Minnesota Steve

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About Minnesota Steve

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  • Woodworking Interests
    Making stuff for around the home.

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  1. I have a plywood cabinet under my router... but I drilled holes in the back of the cabinet directly across from the collector port to increase air flow. I was getting a lot of pressure on the router plate such that the inner plastic ring was deforming.(I have the older Rockler lift). So doing this helped with that, as well as helped with dust collection. I put the holes down near the base of the containment area, so as to help lift any dust falling to the bottom. I just used a 1" drill bit and put in multiple holes, I just kept drilling until it felt right, think there are 4-6 ho
  2. French cleats should be screwed into the studs. Then it'll hold the weight. BTW, as far as finishes go. I've actually had better luck with wipe on finishes like Arm-r-seal from General Finishes. Less smell than the water based poly. Basically you'll just have to experiment.
  3. Bosch mrp23evs has a trigger in the handle.
  4. It mostly boils down to one of these: Pilot hole too small Pilot hole not deep enough Countersink not deep enough I found this chart to help with pilot hole sizes... hard woods require bigger pilot hole than soft woods. https://www.boltdepot.com/fastener-information/wood-screws/Wood-Screw-Pilot-Hole-Size.aspx Don't use an impact driver on small screws...(anything #8 or smaller... #10 or bigger seem to handle it) use a drill/driver and set the clutch down pretty low, like a 3-5 range. Then hand screw it the rest of the way. The drivers tend to hid
  5. I flew to Philly to pick up our puppy... it was just a seat on American. I think I would have preferred a private charter. :-)
  6. That looks really nice. How heavy is it to lift up into place?
  7. I have a Makita GA4530, so it's a 4.5" runs about 6 amps, and it has the on/off switch. I've never used it for woodworking.... it's been metal and masonry. But I really wish I had a paddle and not the on/off switch. It's really important to turn the thing off when your shifting position, anytime you take your second hand off the grinder. That's a lot easier with a paddle. That's just me though. Since you must have a Menards near by given you had a masterforce. I would suggest the Metabo(formerly Hitachi). Looks like it's on say for $59 with their 11% rebate... And it's a pad
  8. We live about two miles from the University of Minnesota arboretum, and I've been there many times although I've never been in the library portion and didn't realize this existed. They have a rather large collection of Nakashima furniture that was commissioned back in the 1970s. There's an article in the newspaper today talking about their annual preservation/cleaning project. There's a few pictures in there of tables and chairs in the collection. https://www.startribune.com/at-minnesota-landscape-arboretum-rare-nature-inspired-furniture-is-preserved/569867512/ Here they give
  9. I have a set of metal legs from Ikea which is an inner tube with an outer tube and there is a screw you tighten down to lock them in place. I think that's acceptable for metal. Mine are the old Galant system, similar to this Bekant frame... https://www.ikea.com/us/en/p/bekant-underframe-for-table-top-black-30252906/ But if you are using wood, then I think the wooden peg or even a steel pin with a cotter pin through holes would be better. A desk/table has a fair amount of down force, and you have to factor in someone leaning against it to reach behind for something, even sitting o
  10. I still have a Jet JJP-8BT combo unit. This is what people talk about when they say don't buy a combo. From reading reviews though I think the 8" might work better than the 10", hard to say they're very similar. https://www.jettools.com/us/en/p/jjp-8bt-8-jointer-planer-combo/707400 It's not great, but it doesn't work too bad either... I would say it's comparable to a benchtop jointer with a planer as a bonus. It depends on what you are doing. I have been able to do quite a bit with it as a compromise. They're really common/popular in Europe... but that's the downside, pa
  11. It's fascinating how every year companies increase the prices they charge. But they don't give employees raises... Where are these increased costs coming from?
  12. Yeah, these things... (uk link for op) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shop-vac-901-02-Filter-Bags-Pack/dp/B07F3CD3W8 Or they also sell the paper bags for use inside the shop-vac. I've always used those when I'm going mobile and cleaning up crap. I try to avoid having to clean the filter as it just makes a bloody mess even outdoors. Otherwise the Dust Deputy... I see it's a bit expensive in the UK(likely because it's USA made and has to be shipped), but I've had one for 9 years and had really good luck with it. https://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Dust-Deputy-Cyclone-Kit/dp/B002GZLC
  13. A little Bondo will fix that right up. What color you planning to paint this?