Pete Bennett

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Everything posted by Pete Bennett

  1. Welcome to the family. If you can afford it buy extra boards. You will not regret it. Re-sawing and thicknessing almost always throws up something unless you are very sure of your stock, it's EMC and its stability. This is always an area of calculated guesses. I've had three and four inch Oak here that I've had for years, flat as the proverbial, straight as an arrow. But, as it passes through the re-saw it either twists or thinks its a banana. Sometimes however, its beautiful!! but, that's the bonus. Good luck with the project let us know how you get on. Pete
  2. Risky sounds a good one. But I seem to remember some time back a technique known as Carbonizing this may be the same thing but, to be honest I'm not sure. There's bound to be some one here who does know for sure. Pete
  3. I use absolutely gallons of Danish Oil over time and it is exactly as Marc says. The only product I've ever used that appears to be indestructible is 'Rustins Plastic Coating' it is actually not quite so awful as it sounds and is probably the best thing available for Bar tops that are regularly covered in Alcohol spills, it can be anything from Matt to the highest possible gloss. But, I would never use it for any 'fine' furniture it gives a too thick looking coat. It's always best to try as many samples as you can using different finishes applied in different ways and from one coat up to as many as you feel fit. It's one of those things that years of experience can help with, but, as new finishes and techniques are always appearing, I find it best to take a few scraps from my firewood box now and again and play around with what ever I have around. You'd be amazed how much fun you can have, and sometimes, you hit on a winner. For a while at least, until something else appears that seems to be the panacea, but nothing as yet has been invented that answers all situations, timbers, and, above all CLIENTS. Sorry not to be of more help. Pete
  4. Like I said I love the table and the contrast in colour is remarkable. I too started out to be an Architect, but went into designing and making furniture instead. It was more an observation than a real criticism. Sometimes these ripples appear to disappear, if you take my meaning when you give everything a good sanding, but, sometimes they do re-appear, as these seem to have done. Didn't mean to offend. Pete
  5. Bob is absolutely right. I no longer own a scrub plane and do virtually all my prep by machine. But, for over forty years I did the lot by hand! I used a 32" wooden plane with a camber on any board long enough to warrant it. followed by metal 22" x 2 1/2" plane to get to thickness and no twist. I may later use a scraper and very rarely sand paper during the finishing stage but that would be it. Well done Bob. He's also dead on concerning toothing blades. Hell it must take hours just to plane out the grooves!
  6. Bob is absolutely right. I no longer own a scrub plane and do virtually all my prep by machine. But, fot over forty years I did the lot by hand! I used a 32" wooden plane with a camber on any board long enough to warrant it. followed by metal 22" x 2 1/2" plane to get to thickness and no twist. I may later use a scraper and very rarely sand paper during the finishing stage but that would be it. Well done Bob. He's also dead on concerning toothing blades. Hell it must take hours just to plane out the grooves!
  7. Check the bit is sharp and make sure you have enough clearance between the drill and the chisel (about 1/16" min.) should do it, but a little more won't hurt. Check your drill speed as this is almost always the cause of burning. If none of this works then try a good quality drill bit there are two patterns. The Japanese pattern has one cutting spur and the traditional 'Cabinet maker's' pattern has two. I don't know what they cost in the STates but here I can get them from Axminster Power Tools for a 1/2" it is £22.90 for the Japanese and £23.30 for the traditional.
  8. Absolutely!!! As an apprentice I used to be given the job of driving any screws that had to be driven. With Brass screws then, you had to drill a shank hole then a pilot hole usually a 1/16" smaller than the actual thread size, then a measured counter sink hole, then I had to dip them into 'Vasalene' Jelly before driving them. Battery screwdrivers didn't exist then. I'm sure if they had we would never have used them. Infact I'd never use them with brass screws. Ok! I know they were driven by hand but with bras screws always drill pilot holes and coat the screw with vasalene or soft wax. Even pre-screwing with a steel screw is no guarantee as the threads are often completely different.
