MartinN

Members
  • Posts

    15
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Woodworking Interests
    Furniture

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

MartinN's Achievements

Apprentice Poster

Apprentice Poster (1/3)

0

Reputation

  1. For anyone using this as a reference down the road, I found this Youtube video from Matt at Woodwhisper which illustrates what everyone here has been saying.
  2. Hi Everyone, I think (fingers crossed) I figured out what was wrong and just wanted to post the solution for any other newbies who run into this later. I checked for co-planer tables as best I could with the cheap levels you can get at home improvement stores (was going to go to woodcraft this weekend for a better one) but as I was going through and checking everything again I noticed the stock wasn't sitting well against the fence when I was feeding the board through. (This is the first tool I have that's fence guided like this, so I initially wasn't sure what to expect). I'm not sure if I failed to lock the fence properly or what happened but long story short my fence was off of 90 degrees by between 1/8 and 1/4 of an inch. After re-aligning the fence I ran through a couple of boards and the jointer is making contact with the entire board and the rocking is gone. As I suspected it was a newbie mistake :-/
  3. Alright. It seemed in my mind that one side getting thinner and one side not meant that it was not making a straight surface but upon rereading Janelle's post I think I get it. Looks like it is time to order a long straight edge. Just to clarify - I was using the 2 x 4 as a practice piece because I managed to massacre some other wise good cherry earlier today. I have been having the same issue with facing, so I haven't been able to get a flat face to register against the fence. I'll put a straight edge on order and see if there is a significant sag on my infeed table, since it seems like that could cause this.
  4. Sorry for breaking this into two videos... I don't use the video recording feature on my phone much.... The board does not lay flat on the jointer's infeed table. When I run the board through the jointer you can feel the knives making contact with the wood for the first 4 or 5 inches but then once I shift to putting pressure on the out feed table the knives stop making contact with the wood. (Gah.. I hate looking at myself on video!)
  5. Sorry, it was a little hard to explain. I've attached a photo of what I mean by the board getting thinner on only one side. After 5 or 6 passes trying to face the board - the edge on the left hand side is about 1/8 thicker then the edge on the right. After the Packers finish this horrible display against the Raiders I'll see if I can find a way to take a video that doesn't exceed the sites upload limits.
  6. Thanks for the feedback. The knife is flush to the bottom of the straight edge (not not lifting it up)
  7. Hi everyone, I just got my first (new to me) jointer. I'm having a hard time getting boards flat with it (both faces and edges). I got the jointer from an auction at a cabinet maker that was closing down, so I'm assuming the tables are co planer. (I don't have a 48 inch level to check but will get one if needed). I've watched the wood whisperer videos on setting up and using jointers and I'm not sure if this is a user issue or calibration issue. If I cut half way through a board while edge jointing I've noticed that there is significant play and the board will lift up off the indeed table when you put pressure on the out feed table. I think that's why the boards are ending up too thin on the front half and too thick on the back half. Any thoughts on what could be wrong?
  8. Excellent. Thank you again for all the help everyone and thank you for the pictures Eric. That helps a lot in being able to visualize when I have sufficient film on a piece.
  9. Thank you everyone for the feedback. I just tried reapplying in a much thinner coat. Just to be clear, are you guys still only doing 3 coats (as per the can) with thin coats? I read one thread where someone was putting 7 coats on. If you are doing that, does that mean you are spending 14 days applying ARS? (7 coats on each side, alternating which side is on the bottom while drying) and then another week for it to cure? Second question, does anyone have a readily available photo showing a correct ARS application from close up? I always imagine poly as looking like wood behind a layer of plastic/glass. I suspect this may be a result of me using far too much... This stuff isn't easy to learn when you are trying to figure it out on your own!
  10. Thank you everyone for the feedback. I just tried reapplying in a much thinner coat. Just to be clear, are you guys still only doing 3 coats (as per the can) with thin coats? I read one thread where someone was putting 7 coats on. If you are doing that, does that mean you are spending 14 days applying ARS? (7 coats on each side, alternating which side is on the bottom while drying) and then another week for it to cure?
  11. Ah yikes. I was assuming it went on pretty thick based on the can't directions to use a foam brush and only 3 coats to finish it.
  12. Hi Everyone New to wood working and thus this is my first time using Arm R Seal. I have had a hard time getting it to go on evenly (I had a much easier time with Watco brush on lacquer which I used on the last project). Part of this issue might be the Wisconsin weather, so after feed back to my previous thread I'm going go to this it a little (10 %) and bring it inside to dry after applying it in the garage. I've attached a photo of the defects I'm getting are these brush strokes or something else?
  13. Wow that looks amazing. I love the dark and light contrast. Your work bench looks a lot better then most of the furniture I've made so far....
  14. I shudder to think of what my fiancee would do to me if I tried to finish my projects in our finished basement... With trying to rub the dust out, will I have to do that between every coat? (I'm worried about sanding through). I would think that each additional layer of arm r seal will bury the dust deeper.
  15. Hi Everyone I'm hoping for some advice from some fellow northerners on the most user friendly finish methods for cold climates. I live in Wisconsin so it's usually 50 or below for half the year. My shop is in my garage and has a large heater, but I'm worried about blowing dust if I leave it on during finishing. I've been using arm r seal on my current project (after warming the garage to about 60 degrees) but it takes a long time to finish drying in this weather. I don't mind waiting it out but the long dry time allows it to pick up a lot of floating dust. It seems like lacquer is the best bet for curing time, but you can't spray it in the cold weather and if I close up the garage I have an issue with ventilation and the gas powered heater. With that in mind brush on lacquer seems like the best option but that gets a lot of hate online. Can anyone weigh in with how you handle cold weather finishing? (sorry for any punctuation issues, this is typed on my phone at work because I can't stop thinking about this and just finished listening to the wood whisperer podcast on finishing). Thanks all, Martin