bleedinblue

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Everything posted by bleedinblue

  1. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    I may have an opportunity for some reasonably priced 4"x6" white oak beams. How difficult would it be to modify the plans to give it a go? I'm assuming the 4" would have to come down to 3-3.5" for flatness, so I'd probably have to bring that 6" down to close to 4". It could be a lot of waste, or I may be able to rip off an inch and salvage some 4/4+ boards. I'm mostly concerned with the dog hole strip, the outer top laminate that the end cap ties into, and vise installation, since I'll stick with BC. Random thoughts?
  2. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    I'm really disappointed in the photos, I may (but probably won't) dig out the DSLR and try to snap a few quality pictures. These are just so washed out they didn't capture the figure in the wood or depth of the color variations. Something odd...the dead man and end cap are both cherry, and mostly heart wood, but the color just isn't there. Hopefully they start to catch up with the leg vise chop.
  3. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    Alright, got a bit impatient. Photo dump time. I couldn't capture the ray fleck on the tops in the pictures, so that sucks. It's not perfect and never was going to be...but I'm happy, happier than I expected to be. I think I made it the best I could have given my skill, time to dedicate, and material.
  4. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    Yup, I know. I'm using up some leftover waterlox. I will certainly have to be careful not to build up too much of a finish.
  5. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    So I had to go back to work and that really derailed my shop time. But...ya know what today is? Finishing day. The bench is complete, save for the lower shelf and some trimming i will need to do to the dogs to account for the rubber/cork. I ain't gonna lie, the bench is starting to look cool. The finish is making it pop. Pictures later today or tomorrow.
  6. bleedinblue

