collinb

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Posts posted by collinb

  1. (apparently in my case) Wood allergies.

    The only thing new this campout compared to others is that I burned up a bunch of excess poplar planks. Because they were there.

    Hadn't heard about these allergies before, but apparently quite a problem. Went to both my dentist and (the diagnosis) oral surgeon this week to see what was going on in my mouth. If it were on just one side he would have leaned toward shingles. He also said that he sees 2-3 cases of mouth rashes from camping every year.

    So now I have a 10- to 14-day bit of misery.

    The lesson: Be aware of your fire woods and the smoke you may breathe just a little too much of. Less-than-pleasant may be your fortune.

     

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  2. A couple years ago I made this open entry closet. But that tall door is moving. (I know, it’s the even-layer count issue.) Today’s compensation is to use a rare earth magnet to hold the door closed. It stands just a little proud of the door surface as it contacts a screw in the frame. I may put a piece of edge banding over the screw head … but maybe not.

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  3. On 1/31/2018 at 2:58 PM, Marmotjr said:

    About twenty years or so ago, I worked in a small computer repair shop, way before I was into woodworking.  A commercial customer of ours brought in their PC to get some upgrades done to it.  Apparently it was a wood shop and I would now swear they had it positioned right beside their planer's discharge vent.  It was making some weird noises when I booted it up to quickly check it over.   When I opened it up to get inside, it was about 3/4 full of dust and chips, some of which were on/in the cooling fans, which explained the noises.   The customer state it had been making those noises for years. 

    So yeah, a computer will do ok in a dusty environment, to a point.  And yes, it may have been 20 years ago, but the general designs in PC's hasn't changed much since then.  

    If you're really concerned, a cheap fix is to get dust filters for all your fans.  They are only a couple bucks each, and can easily be screwed in between the fan and the mount.  Most off the shelf machines might have one, maybe two fans, and the power supply would have another.  But the power supply fans usually blow out, and the other's blow in (usually), so you'd really only have to cover the easily accessible ones.  

    And opening the case and giving it a once over with the air hose would be a good idea.  

    The worst part of it is the screen.  My machine is in the shop, and a thin layer slowly forms on the screen.  One light touch and the dirt is then very noticeable, requiring a full wipe down.     

    20 years ago the fans were larger and could tolerate larger chips and more dust. Today's smaller fans would, I suspect, get blocked up more easily.

    Also 20 years ago systems were more concerned about hard drive heat. If you've not upgraded to a SSD, do so. It will cut the heat generated inside the laptop and make for less stress on the laptop or desktop computer cooling system. Plus, a good one is more reliable than a mechanical drive.

     

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  4. On 4/19/2022 at 9:44 AM, drzaius said:

    It has an induction motor, so no brushes. It's running so it's not likely start winding or switch issues, if it even has them. That leaves the bearings. Does the overload trip out after a while? If it is running slow there would be an overload condition. If it needs Delta specific parts, chances aren't great that they'll be available.

     

    On 4/19/2022 at 1:21 PM, wtnhighlander said:

    Looks like the same motor drives the cam action for oscillation as drives the spindle. Any chance the spindle end of the motor shaft is slipping on the actual spindle?

    It runs for a few seconds then slows down. Oscillation works just fine.

    The motor is not available. Even if it were that would be the price of a good used unit.

    I've decided to pick up a good used one tomorrow afternoon.

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  5. My Delta BOSS spindle sander was acquired used. Last time I powered it up it ran slow. Oscillation was good but the speed, not so much.

    Is it much trouble to tear into a motor like that (I've fixed a lot of things but have not opened a motor before) or is one better off ditching it?

    Press-fit bearings would be pain to deal with.

  6. On 4/15/2022 at 9:55 AM, Gary Beasley said:

    That leg looks basically like flatwork. Find a suitable cherry plank and trace the outline, cut it out and rout the contours. Hard part would be drilling matching dowel holes. I think what weakened it was too many holes too close together, not a great design.

    Cherry is by nature quite brittle. I considered cutting the offended part flat and adding a bevel into the main part of the leg and filling with a block accordingly. Epoxying it in rather than gluing. But I really didn't want to try to match the finish. It's like a walnut stain on cherry. I'd probably use a sander to match the contours instead of a router.

    Aligning the dowels wouldn't be too difficult.

     

     

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  7. We picked up some Pennsylvania House cherry chairs. Wife likes them. But one broke with a mistaken move. I can’t find the same chair nearby so I am tasked with fixing it if possible. My thought is to notch the leg and glue in a block. Reinforced with small dowels or something. 


    1. How might you do it?

    2. Is it worth the effort?

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  8. On 3/26/2022 at 6:53 PM, roughsawn said:

    Get the factory mobile base. I bought mine fall of '21, and used it quite a bit this winter. Love it.

    You may or may not want to upgrade the guide system. Sometimes the sparks coming off of the ceramic blows my mind...lol

    I used a file to flatten the weld spot as much as I could but there are still sparks. Definitely a good reason for dust collection.

  9. On 3/20/2022 at 12:08 PM, Chet said:

    On my 1412 there is a set screw to make fence adjustments parallel to the blade.  You loosen the two black knobs and make the fence adjustment with the set screw (red arrow) then re-tighten the knobs.  It might take a try or two to get were you need to be.

    My Laguna is about six years old.  I would hate to think they did away with the adjustment feature.

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    Thanks. Didn't see it in the instructions. Sure is loaded with blue Loctite, as it ought to be!

  10. Only one thing funky about alignment. I got the table-blade just fine. But fence-table or -blade is way off. Thinking of a wood shim.
     

    Also … dust collection connections. I have been using a friction connector for the table saw, jointer, router, and planer. But this 4” is apparently larger in diameter. How do you connect to it?

  11. I got it set up today. Quite the beast.

    I see only one short-coming in the design. Not sure about those plastic knobs on the guide adjustments. I've had plastics break on enough stuff over the years that they bother me.

    Also, what method do you use to flatten the saw blade weld point? Just a file for a few passes, perhaps?