jussi

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Everything posted by jussi

  1. I highly suggest getting a splitter asap. Kick back is one (if not the most) likely cause of tablesaw injuries. I second the recommendation of the microjig splitters. I had it on my previous ts and it worked great. That type of splitter also makes switching out to a dado stack a little easier and faster as well as opposed to having a traditional splitter. I would also make a zero clearance insert. Good luck. Stay safe.
  2. Nice shop. You utilize the space well and have air of great tools
  3. Nice!! Looks very well made
  4. Great router with a major flaw. The speed control has a good chance of failing and goes straight to max speed. I have had 4 of those routers and 2 of them have had the speed control break. It can be fixed fairly cheap. The magnetic ring breaks and needs to be replaced and probably the bearing as well. But getting the bearing in and out is a bear. If you do a quick google search on it, you’ll see I’m not the first to have the problem. Disappointing as it really is a great router otherwise. Even more so since dewalt clearly knows about the problem and hasn’t fixed it yet. Or maybe they have on
  5. Thanks for the suggestions guys. As I said I would love nordfab but I just can't justify the cost. I still regret not jumping a deal on craigslist last year. I like the idea of using a local place. I will do some research and see what I can find. On that note, if anyone in the Los Angeles or OC area knows of such a place please post here or PM me. Thanks
  6. I'm hoping to finally install my cyclone early next year and was wondering what kind of ducting you guys use. I currently have 4" SD for my Delta dc but want to step it up to a 6" metal ducting when I put in the cyclone. It's a 3hp Oneida. Nordfab would be the ideal choice but too expensive for me. What other options do you suggest looking into? Thanks
  7. Aside from brand I would also investigate the specific model itself along with the year of manufacture. When I my first big boy saw saw 8+ years ago it was a craftsman hybrid saw. Even by that time the brand's reputation was not very good, to say the least. And alot (most) of your tablesaws were poop. But they did have a higher end line (I believe) were designed by Emerson. The zip code saws as they were called, because the model numbers were that of city zip codes, were very well made and were one of the best saws for that price range. I absolutely loved my 22124 and did everything I wa
  8. Under $200 I think the Ridgid is the best deal. I had that before upgrading to a floor model and liked it alot. Triton also makes one and seems to get good reviews. https://www.amazon.com/Triton-TSPS450-Oscillating-Spindle-Sander/dp/B00ATZKUYW
  9. IMO Flattening with a ROS doesn't sound like a good idea. Especially with 80 grit. Too likely to do the opposite of flattening. A drum sander would be ideal but I agree card scraper and hand planes work great.
  10. I made my own dominos in the beginning but quickly found I didn't have the patience and gladly paid for the convenience and time saved. 75% of my Festool tools are from craigslist so they're out there. But their rise in popularity over the last few years means deals aren't as abundant as they once were. They're currently selling recons right now. They only sell one tool at a time and it's first come first serve though. They had a couple df 500 discounted 25% off but they only come with 1 year warranty. Festool vacs are great but if you're not ready to make the investment yet just get a 2
  11. No affiliation besides being a frequent buyer and an occasional seller. Anderson just provides the space. I'm not aware of any sale they have. In fact I don't even think they're open on weekends normally. I think you can buy small stuff but I doubt you can buy things like plywood because the entrance blocked. John, the owner does sell some of his own tools occasionally but that's the extent of their involvement in terms of selling that I know of. They hold the shows 3-4 places in socal and the businesses just allow them to set up in their parking lot. Laura, listed on the post, is one o
  12. https://losangeles.craigslist.org/wst/tls/6128960971.html May 20th. is the next Anderson Plywood Old Tool Swap Meet from 6:00 AM until Noon. The address is 4020 Sepulveda Blvd., Culver City, CA 90230. We start setting up at 4:30AM. If you are new, wait until Laura or John get there because some areas are restricted. Please do not bring trailers. Most of the spaces can handle normal size pick up trucks or vans. There are several new spots that require unloading your tools and then parking your vehicle in the Elks parking lot. If you only have a few tools, you can put them
  13. There is this. No experience though. And it seems like he's not making any at this time. http://theborkstore.com/
  14. jussi

