toddclippinger

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About toddclippinger

  • Rank
    Journeyman Poster

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  • Website URL
    http://www.americancraftsmanworkshop.com/

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Billings, MT
  • Woodworking Interests
    There is no limit to what I will explore when it comes to designing and building with wood.

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  1. I looked at that picture and my first thought: Wow - looks like the work of H.O. Studley!
  2. You stopped by... I am impressed! I still need to check in with you guys to see if you can get what I need.
  3. Congrats! I will be looking forward to seeing the small shop come together!
  4. That is pretty cool! Love it!
  5. I remember conversing with Dyami Plotke from the Modern Woodworkers Association on the issue. He said Festool won't honor the warranty due to the static potentially burning out the electronics in their machine, even when using the one designed for the Festool vacs. It did not seem to be as much of a fire issue, just burning out the electronics, that was what I got out of the conversation anyway.
  6. Point well taken. Here in Montana, Home Depot actually carries some nice looking doug fir. In the past I have done just as you suggested Bombarde, purchase a wide board, rip out the pith and have vertical grain doug fir lumber. But this has been contained to shop and utilitarian projects. I have done work in California and I don't know what the heck is up with the bunks of lumber at Home Depot there, it is like they hose it down with water and throw the tarp over it. It literally is that wet and I have never seen it like that before. In Santa Cruz there was a big warehouse the size of Costco all full of redwood lumber and I could not believe how cheap it was! It was also clear to me that all the redwood cull lumber was being sent to Billings by the look of the quality in Santa Cruz compared to here at home. That is the back end of my work van getting ready to be loaded with redwood for the project I was on:) As an alternative I really do recommend checking out alder. You can get it fairly clear or knotty and it is not very expensive. It also comes commonly in 4/4 and 8/4. Over the years, I have found it to be easy to source both here in Billings and in central Ohio where I have worked. It has been popular in the modern-rustic look of many homes. The knots don't tend to fall out like knots in other lumber, they crack in a star shape but maintain their integrity. It is bit harder than poplar but not as hard as cherry. It is commonly used for mantles, trim, doors, and furniture such as dining tables and side tables here. It looks great finished clear, or with a dark brown or reddish-brown stain on it.
  7. I have mixed feelings on the framing lumber furniture movement. My first feeling is that I am repulsed by it. But I realize that I am further along on my woodworking journey, and it is very appealing to those that are just getting started out, and we all have to start somewhere. It is very attractive to the public at large because the material is so accessible, and this alone seems to demystify the process for so many. Compare the Lowe's or Home Depot shopping experience to how intimidating it felt to get started out going to the lumber supplier that caters to contractors and cabinet shops. I can remember being intimidated by what seemed to be this mysterious, esoteric knowledge that was required just to get started. The designs are attractive because they are uncomplicated and they feel down-to-earth, which goes along with the whole movement of making it by hand. This is not unlike the the attraction of Craftsman or Shaker style furniture. Many will get involved with the framing lumber projects and, over time, realize the issues inherent to using this material. Their interest will most likely take one of two routes: their interest will wane in building their own furniture, they will toss out their softwood framing lumber projects, and go buy something from the furniture store. Or, they will be hooked on the euphoria of building their own furniture and see what changes they can make to do it better. This is their journey, so they will grow and mature in their experience just like we have done. So one hand I am repulsed by it. On the other hand, I support those that get out in the shop, build something, and enjoy the creative life. Even if it is not with materials that I would choose.
  8. Try educating your client a little, see what conclusions she will arrive at. Take the wife to Lowe's or Home Depot and show her the fingernail test on a piece of framing lumber, then have her do it, and be sure to point out all of the twisted lumber. For the style she wants, alder might be a good option.
  9. The images on your original post are visible now - WOW! You did a fantastic job on that chair! Everything looks well executed and the color on that wood really popped! Excellent job!
  10. Thanks, for the feedback, I still see myself ordering a kit one of these days. I have several shop vacs for work and I have a variety of hoses so I can easily hook them up to a tool and leave it for the day. I think the Rockler kit still has a place in my shop.
  11. The biggest issue I have had with hoses that build up static charge is that they have shocked me hard enough to make my arm go numb clear up to my shoulder and make my chest tighten up. It was a bit frightening. Even when hooked to a Ridgid shop vac, the Festool hoses do not shock me at all. The Ridgid premium hoses seem to only gather a minor static charge that feels like getting pricked with a needle. The worst hoses have been the original ones that come with any shop vac. When ever I have purchased a new vac, I also just go ahead and get a premium hose for it and toss or give the original hose away. There is usually someone that will take it for free. It seemed like I remember the kit being pretty reasonably priced as well. Do you have any issue with static build-up?
  12. The universal kit from Rockler was another thing I had thought of getting just to try out. The Festool hose fits a lot of various tools but not everything. I was thinking the Rockler kit might fit the few things that the Festool hose does not.
  13. I have been wanting to try the Bosch hose. I have not seen the anti-static one, only the grey one. I know that one is a lot less expensive than the Festool. I will have to look for the Bosch anti-static version. Currently, I have 3 Festool hoses and 5 Ridgid premium hoses. They have been pretty good.