is exactly double of the 18 degree slope on the boathouse roof.
  5. People are stopping by our house today, giving me compliments on it. The 4th of July weekend is always crazy at the lake. Everyone that has a place is here, along with multiple guests. I wouldn't live here if it was like this all the time. If you look closely, you may be able to see the stainless steel hinges. The roof hinges to access the solar light. Most cupolas have a copper roof. The roof turns dark, and it doesn't really stand out. I thought white would be more showy, and could be see from way up the lake. This roof is Marine Baltic Birch plywood, with a couple of layers of fiberglass cloth over it, painted with Sherwin Williams Emerald Gloss. There are many Great Blue Herons on the lake.
  6. When you order the Miter 5000, the miter gauge, and sled come in separate boxes, just like if you bought them separately. My sled, that I bought at a Black Friday sale, a couple of years ago, is still in the box. It's a great miter gauge.
  7. Most members here are hobbyist woodworkers. You may get some leads by posting under the General forum on the Forestryforum. Most people there saw local wood, but someone may have some contacts.
  8. My 24" Centauro has flat wheels. It works great with 1" blades. The teeth hang off the front edge of the wheels. All the smaller ones have crowned wheels, and the blades are run mostly centered on the wheels. I don't think it's worth a lot of time even thinking about which is better. I would imagine narrow blades would shorten the life of flat tires, but don't know. I don't worry about it. I run them like they were intended.
  9. If you are spraying them with airless, I've used both of these with great success. I've never sprayed them another way, that required thinning. https://www.sherwin-williams.com/homeowners/products/emerald-urethane-trim-enamel https://www.sherwin-williams.com/homeowners/products/proclassic-waterborne-interior-acrylic-enamel If using Semi-Gloss, I like the way the Emerald Urethane looks, a little better. For Satin, I'd probably use Pro Classic.
  10. I hate to think what the value cost of that little pile of framing materials is.
  11. I just lay the block on a sheet of sandpaper, and cut a little off the edge with a utility knife, on scrap wood. It's a little narrower than a fourth of a sheet.
  12. I built this topdresser drag with that saw.
  13. That saw should have a little table for it, and is easily converted to a vertical saw. Raise it all the way up, and there should be some sort of a lever, or arm to put in place to lock it vertical. Mine in a yardsale Enco. I used it not too long ago both horizontally, and vertically, to build a base for a welder. Here is a picture of the Enco in vertical mode. That black arm you see below the table is the lock to hold it securely vertical. These saws make a much prettier cut than an abrasive blade chop saw. I needed the vertical cuts to get the corners of this base to fit together before I welded them.
  14. I have about 140 tool boxes, in individual cubbies. Each one has a name on it. One is labeled Shim .
  15. My only suggestion is to make the surround around the refrigerator to be easily adjustable in the future. In our kitchen, I've cut the cabinet above twice. It now has no bottom shelf, and the doors have been modified both times. If I had left a 4" face board, it would have been a lot easier, and better to still have a cabinet bottom in that one. We've been here 41 years, and on our third refrigerator. No two were exactly the same height, even though width is pretty standard.
  16. This saved me a lot of time, and everything came out just right, first try. https://www.blocklayer.com/pyramid-calculator.aspx
  17. When looking for the older picture of my truck fender job, I stumbled across more pictures of this job. There are some more in one of the other cameras, but they will come later. I call this a combination of woodworking, and carpentry. I used the Wixey cube, and a carpenters square. For hip rafters, you use 17 in place of the 12 for the rise, and run of common rafters. I marked the first one off with a sharp pencil, and set some temporary fences on the sliding miter saw, because the saw wouldn't set to cut an angle that extreme. The slope of the boathouse roof is only 18 degrees. I wanted the cupola roof to be some steeper, so I doubled the 18, to 36. I used an online calculator for building a pyramid, that gives you every angle needed. The Wixey cube was used to set the table saw tilt to the exact tenth of a degree. I glued, and pinned the pieces in place, then came back the next day, and ran some screws in. The roof needs to be strong because there is a solar light inside, and the roof needs to hinge to be able to access the light. I hated to use the wood with the knots, but it was the last of the thick, really dry treated lumber I had at hand. The parts are 2-1/4" thick, because I wanted more surface area on the the angled tops of the hip rafters. When I run across the other pictures, I'll come back, and add them.
  18. I used this for body filler. It's a flexible epoxy, designed for plastic autobody parts like bumper covers. It looks just like JB Weld, coming in two tubes, and the way you mix it. I really wasn't expecting it to work very well, but it really is flexible, and you can still sand it. It doesn't sand as easily as all the Bondo variants, but it's really not too bad. I say they did a really good job engineering it. It's the gray that you see in the pre-primered picture. The yellow is the bare plastic.
  19. I hadn't realized how long it had been since I did this. It was right in pollen season, so I didn't do any painting. Finally, this morning I sprayed it with primer. It had been like the first picture since I first worked on it. I was worried about UV having a bad effect on the exposed plastic, so I sprayed it with epoxy primer. There are still a few imperfections to hit with filler, but at least it's protected from the Sun. I didn't use any polyester in this job. Every step is done with some sort of epoxy.
  20. I think they must be expecting. They just built an addition on their house.
  21. I hope you charged the units before R410a doubled in price. I bought a 25 pound tank, about a month ago, and just noticed, by chance on ebay, that the price has doubled since then.
  22. I built our kitchen cabinets out of a Walnut log about that size.
  23. Don't know how long it will last: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072M31RYC/ref=sspa_dk_detail_2?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B072M31RYCp13NParams&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUExRVgxSFBBQlkyMlpUJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMzY3Mjk1MTFCMjdOTTlJR1NXSiZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUExMDA3NzU2M1IxQTVCTU05QkdBUSZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2RldGFpbDImYWN0aW9uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl
  24. Since I was installing the one for my Mother's Suite, in a hurry, by myself, I bought one of these, and am glad I did. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B010M261GW/?coliid=I55WJJMP6996O&colid=2P8GBP5SU4LS7&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it
  25. I use the 3.36 too, but also keep a layer of plywood on the tops. I just lift the plywood off when I use it, which might be months between uses, and put it back on when I'm done. I'm sure there are a couple of years between 3.36 applications, or maybe more.