    My crappy little shop

    My happy place is a humble one, but it's come a long way in a couple years. I don't expect anyone here to get any ideas, inspiration or happy feelings from what I've got or what I've done, but I think it is probably a good idea to track progress and open yourself up for suggestions. Since I am nearing the completion of a project, it was a good time to clean up and snap some pictures. This is my footprint. Not shown in the diagram is where the "shop" ends and where the walkout is. I've got a couple hundred board feet of cherry and maple stacked in the corner by the door, and I do most of my finishing in front of the walkout. It's nice to have the extra space and at least one source of fresh air. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. To the left of the table saw, from this view, the room opens up and there lies one of my biggest deficiencies and the beginning of my workflow. It's really an OK bandsaw...but I say that having not ever used a GOOD bandsaw. It's on my short list to get upgraded. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. Also on the short list, is this baby jointer. It makes (small) boards flat and square...other than that? Ehhh... This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. Next up in the workflow is the Dewalt planer. I have no real reason to upgrade it until/unless I get a floor standing 15" planer, and I really don't know where I'd find the room for it. I'm not real happy with having to roll it out for use, but when I got the drum sander the planer landed here by necessity. The stand was re-purposed from something else and I'll build a new one soon. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. Not necessarily in line with the workflow, but here's my mini-miter station. Built this summer but still needs trim, maybe doors, etc. It's just three feet to one side and two feet to the other, and I like it that way. It fits the space well. The cabinet houses my track saw, Domino, and finishing supplies. It also houses a bunch of scraps that I milled from rough, I thought were maple and turned out to be ash. Whoops. The miter saw it's self is just a Hitatchi 10" non-slider, and I don't care. I'll run it til it dies, then buy another non-slider. The shop vac underneath lives there just to clean up the inevitable miter saw mess. Obviously there is some lumber storage above the station. I purposely built the cabinet on the short side for that reason. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. My table saw. It does what is needed, I have no complaints, other than it is not a Sawstop. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. My tablesaw outfeed table blows. It's going away soon for something more stout and with more storage. The only thing I like about this is the shop vac rests under it nicely. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. The Rockler router table. I just got it this year, it's OK. I think I'm going to remove the steel stand and build my own, but I'll wait until I get a lift. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. The new hotness is the new Supermax 16-32. I've barely used it, as the first project I did after buying it was all plywood (kid's table and chairs) I'm pretty happy with the cabinet though, and it's opened up a bunch of storage. I just need to figure out what best lives in it. This image has been reduced by 70.2%. Click to view full size. The benchtop drill press and mini air compressor. The drill press is the only remnants of harbor freight in the shop. I don't really like it, but I don't really care either. It's very low on my priority list. Higher on my priority list is completing the cabinet it sits on, that whole upper section will be drawers for drill bits and other crap. This image has been reduced by 70.2%. Click to view full size. To one side of the bench is this little....little tool "wall." I've gone to all Liam Neason planes, save for the one POS Stanley block that isn't worth anything to sell. This is a work in progress obviously, I'm going to keep my hand tools to a minimum, but I need a shoulder plane, a couple spoke shaves, etc. The router plane is the LV, I don't use it much and need to figure out why the blade won't secure completely. It "wiggles," even with all adjustments tightened. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. The other side of the bench has this slightly larger, little tool "wall." These were both built from scrap walnut ply, so that's what dictated their size. Whatev. Room to grow here also, obviously. This image has been reduced by 70.2%. Click to view full size. Ridgid sander and tool box o'crap....no real need to upgrade from that sander for now. It needs to be lower, I made that cabinet to be too tall. This image has been reduced by 70.2%. Click to view full size. This is my second workbench but it's not up to snuff, the typical laminated sheets of plywood most of us start out on. It's not my top priority, even as far as shop furniture goes, but sooner than later this will need to be upgraded. But for now, it's heavy, solid and it takes a beating. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. I'm solidly in the "don't need a ton of clamps" camp. I'd take some more but room is going to be a factor. Scrap wood on the floor underneath, and there is a rack of 10-12 long pipe clamps on the other end of the basement for when I need long clamps. Oh yeah, the Irwins are absolute garbage. I'd trade my four for two besseys any day of the week. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size. My band-aid solution for dust collection. For now just the flex hose that I take from machine to machine. I'm going to run at least a short bit of PVC to stretch from here to the drum sander and have drops for the planer, jointer, table saw and drum sander. When/If I get convinced we will stay in this house forever, I need to get serious about dust collection. This image has been reduced by 70.2%. Click to view full size. And perhaps my biggest complaint of this shop? The dumb walls. My wife simply rolls her eyes and gives me permission to buy a table saw or drum sander, but I get a flat out NO when I say I want to paint the walls. They're all concrete, too, so they're not functional AND they provide zero manly/woodworking ambiance. This image has been reduced by 60.3%. Click to view full size.
  7. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    The chop is cherry and maple. The 6/4 cherry I was going to double up to use for the chop ended up being a little too thin after milling, so I laminated some scrap maple in between the two halves of cherry. Kind of an after thought and the only place maple has been used on the bench, but whatev. The deadman will likely be cherry as I have a lot of it on hand, and the end cap and dogs are cherry. I have some live edge cherry that could turn out pretty cool. As I type this though...I realize I do have quite a bit of curly maple and that may tie into the maple in the chop...
  8. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    Thanks to government inefficiency, I was off all weekend. The major lifting is done. It needs a lot of cleanup, flattening, etc, but at least it now looks like a bench. I ended up at about 82" long and 24 1/2 inches wide. The gap stop is about 2 1/4". Back to work tomorrow, but after flattening, I'll be on to shaping the chop, making the shelf, making the gap stop and figuring out what I'm going to use for the deadman. All relatively quick, tasks.
  9. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    That's essentially when I ended up doing. I threw their directions away and went at it. I ended up making the deep channels about a quarter inch deeper than the plans called for, then had to mortise the bottom steel reinforcement plates even deeper, but I finally got the silky smooth action intended. Soooooo the leg vise is done, each slab is cut to final length, and the base is assembled. So close to getting the slabs mounted onto the base and I had to stop because I cant lift the base onto the slabs by myself. After making it this far alone, I'm going to need a hand lifting something
  10. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    I spent all afternoon installing the leg vise. What a colossal pain. I read somewhere on here someone praising the "detailed and clear" instructions. I guess my brain doesn't work that way. Reading those directions feels like reading the technical directions for a stereo system. The channels are routed out, the holes are drilled and I'll be trying to get it in working order tomorrow morning. A fifteen minute test for the criss cross arms didn't go so well...the holes for the steel rods are apparently too low/deep as the rods didn't line up with the criss cross. I suppose that means deepening the channels some, or maybe just removing some material at the top of the channels.
  11. bleedinblue

    Outdoor Rocker

    Skipping to the end to just say...you're a machine Drew. Not counting the few pros here, you must have the most production of anyone on the forum.
  12. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    The gnarly knot in the front right has what seemed like a liter of epoxy in it. It was going to get hidden, but I changed my mind and threw it on the front. I kind of wish it was further up on the leg to be more visible. On to the leg vise. Getting real close now.
  13. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    Back to work either tomorrow or Saturday, I didn't get it done. Close though. The leg mortises are all cut and the holes drilled in the right front leg. The chop is glued up. Tonight I got the side rails milled and cut to length but needs tenons cut. After the rail tenons are done itll be on to the leg vise install
  14. bleedinblue