  9. Lovely table. But is that just the tiniest suggestion of plane ripple beginning to show on the drawer front?
  10. Brilliant John. Do you remember the one they did with Dinosaurs?
  11. I don't know about insurance policies. cos I utterly distrust each and every one of them. But, if I were veneering any substrate that thin I'd definitely back it off no matter what. On thick substrates it is often no problem but a 1/8" veneer on 1/4" MDF I've never bet on a horse in my life but I reckon distortion would be massive odds on favourite.
  12. I have clicked Ply because it is my much preferred material for jigs but, I have used 18mm MDF for an awful lot of jigs as well, particularly when making follower jigs for the spindle moulder as I find there is less chance of snagging which does sometimes occur when inner laminates of ply splinter off or as so often happens when you slice into your nice clean sheet you discover gaps and materials used for filling that are not apparent until you make the cut. Also as almost everything I do is a one off the jig is usually short lived and discarded after the piece is made.
  13. Hi 13% is a fairly good air dry moisture reading, depending on where you are. If its quarter sawn I'm surprised it's cupping so much. However, 1/8" veneers are common, and as Paul says no problem if you balance it with a similar thickness of virtually any other veneer, but, try to make sure they are both at 13% if poss. In the good old days a lot of furniture was veneered with 3/16" veneer on to solid Oak carcases and some of that stuff was done around 4,000 years ago and still survives. Admittedly it spent almost all that time in a very controlled environment beneath several thousand tons of stone Pyramid. I never use commercial veneers unless it's either a fantastic burr or truly exotic wood not available otherwise. I always cut at 3mm which is pretty near exactly 1/8" and the only problems I've ever had have been caused by me. So go for it and good luck.
  14. Love your party light idea. I reckon I'd best get on to some of these ideas Thank you very much. Pete
  15. Great proportions and choice of wood. Add to that the craftsmanship and you cannot fail to produce a great piece of furniture. I love the taper in the legs just the right degree. Thanks for sharing
  16. Love the stripey trousers. Your little lady is a very lucky girl to have such a dad. When you're not making for her, do you ever make anything for your self or even your WIFE. Looks a great design, very stable and much more fun than a dead lookalike horse that everyone is scared to rock the hell out of incase they do some damage. Kids hate to be given something and then constantly warned not to use it incase they break it. Brilliant!
  17. This was machined on a Spindle moulder (shaper) Quite frankly I wouldn't go near a three inch cove like that with any Router. I have the biggest router Elu ever made called a MOF11 and I wouldn't attempt it even with that. You could play around with a smaller cove cutter making successive passes and so on but, I wouldn't want to waste that much time because even when you've done there will be hours of scraping and sanding before you achieve the right quality of finish. Three inch cove cutters are common for spindle moulders and would certainly make a better job. In minutes. If you know anyone nearby with a shaper let them do it.
  18. thanks for that I must admit we had thought of pasta tubes but the piggy bank idea is particularly appealing great thanks
  19. Thanks a bunch. I only have an A3 printer so this is going to be great.
  20. Thanks guys. You've already given us plenty of ideas. Don't worry John about being phallic I won't say what my friend's wife first came up with!!! Love the chair idea Mr. Beechwood could really go with that one. Next to tables I love making chairs. Wondered about wind chimes but have yet to test the safety of such large chunks crashing into each other. Please keep them coming. You never know I may even start posting pictures.
  21. Thanks. I suppose I should have remembered all my Classics.
  22. I have just been given 150 Pyrex Glass tubes approx 14" x 2 1/2" diameter and been asked by the donor to come up with ideas and designs to turn them into something useful and or saleable. So far we have come up with the obvious, turning them into sconces and hanging them on the wall but I'd like to think in a more imaginative way. Any ideas guys? Please!
  23. Like I said yesterday, this 'old timer' doesn't even own a TV anywhere! And who the hell was Pandora?