    Pickup Trucks

    I'm in the market for a truck as well and on the fence between the F150 and Tacoma. I was initially leaning towards the tacoma because it's history of reliability but a couple of the Ford dealerships are throwing out some very tempting rebates. An XL I have my eye one has over $10k in discounts. Which cab option did you get? How well does it drive? What made you go with the F150 in the end?
  15. I'm a total fanboy and have all of the routers. My favorites are the 2200 and mfk 700. The 2200 has the best ergonomics and dust collection of any router I've used. That said it's a beast and there many situations it's too akward to use (sometimes even with supports). I like the 1400 as well and while I think it's as good or better than most of the other routers i don't think It's far superior. I have a dewalt 621 and 625 as well and really like the both routers, especially the 621. Good dust collection ( almost as good as the 1400 if the cut is on the surface of the board). Big advantag
  16. I'd go with the newer ETS EC models. IMO the ergonomics are much better. The 3 stroke should be fine. I also like the RO90 for sanding face frames because of it's small size it's less likely to tip over and round the edges.
  17. I have both Mirka Deros and Ceros and had the older style Festool ETS 150. All 3 gave good results but the ergonomics on the Mirka were much better. The ETS with it's taller profiler just didn't feel as comfortable for me and I eventually sold it. I've tried the newer EC models and they feel much better from quickly trying them out during demos but can't really comment much as I don't own one or have any extended use on them. I also like the paddle switch but not everyone does. Some people absolutely hate it. So if you're thinking about getting one, I would seriously try it out first.
  18. I have most of the tools they sell in the US. If I had to do it all over again, a few tools I would buy again without question, some I would be on the fence on, and some I would just get another brand. The last not because it was a poor product, but a less expensive option would work well enough for me. Others are correct in that you're buying into a system. One of my favorite and most used tools is the MFT and the only saw that will work with it is a Festool brand. Same for the routers and using the edge guide (although I much prefer a home made jig)
  19. https://losangeles.craigslist.org/wst/tls/5871332429.html Saturday, November 19th. is the next Anderson Plywood Old Tool Swap Meet from 6:00 AM until Noon. The address is 4020 Sepulveda Blvd., Culver City, CA 90230. We start setting up at 4:30 AM. If you are new, wait until Laura or John get there because some areas are restricted. Please do not bring trailers. Most of the spaces can handle normal size pick up trucks or vans. There are several new spots that require unloading your tools and then parking your vehicle in the Elks parking lot. If you only have a few tools, you can put the
  20. Looks good. I like the use of the heat shrink.
  21. jussi

    Pantorouter

    Is this the same design as Mathias Wendel (sp?)
  22. You're asking about the MFK700 I assume? If so it's is much lighter than a 2-1/4 router. Closer to a palm router weight. With the horizontal base (which is all I've used so far) you just hold it and the handle with a small downward pressure but you're by no means bearing down on it. Since it was designed to be used horizontally it feels very natural in your hands. This is another benefit I forgot to mention. With a normal router and flush trim bit, unless you made some kind of jig for it you have to use it vertically. This can be a cumbersome if you the piece is large. That said I've
  23. It would. I think the big advantage with something like an MFK700 is the setup time and precision. With a flush trim bit you have to clamp on a supporting piece or be really careful to avoid tipping. Even then it's still not too hard to gouge the surface. The mfk allows you to quickly dial the depth so it's ever so proudly above the panel and the sanding afterwards will get the edge banding dead flush. It also comes with a 1.5 degree horizontal base that further helps you prevent from gouging. All that said it's by no means a necessity. And one advantage the flush trim bit has is t
  24. It's my favorite router for edge banding for sure. I had the attachments for the 1400 and it works but the router is pretty heavy and so you have to be careful to always put alot of pressure on the handle. The mfk is alot more balanced and alot faster to setup. You can also dial in the bit depth alot faster. That said it is a much specialized tool so it depends if you think you do enough work for it to justify the cost. Or in my case just wanted a new toy Oh one negative about the mfk you are limited on the thickness of your edge banding. This isn't a problem if you use comme