woodydixon

Members
  • Content Count

    8
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

1 Neutral

Profile Information

  • Woodworking Interests
    cabinet making

Recent Profile Visitors

118 profile views
  1. No problem Chip. I'm not entirely clear on what you are showing me. Did you cut the rabbit all the way across the front at first and then fill in the front of the middle part with a scrap piece to line up with the edge of the blade? When cut mine I just chiseled out each side separately. Also, are the cutters mounted straight up and down in the holder or are they slanted so that the inlay would be tapered? I have used wood screws to hold the cutters but it looks like the LN version has some sort of cap or barrel nut on the back. Would did you use? Mine is cutting better when I finally was able to get a burr on the cutter and I started using 1/16 inch inlay. Thanks for your help. Woody
  2. @Chip Sawdust Just following up Chip to see if you have ideas. Woody
  3. Chip, I have read this thread with great interest since I am trying to learn how to inlay myself. Your work is very impressive and you are way ahead of me. One problem I am having is with the lie nielsen style thicknesser. I got the cutters as you did from LN and made my own thicknesser. However, I am not able to get shavings like Steve Latta. I assumed the cutters would not need to have a burr burnished from the factory. Were your's sharp enough? When I pull the stringing through I get intermittent shavings, some dust, and catches which leave the surface rough and uneven. I also wasnt sure which side of the blade faces out, the flat or beveled. I tried both ways with no appreciable difference. I ran one blade bevel over sandpaper to raise a burr as I saw in one of Steve's videos but that helped only marginally. If I do need to burnish a new burr what method should i use? Sorry to have so many questions. Thanks for any help you can provide. Woody