    Track saw kickback

    The second cut with my new Makita. The first cut was great, the second kicked back and damaged the first inch or so of track. Worse than the damage to the track, in my opinion, is the large cut in the table top. What went wrong? In a nut shell, I am squaring up the tabletop. The track is only 48" and the top is 60". I was cutting toward my referencing corner, so I began the cut plunging. I was going to back the track up after that cut and get the first foot of the table. I'm not too sure why I did it this way, but I can't see how it wouldn't work. The plunge began fine, then about six inches into the cut the kickback happened, sending the saw backward, into the track and the tabletop. I only had one hand on the saw and was off to the side enough I don't feel I was in any real danger. Next question, where do I go from here? Make the already small table (35x60) narrower to cut out the damage? Curve the corner? Inlay a patch? (though it is through the outer edge of a breadboard...) If this was my fault and the saw isn't to blame, I don't care too much about the damaged track. I'll cut off two inches and not miss it too much.
  15. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    Fair point and good idea.
  16. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    Time to make some dogs, trim the slabs to length then move on to the base. Looks like a 2" gap stop will put me right at 24" wide. I can live with that. It sounds like I will be off work for another week or longer. Maybe I can get this thing done before I go back. Probably not, but MAYBE.
  17. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    There was...an incident. All are physically, mentally and professionally ok though.
  18. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    Got some unexpected time off work starting today and spent a half hour getting the dog hole strip glued onto the slab. This is what it's looking like so far. Not a premo-creamy-white-maple bench, but it is starting to resemble a roubo. Also measured the widths of the slabs and I think I can beat 24". May aim for 24 1/2". With this time off I should be able to finish up the top and get started on the base within the week.
  19. bleedinblue

    Help needed!

    That shouldn't be difficult for that box and that price range. I was picturing dovetails and exotics...THAT would be difficult to produce twenty a month.
  20. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    I'm gonna epoxy it, 100%. The front slab doesn't have any knots or voids, but the rear, I believe, does have a couple. Its plenty solid enough, and the defects are more cosmetic than anything. I'm also well aware that the work bench top shouldn't be glass smooth, but I do want it to be mostly smooth. I'm going to do the epoxy work before final flattening, and I'm going to use the router method. The router bit isnt going to care much about a little bit of epoxy. I cut the dog strip to final length, clamped it up and marked for dominos this morning. The front slab looks pretty decent and should look just fine in the end.
  21. We've lamented the mediocre quality of our dining set for a while now. It's the typical mid-range stuff from one of the large furniture stores. During Christmas, my FIL was getting up from one of the chairs and there must have been a void under the veneer because his finger went right through it. Odd, and it displays the quality of the chairs. We don't dislike the design of the chairs, but naturally I'd prefer solid wood. This gave me the idea of disassembling one of the existing chairs and using the parts as templates and for exact dimensions. I would use better joinery, likely relying heavily on the Domino, and perhaps do some power carving on the seats. Before having this idea I wasn't exactly excited about building dining chairs...it seems like a slog of a project, but taking the guesswork out of the design and even having pre-made templates for routing should make it better. Has anyone done such a thing?
  22. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    My current bench is going to be moved over and modified into an outfeed table for my TS. That bench is 3'x5'. I may or may not have to trim it down a bit, but I will have that option for assembly of larger pieces. That being said, 24" does still feel like a good target width for the roubo. After the front laminate is in place I'm going to have to see how far out I am. It may mean adding on to the rear slab, or it may mean a wider than average gap stop. I should know enough to make a decision on that very soon.
  23. bleedinblue

    A Roubo from beams?

    Yup, I'm definitely not stopping. These parts are too move out of the way easily, the only way to get them out of the way is to get it done!
  24. Na, I don't have the guild dining chair project. I suppose if I dive into this it'll be a good idea to get it, even if I don't follow his design. I'm really not enthused about designing furniture myself...that's not the fun part to me. I'm less enthused about designing chairs. To add to that...short of Maloof (or Maloof inspired) chairs, nothing I've really seen has blown me away. I'm pretty well convinced that a simple design, made of quality materials and proper joinery, will be the ticket.
  25. My best guess is they veneered over ply or some other substrate, and the substrate had a flaw with a hollow area. I'm sure it wasn't intentional, just a result of sub-par materials. That's just a guess though. The prospect of building dining chairs has always turned me off, but I'm getting on board more and more. I think this could work. It's going to mean setting up a system for production type work, I'm betting the boss is going to order eight chairs.