Chestnut

Members
  • Content Count

    4,640
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    27

Everything posted by Chestnut

  1. Chestnut

    PJ882-HH Funny Noise

    I pulled up the manual and got the size it's 5/16" x 3/8" so it looks like it's from somewhere inside. I checked every set screw location and they all have one so not sure where it came from. My nose is running like a fire hydrant so i'm not really keen on digging further to find it. It could be from something else as well this isn't the only tool in my shop with set screws. I've also used this size for other things in the shop so yeah....
  2. Chestnut

    PJ882-HH Funny Noise

    So my jointer has been making an odd noise for a while now. Not even sure when it started but it's been at least 3 months. Today it seemed like it got worse. It functions wonderfully other than the noise it's making. If any one has any ideas let me know. My trouble shooting thus far was to remove the belt and spin the cutter head. There was no cogging or resistance that would indicate a bad bearing. The cutter head spins butter smooth and doesn't make a peep with the belt off though i can't spin it up much to check. Nothing is in the belt or making contact with the belt. The pulley on both the motor and cutter head are no loose to a hand inspection. The belt doesn't have any signs of increased wear or really any signs of wear at all.
  3. Chestnut

    PJ882-HH Funny Noise

    Figured out the noise. I knew it was a bad sign with it stopped. The set pin backed out on the top pulley and the key fell out of the keyway. Got that fixed trouble is now there is a set screw that i found on the floor and i don't know where it came from. both pulley's have both of their set screws.
  4. Chestnut

    Countertop Repair

    I think you right and i believe Ross posted something about using strong alkaline chemicals to "stain" the tanins in oak. I believe he used powdered lye drain cleaner. Isn't grout basically a portland cement?
  5. Chestnut

    Countertop Repair

    I agree give it time to dry but i doubt that's the whole story. My second thought would be to rent a hardwood flooring edger. I'd try the ROS to start but if it's slow going and you start to put some waves in the surface I'd go for a more aggressive approach. The hardwood flooring edgers work FAST and their rental isn't all that expensive might save you the cost in time and frustration.
  6. Chestnut

    Sepele Jewelry Boxes

    Love the sideboard looks awesome in every picture! oh wait this was about jewelry boxes good work on those too. All jokes aside i love the simple design and that Sepele must look spectacular when it catches sunlight.
  7. Chestnut

    Smoothing plane

    I forgot to mention the finenes of the cut thank you for covering it far better than i could have. I'm assuming in the Quoted section you meant to say "but i very much don't think it comes close to PMV-11."? The only question in my mind is how many years of experience will i need before i even notice the small differences? I've never noticed the sticky feel nor the harder to remove wire edge. I do notice that the Ln blade stays sharp a bit longer than the PMV-11. I don't really notice a ton of difference in cut quality not sure if that's the metal or a new modern plane vs an 80 year old one. They both slice end grain well despite higher angle planes not being ideal for end grain cutting.
  8. Chestnut

    Smoothing plane

    I think you can put a pmv-11 blade in the LN planes and veritas has their own A-2 steel blades. So you really can go either way with both companies. If your comparing the A-2 of LN and the PMV-11 of Veritas they are goth going to sharpen to a very high quality edge. They are both high quality steels but the difference between them is a trade-off. I think the stock blade that came with my LN #4 has a slight edge over the PMV-11 for durability and longevity. It doesn't sharpen as fast though. This is another one of those things that there are going to be 3 opinions the A-2 Crew the O-1 Crew and the PMV-11 crew, kinda have to just decide. If i buy anything Veritas i get PMV-11 because i think it is good. But i'm not going to buy solely Veritas just for that blade it's not THAT good.
  9. Chestnut

