Hurricane Dry

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About Hurricane Dry

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    Built, bold, useful.

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  1. Thanks. I was having trouble deciding between a Rolls and a Ferrari. I really didn't want the Rolls and now that you pointed out a Ferrari is actually more practical, well that just sealed the deal.
  2. I have made 6 different shop cabinets of two different types using plastic sliding door track from KV (knape & Vogt). I used the P2417 assemblies for 1/4" doors made from melamine covered mdf. https://www.knapeandvogt.com/sites/default/files/Hardware-Guide-Sliding-Door-Hardware-Section.pdf Sliding doors are good in situations where opening the door is in your way. Also, you can leave the door open and it stays out of your way so you can use the cabinet as an open shelf which is handy when the cabinets are above a work table. Because the doors aren't supported on hinges, yo
  3. I like watching Diresta's cat work at the bandsaw. Spike is pretty good with his paws and you can see them real good on account of their being white and perfectly clean.
  4. 100% This. Then a #4 smoother, then a #5 low angle jack for shooting end grain, then a #7 Jointer.
  5. Thanks. I did the shim. It worked. i kept moving the shim around to better hit the high. I had tried taking the end highs down on the other side, but that didn't help as still get too much movement with my sorry power tool style clamping set-up. I will build a proper bench, but I have been making melamine or plywood shop cabinets, so I don't have a major need as of yet.
  6. For the record, I like Mary Anne better than Ginger. Nothing wrong with Ginger, but Mary Anne was more better.
  7. So I had this old couch that wasn't worth reupholstering. It's a little over 20 years old and I saved the bits of wood the frame was made out of. The manufacturer appeared to have used lots of cut-offs from other furniture making processes, so I have some a mixture of red oak, white oak, and I believe walnut sap wood. I have been practicing hand planing on these pieces. I have LN #4 smoother (bevel down), LN #5 Low Angle bevel up Jack, and LN low angle bevel up rabbet block. I have gotten to the point where I can sharpen all three blades very well and all three planes can cut very
  8. He's definitely a Woodworker. Experience shows and there is a clear dividing line in skill vs product sales in his videos. The video on top 5 hand plane issues is a good video if you aren't interested in product sales. His advice is well reasoned, practical, to the point, explained well and demonstrated for effectiveness. He's more about the results and less about his own personality or providing entertainment. Think about a really good shop teacher you had back in the 70's. And this thread has turned into a great gathering of well known internet woodworking craftsman that I go
  9. Everything was fine. And then the cat saw an opportunity to test it's recently sharpened claws.
  10. Good wheels. Not dinky 3 inch casters which find any wood chip, dropped screw, or expansion joint. You can roll over all shop floor annoyances unimpeded.
  11. Plus General Finishes Milk paint comes in limited colors. Benjamin Moore Advance is great. I like the way it brushes. I used it in satin. Nice sheen. I think it looks much better than the stuff I painted with the milk paint. But a couple of hints are that it dries to the touch it a normal time, but it takes a long time to cure to final hardness. It will continue to harden for something like 30 days according to the TDS. It is best not to rush it when putting the next coat on. The TDS says minimum recoat time is 16 hours at a specific temperature and RH, but brushing with a thicker
  12. Please do not tell her to do that to Walnut. Right now Nicolas Cage is screaming, Nooooooooooooo, not the Walnut. It will be a waste of pine, but let it be pine. I would tell her what I think. What I think, that the video makes it look easy and quick, but all those pocket screws are actually tedious to drill and that the wood will dry and shrink across the width and the table will move. I would tell her that even tables made from quality wood expect the top to move and are fastened using special methods to allow movement. I would tell her that the guy who made the video doesn't know
  13. The temperature of Odon, Indiana was a high of 67 to a low of 50 on January 21, today it has been between 23 and 32. Assuming the temperature in your shop when you measured the humidity was approimately the same on both days, then having to heat the air from 67 to 72 is only 5 degrees versus, heating the air from 32 to 72 which is 40 degrees while the difference from 23 to 72 is 49 degrees. When you heat air, you drop the relative humidity because the air expands so the amount of moisture relative to the amount of air drops.
  14. Yes. I would suggest the really big one and the almost really big one. Especially if you build cabinets. I went metric. One day in the future, I will probably get the 8 inch one in metric. I bought the 26 and 18 without the case. The shipping packaging is done very well so you don't have to have the case for shipping. As for protection, I made a small block about 2 or 3 inches square for each of them that hangs them on the wall. The block nestles in the inside corner and has a lip to hold the square. The two legs hang down at about a 45 degree angle or whatever angle
  15. Whenever you heat air, you will drop the relative humidity. The colder the outside air is, the more you have to heat it to the same comfortable room temperature. The greater the outside air temperature to room temperature ratio, the greater the relative humidity drop.