ChrisG-Canada

Members
  • Content Count

    362
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

163 Excellent

About ChrisG-Canada

  • Rank
    Journeyman Poster
  • Birthday 11/14/1971

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    : Sarnia, Ontario, Canada
  • Woodworking Interests
    Furniture and other things made out of wood

Recent Profile Visitors

3730 profile views
  1. I have an Oneida V-3000 (3HP). I found a local(ish) supplier and got galvanized spiral wound round ducting. Available in many sizes and also got the elbows, tees, reducers, etc. from them. It’s not Nordfab so I connected each piece with short self-tapping screws (type used for wood stove vent piping) and then wrapped each seam with aluminum foil tape (not plastic or even cloth duct tape). I also took the time to use silicone caulking to make sure all the joints in fittings were air tight. According to a smoke test everything is sealed up and the system works great plus I have no concerns about accidentally collapsing any of the ducting.
  2. Did the epoxy cure properly? That’s the ‘proof’ everything was mixed properly.
  3. Yes, most pen kits use standard pen refills available from Amazon or your local office supply store (Staples, etc.).
  4. I’ve been making a few turned items (bowls, pens, etc.) and my wife wants to set up an Etsy store to sell them. Apparently I’ll be making a LOT more of them... Anyone here have experiences they’d like to share? Do you find Etsy to be useful? Is EBay or Amazon (or something else) better in your opinion? Anyone use some type of inventory management software to keep track of the items off-line? I could also set up a store using my website if that’s a better option. I always seem so be a big picture kind of thinker so in my idealized dream world I’d love to use some sort of software on my PC or Mac to categorize and identify my finished/saleable items (I’m not that concerned about tracking parts inventory) along with pictures of each, etc. If this could interface with Etsy (or other online sales platforms) that’s even better. Add a customer module that can print shipping labels and have a way to dump information to accounting software and everything is awesome! I have lots of questions so maybe feel free to private message me if you have experiences or details you doesn’t want to share publicly otherwise I’d love to hear from those of you that have tried this out. My goal in all of this is to set my wife up to manage the sales part of the business (easily and simply) and free me up to just make sawdust. If we can sell a bunch of stuff and pay for a few trips that would be great.
  5. I’ll post this question in the Marketplace, but I’m not selling anything... My wife want me to make several (many) different types of tea light candle holders from wood - in a bunch different styles, etc. In order to make life a lot easier and to best suit some of the design styles, I’m hoping to find an affordable source for metal tealight cup holders/grommets. These are not the metal cups the wax is poured into to make the actual tealights but rather a slightly larger cup/dish that a finished tealight can be placed into and easily removed/replaced as necessary. The pic is what I’m looking for... The only online source I’ve found is the UK version of Amazon (where I sourced this pic) - but that seller doesn’t ship to Canada. i see these things used in all types of pre-manufactured tealight fixtures so there must be a source for them. Maybe I just can find the proper Google search term to find them... Any suggestions, sources or other useful ideas are most welcome.
  6. I have a mid/large-sized overhead air cleaner (https://www.busybeetools.com/products/heavy-duty-air-filter-with-led-csa-cx408.html ) that I use regularly when I’m working in my shop (23x23 double car garage) - I actually most often turn it on when I leave the shop and let it run for a few hours. When I return to the shop the air is noticeably cleaner/fresher. However, I run my 3HP Oneida dust collector while I’m turning anything on my lathe -especially when I’m sanding. Most times I don’t even need to wear a respirator since I can get near 100% dust extraction. I used an inexpensive dust hood from Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/PSI-Woodworking-DLHOODC2-Magnetic-Mounting/dp/B000KIEC6U/ref=sr_1_3?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1508067050&sr=1-3&keywords=Lathe+dust) and rigged it up so it’s moveable - I can get it as close to the spot I’m working as is possible without being in my way. When it’s close, it does a surprisingly good job and I don’t get dust settling on everything in the shop.
  7. From Festool I have 1400 and 2200. For 99% of my use, the 1400 is my go-to. I actually only use the 2200 for flattening slabs using a 2.5” wide specialty flattening bit. If I was buying again, the 1400 would definitely be my 1st purchase. i also have a small DeWalt router that I use for small bit, etc.
  8. Lots of good advice here. At least once per year I find it useful to ‘condition’ the board. I simple homemade solution of mineral oil, beeswax (and maybe a little carnauba was if I’m feeling fancy) does a nice job of renewing the board (after a thorough cleaning and drying of course) In an old crock-pot I combine approx 8 parts mineral oil + 2 parts beeswax + 1/2 to 1 part carnauba wax (optional). Once it all melts together I let it cool and then apply the resulting soft (thick gel consistency) mixture onto the board. Wipe onto the wood surface thoroughly, let sit for a few hours and wipe away the excess with a paper towel. If the board was cleaned and left to completely dry before applying the mixture it will absorb some of the oil/wax mix and be almost as good as new. Put some the unused gel mix into small plastic containers and share (or sell) with your friends - give it some pretentious name and it will seem fancy! I should mention that I personally only use mineral oil, beeswax and carnauba wax that is labelled ‘food-safe’. I’ve heard some people add a few drops of lemon oil or other scent but I’ve never tried that. If you do add anything, be sure it’s actually ‘food-safe’ as many products that seem like they should be relatively harmless can actually be quite toxic if they were not Intended to be a food product.