    Christmas Dining Table

    I started out with milling the leg pieces. I have a top that is 2.5" tall and 8/4 milled to around 1.75" The bottom is 3" and 8/4. I really wanted the top arm to be a bit more delicate looking but after reviewing the design i decided it needed more meat to ensure that the tip doesn't break off. That will make sense later. Cut the through tenon with a router and a bearing guided bit. All that leaves is to square the corners Next i worked on laying out the curves that will be on the arms of the leg assembly. The main curve on the center piece is asymmetrical so i figured all of the curves should follow that style. I pulled out the fence curve things and finally decided on some lines that i liked. After i had one curve for the bottom and top (not pictured, I'll have to take a picture and add later) i used that curve to draw a line to cut to on the other leg assembly. after cutting and shaping the 2nd assembly i transferred the lines back to the other side of the first piece. When working with the french and asymmetrical curves it's hard to draw 2 identical compound curves so this was my method that wasn't making a template. All parts got a 1/4" round over. Through tenon was next. I used the dado stack to get close and then my favorite LN 140 to finesse the fit. I ran into an interesting problem though. What do you do when the tenon cheek is wider than your block plane? The answer was to use 2 block planes. The 140 has a nicker so if i were to clean the entire tenon with it i'd leave gouges everywhere. You can retract the nicker but that's a lot of wrk when you have to clean the 2 sides evenly. Ended up getting an awesome fit. Next up is to work on the extension pieces. It's an idea i got from @Chet on his dining table build. I am using the upper tresle arms to hold the extensions with a 3/4" deep groove. The top will float about the arms by around 1.25". So far all i've done is taken some redwood as test pieces to make sure my idea works. I want to have the slides as far towards the center as possible and leave more solid wood on the end so that there isn't as much drawer slide to see when the extension is out and it might possibly give the leaves more to rest on. All in all i think this idea will work out. I had to get over the idea that the drawer slides needed to be on the ends of the supports. Their location doesn't matter because the leaves and top are mounted to the wood pieces no the drawer slide. With the wood being the key it doesn't matter where the slide is located. Oh the reason for the title is i'm trying to have this complete for Christmas. I'm hosting my immediate family and don't have a table for our dining room currently. I should be able to complete the table with plenty of time to spare.
  10. Chestnut

    # 11 Biscuit

    Nailing the thickness in sheet form with a drum sander stacking and then cutting with a hole cutter would be my idea. Looks like they were discontinued in the lamello product manual. I can see how these would be useful over the regular egg shaped variety that don't penetrate as far and are wider.
  11. Chestnut

    Christmas Dining Table

    I have 1 more fast project to wrap up before Christmas day. But it isn't complicated so it should go fast. Well i hope it goes fast I only have 10 days left.
  12. Chestnut

    Smoothing plane

    Preference some people love em some people hate em. Find a spot to take a few options for a spin. I suggest woodcraft or see if you can find another person in your area that has some hand tools you don't have. Or that other place you mentioned think it was highland ... but a 2 hour drive is unfortunate.
  13. Chestnut

    Smoothing plane

    I think it's been missed that he currently has a regular #4 and is looking to add a dedicated plane and is interested in the high angle. I agree with Derek's comment above that a smoother needs to be nimble. One of these days I'll tune up my #3 and take it for a spin. I have a feeling that it'd turn into my go to smoother. Not sure why i'm dragging my feet there.... I think the switching might have more merit in a shop that wasn't already well equipped but based off his plane list i feel like the dedicated plane route is more suitable to his style. It's not like he only has a LN #5 1/2 and is looking for his first smoother. Having a BD 45 degree #4 and a BD 50 degree #4 i can't say that it is as you say "much much harder to push" if anything it's barley noticeably harder to push. I use my Stanley and LN 50 degree back to back a lot and notice more drag when the wax wears off than any difference between the plane frog angles. I know you have far more experience than i do so i believe you, so am I missing something?
  14. Chestnut

    Smoothing plane

    That's the same premise as switching the blade on the low angle planes but i haven't heard of any one that does that. Is this something that people actually do or is it just a sales thing? I guess i just don't see the the time it takes to switch the frog to add up to a savings to make the switch worth it. Also you'd have to have the 5 1/2 6 or 7 to make it worth while as well. Not sure if his 5 1/2 6 or 7 are Stanley or LN i thought they were Stanley but i could be wrong. Also i don't see much utility in the higher angle frog in the fore and joitner planes so the switch would result in one disassembled plane waiting for it's frog back. A lot of this is opinion and preference so i think @Tmize will need to take the 2 conflicting pieces of advice and see how they work with his tool usage.
  15. Chestnut

    Sawstop folding outfeed table

    I think they designed it with woodworkers in mind and made it holey so that it wouldn't get filled with crap so you can always fold it down. I'd get clever and put a piece of ply on top so my crap wouldn't fall through. Then it'd always be in the way so i'd just end up using my bandsaw .... I guess they really are dedicated to keeping us safe.
  16. Chestnut

    Bandsaw Jigs and Thing$

    Yikes. I think the drift master fence from laguna offers some similar capabilities with a much lower price tag. Also not sure i like that you basically have to use double stick tape to attach the work to the fence. Where as a fence with incremental adjustment would not require that. It's a very interesting idea though.
  17. Chestnut

    Smoothing plane

    Would you ever switch your frogs though? I don't know that i'd call this a huge advantage. I don't even know how the frog comes out of a LN plane.
  18. Chestnut

