gee-dub

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gee-dub last won the day on March 25

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About gee-dub

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    Master Poster

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  • Location
    : SoCal
  • Woodworking Interests
    Furniture for your home and office in general. Greene and Greene influenced in particular.

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  1. gee-dub

    Hand tool cabinet in maple

    Lovin' it.
  2. gee-dub

    Dewalt 735 helical cutter

    Good reports here and elsewhere from people who have run knives and inserts long enough to demonstrate the financial value of insert heads, including me. I think it was close to two years before the first rotation on my jointer. A bit longer on my planer. Preparation and care during the process will help with consistent results when rotating; torque wrench, compressed air, etc. The realization that a machine does not leave a final surface is a step many of us make at some point in our journey. The discussion of putting a $500 head in a $500 planer is another thread ;-) This decision includes space and dust collection as much as it does dollars. I do not recall ever seeing a thread titled "Woe is Me! Why Did I Ever Switch to an Insert Head!?!" As an aside, my jointer head paid for itself in about 18 months.
  3. gee-dub

    Clamp

    Immortan D's got it. I have several single and double pad versions. They also work for alignment on odd assemblies.
  4. gee-dub

    Thin Epoxy Adhesive

    What is the grip requirement? Would a thin CA work? I have some that is just like water that I use for hairline cracks.
  5. gee-dub

    New Jet Planer

    that makes sense.
  6. gee-dub

    New Jet Planer

    So I’ve got a move the cutter head and the motor assembly weight to adjust the cutting depth… I guess I’d want to see how that feels.
  7. gee-dub

    45 mitres

    It is a frame within a frame. The outer frame has a strip of leopard wood laid in prior to machining. The angle of the other picture made the inner edge of the outer frame look like a strip but, it is actually a Peruvian walnut outer frame with an inlay.
  8. gee-dub

    45 mitres

    A panel saw and a miter saw are fine tools for the tasks they are designed for. Trimming out a kitchen and building a furniture-quality sideboard are different tasks. A lot of folks turn to miter sleds on their tablesaws for this task. There are even versions where the angle doesn't need to be perfect as long as the two mating faces are cut on opposite sides of the jig. What works for you is what works. I just run a basic Incra V-27 miter gauge on the tablesaw. This is not necessarily super helpful. Someone showing me the air-tight dovetails they can cut by hand does not make my fussy attempts at them any better . I needed to work at it till I found the method that worked best for me (and I'm still not very good at them). If you Google 'miter sled for table saw' you will get a selection of methods to try. One of them will become your favored way of doing this.
  9. gee-dub

    Need help with picking plywood

    I pulled this from an ".au" site but the grades line up with ours here in the US. Not that it matters since the cost is prohibitive, here's the BB ply grading system: The CD material will probably have internal voids which make it ill suited for jigs. I would lean toward the MDF unless you needed certain structural strength that some larger assemblies require. Having said that, we work with what we can get. My home state of California has degraded in some areas so that I have to pick up certain items when I am out of state. Fortunately it is a long narrow state and Nevada and Arizona are only a few hours away. I'll stop rambling; I would have some MDF on hand in your 1/4", 1/2" and 3/4" equivalents. I would have some plywood around too as it can be used with the MDF if that sort of flex or sag resistance is needed. Some BC would probably do you well and you wouldn't have to buy in whole sheets. Most lumber yards around here carry what is called 'shop grade' plywood which is not an actual grade at all. This can be some A-C or B-C that didn't quite make the grade (no pun intended) and has some minor defects. Different yards will have different product that they sell for this purpose. Some will also sell edge-damaged sheet goods at a discount. A lot of folks overlook this thinking they need a perfect sheet of material. The fact is the first thing you are going to do when you use it is cut a piece out of it so you can judge the price by what your use-case is and save some money there. I just picked up a half dozen sheets of some tempered hardboard at half price due to damaged edges where it had been strapped too tight during transport. It can take some time to find your available sources for materials and consumables. Carry on and good luck.
  10. gee-dub

    Need help with picking plywood

    No, that is pretty much just general use building grade ply. You can sometimes find a product referred to as "Finnish" or "Russian" ply that is pretty much like Baltic Birch.
  11. gee-dub

    Need help with picking plywood

    What a goof I am sometimes . . . left is BB.
  12. gee-dub

    Cherry Wall Cabinet

    Material selection is one of my favorite parts of a project.
  13. gee-dub

    The Nut House V2

    Don’t laugh, I keep a 2 x 4 in the rack and slowly but surely eat it up doing all sorts of odds and ends tasks. When it gets short I just pick up another one next time I’m at the BORG
  14. gee-dub

    New storage shed

    That's gotta feel pretty good. Congrats.
  15. gee-dub

    Mortise Pal router jig

    I have a domino and I still love my Mortise Pal . Had I known they were going to stop making them I never would’ve sold my original version when I bought the new version shown in your link.