    Christmas Dining Table

    I finally took a picture of my plans thought i'd share them. It's nice once you've designed and built a few things how much easier the initial design becomes. Also the measurements are more goals than hard and fast hit numbers. I kicked around a couple leg designs. Still needed to attack the BB ends to the extension rails. I did this the same was as i attacked the extension rails. A bolt and taped threads. I had previously done all the flattening and cleanup on the to with my #4. I'd been doing it incrementally as i fiddled with the other things and smoothing large panels is enjoyable work. For the top i made sure the grain was all pointing the same direction so i wouldn't have to change direction from board to board on the top. This turned out really nicely and allowed me to get the whole top smooth with minimal tear out. I wanted to leave it as a hand plane finish but decided to sand it flat. 30 seconds after sharping my #4 i hit something that put a nick in the blade.... . I cut the bottom bevel with the track saw set to 45 degrees and used an adjustable square to make sure the edge was spaced off properly. Then I spent a good 30 min staring at my sander going up through the grits starting at 180 grit and ending at 180 grit . The minor tear out melts away fast and there was 1 spot of bad chip out that i left to remind the people sitting at it that the table was hand made. I started the application of my go to finish. Wiping poly. This is always the best part. There is a ton of what i'm going to call micro figure everywhere on this cherry. Not sure how the lumber yard gets it all it must be rejects from the mill work snobs that think this figure is a defect or something.... the lumber industry always seems backwards to me.
  19. Chestnut

    Arm R Seal on chair arms

    Your poly went bad. I've had some that gets old and this is what happens to it.
  20. Chestnut

    Christmas Dining Table

    I finished the base while i was working on the top and than the few Christmas gifts that got in the way. I'm starting finish on the top parts now. I have the non extended table top that will be the 1 piece that i finish as a completed part just because it's easier to do it that way than separated Thanks again for all your help and input. Your help and ideas helped tremendously. I know you got the idea from someone else but if it wasn't for your post i'd have never found it.
  21. Chestnut

    Christmas Dining Table

    @Chet Did you apply finish to your top will all parts assembled on the base or did you do each part separately? I'd like to get the base out of my shop so i don't damage it. Every day is in here is another day i could drop something on it.
  22. Chestnut

    Smoothing plane

    So i have the Stanley #4 and the LN #4 and the LN #4 is more tailored to larger hands. My Stanley fits my hand awesome and the LN is a bit bulky for me. I have small hands though. I will defiantly agree that my Stanley #4 is m most comfortable plane as well Ross. I've almost a few times made a custom tote for my LN #4 to fit my smaller hands. I will some day when i don't have as many projects that i'd like to get done. This might be my BD bias or maybe I just prefer Cherry to what ever LV makes their hand planes from but I personally can't stand the look of LV tools. The wood they use on their handles is just plane ugly....
  23. Chestnut

    Smoothing plane

    If you are a bevel down guy don't consider the BU planes they will just leave you disappointed. I have 1 BU plane and it sits on the shelf 99.9% of the time. I'd honestly suggest against a 4 1/2 if you want to do a higher angle frog. The 5 degree difference is enough to add some extra resistance adding the extra width and you'll get tired faster and probably get less work done than if you had the narrower plane. Also bronze body.... #rustnomore. The 50 degree frog is enough of a departure from my Stanley #4 that it handles most all tear out. It's not going to do the trick on wood that have tear out when you look at them wrong. Though i don't know there is much you can do there other than a card scraper. The 55 degree is another step in the right direction but when i went to the LN hand tool event the sales guy told me that unless i worked with interlocked jungle woods all day every day it's not worth it. That being said i firmly believe that the blade makes a HUGE difference. I have a PMV-11 in my type 15 Stanley #4 and only grab for my LN 50 degree #4 when i do work on curly cherry or curly maple. Other wise i use it as my keep as sharp as possible for those 2 difficult spots plane or that 10%. If you can make it to a hand tool event you can get free shipping when you order there. Also if you are a member of the wood whisperer guild i'm pretty sure they have a 10% discount still. I see that they are having an event near me again. I'll probably go and buy myself a birthday gift from the government again like i did last year. Not sure what i'm going to go after this year though.
  24. Chestnut

    Phenolic vs Cast Iron

    Like what kind of time frame are we talking about? 1yr 5 yr 10yr? Does it help if you don't have a motor in their full time? I remove the motor from my table more often than it's in there.
  25. Chestnut

    Wall mounted art clipboard

    Flush cut and hand planes it is. You have that nice bench for good work holding right there in the background. A router jig would do it but i'd be willing to bed you'd be most of the way done by the time you finished making the jig for a small project like this.