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About ClassAct

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    Journeyman Poster

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  • Woodworking Interests
    Learning, doing, enjoying.
  1. Shop security and cameras

    Fun fact: some jurisdictions require two-party consent to record voice or video. If you live in one of those states and don't have a sticker, then the recordings are not admissible in court. Posting visible "You on camera, fool!" at doors or windows means that any fool who continues to enter has given constructive consent to be recorded. Important note: even if the recordings are not admissible in court, they can still be used to help apprehend the fool. Better safe than sorry; post the stickers. Fun story from the Real World: my wife works for a Federal judge and they get the usual run of criminals including bank robbery. In one case, an out-of-custody defendant vigorously protested her innocence, despite a video showing her entering the bank for the robbery. The court ordered a plea conference between the feds and the defendant. The defendant shows up to the plea conference wearing the same outfit she was wearing when she boosted the bank. Everyone did a double-take, heads pivoting between the video footage and the defendant. She pled shortly thereafter.
  2. A couple of shop improvements

    I think it was the built-in drinks cabinet that added all that weight.
  3. Post It Note Projects

    Post-it note projects? Heck, I have a three-page spreadsheet of projects big and small from magazines, listing the project, magazine issue, and reason for wanting it. Sure, there are several Morris chair "recipes" on there, but when I get around to doing a chair I'll have several plans to choose from or modify as the case may be. I still follow Marc's build-or-buy decision-making tree, because I won't be able to make all the projects on the list before heaing to the great woodshop in the sky. I like having a fun list of stuff that I can do, though.
  4. Hide Glue

    Old Brown Glue. I think The Schwarz has been proselytizing brown glue recently. I'll get a bottle of OBG for my next project and try it. I don't have any religious preferences for or against the ubiquitous Titebond, but I do like the thought of OBG not interfering with finishes. Reversability isn't a concern for me; my stuff will never be in a museum a hundred years from now. I also like to support small businesses whenever I can. If I can do that with OBG and get the same results as Titebond, then I'll go with OBG.
  5. What Sealer?

    Hmm. If it was my piece of cherry, I'd use it for something else. It doesn't seem right to shape it, drill a few holes in it, and then seal it. Maybe I'd try to create an arts-n-crafts-looking toothbrush holder with small strips of cherry, or even set my hand to some carving (trying the carving first on a test block of some other wood). But it's your block of cherry -- do whatever brings you joy! As for sealing, I'd say a wipe-on poly like Arm-R-Seal will do you just fine.
  6. What to finish...

    A few thoughts: Whatever your health issues are, take a look at doing some physical therapy. Even for serious illnesses, moving around helps the body maintain strength, flexibility and endurance. Ideally your therapist can suggest exercises that help reinforce woodworking muscles. As to forgetting where you were in a project, it can help to keep a notebook and write down what you finish, even if it's a mundane step like "calibrate table saw." That way it can help you recall what you were doing before the trail was lost. If even your current pending projects seem daunting, do something simpler but relevant. Built a jig or some shop furniture. Sometimes the biggest hurdle is just getting started, and working on items that don't have a high emotional investment can help you get back in the saddle again. Get the easy win and go from there!
  7. Thank you folks! Next up: Queen Anne highboy from repurposed popsicle sticks.
  8. The tale starts at BoardGameGeek, where I was reading about vaulted game tables. One thread was about building a table from some guy named The Wood Whisperer. Well, I checked it all out and despite what I saw, I ended up here. Some of you may not think that a good thing. I enjoy playing games, including conflict simulations, aka "wargames," but I have two, make that two-and-a-half problems. The first two are our Maine Coon cats, Loki Furr and Luci Furr. They enjoy playing games too but for different reasons. The remaining half-problem is my beautiful bride, who fully supports my hobbies but who also appreciates having things tidy around the house. To sum up, I need a vaulted game table so I can leave more complex games set up without having to clear them away after only a couple of hours. Being a bear of very little brain, with very little disposable income, and no garage or basement for a shop, I only have my father-in-law's shop that I can use. It is forty-five minutes to an hour and a half away depending on traffic. To make a short story long, I end up using parts from three different kitchen tables that I scrounged off Craigslist. The "Free" section is great, especially around the end of the month when people are moving and can't take things with them. I used the apron from one table, the legs from a second, and the top from a third. I lined the apron with 15mm (5/8") Baltic birch plywood... Then built a leaning rail out of BB and trimmed with poplar... Attached svelte and sexy legs instead of bulbous farmhouse legs... Stained everything... Et voila! FRANKENGAMINGTABLE! I also added a 3mm neoprene insert which deadens noise, gives some "cush" for picking up cards and gaming pieces, and just happens to look awesome. Some additional construction details: * The whole thing is designed to knock down into pieces for moving. The largest single piece is the Baltic Birch table bottom, at 3' x 5'. * The corner triangle pieces are floating to give access to the hangar bolts from above the table. * Dowels secure the leaning rail to the aprons. A "key" dowel, slightly larger than the others, is used for proper alignment. * The top was ripped lengthwise and a board added to help cover the leaning rail. It was also cut into three pieces for easy removal and replacement by one person. Did I have fun doing it? Hell yes! Did I make mistakes? Oh hell yes, many of which are visible but I'm not going to point them out. Did I learn from my mistakes? You betcha! I now have a gaming table that seats four comfortably, six in a pinch, and will resist the best efforts of any annoyed gamer to flip the table. It may not be "fine furniture" but it will put up with the slings and arrows of enemies real and imaginary, probably get beverages spilled on it, and provide hours of fun and good times for me and my gaming friends. Thanks everyone for answering my questions, reading this far, and I hope you get inspired to build your own table.
  9. Coffee Container...thing.

    Great project with great results, and I like your coffee setup. Now go and buy a Vetrano 2B Evo espresso machine and get cranking on the quality brew! I want to see more from you, because (a) your sense of humor is like mine, and (b) you have about as much home shop as I do. Well, more, as you have a table saw. Otherwise my gear looks about like yours. What's your next project?
  10. The Nut House V2

    That's good. I'd hate to see you use sheets that were removed after a Code Brown went down.
  11. My first efforts in Woodworking

    I showed my wife and she liked them too. We like that they're artistic without going over the line into cutesy. Tasteful, artistic, well-crafted. Great work, Arie!
  12. Versatile router table

    I'd call the Woodsmith crew's delivery matter-of-fact. I much prefer that to over-the-top or waaga-waaga. Too many vloggers think the only way to interest an audience is to talk fast and over-emote. But boy, I could listen to and watch Frank Klausz all day long. I downloaded their router table plans (free, for now) and added it to my one-of-these-days list. Have to get a shop first.
  13. mission style night table

    Very nice table for your guests! Ours are lucky if they get a collapsible TV tray.
  14. Bucks County PA.

    Welcome aboard, Arie! My ancestors were from the Netherlands. I stayed in Utrecht for a week on business years ago; I must get back some time to visit. Wonderful country, wonderful people. Maybe I'm biased. I'm in a similar house like you; we have no basement, no garage, no shed, so I can't make sawdust to any significant degree. Most of my stuff has to be done outside, so my setup has to be portable and capable of being broken down for storage. Sounds like a bandsaw is a good next choice for a power tool, though a circular saw and some track guides can help you break down lumber. You can do that outside without raising too much fuss from the neighbors. I've seen jigs to turn a circular saw into a table saw; maybe that would work near-term too. Planers are great but they are very lout and very dusty. Consider a couple of hand planes instead; they make no noise, the shavings are easy to clean up, and you can work with them anywhere. Marc's book Hybrid Woodworking has good ideas on how to use hand tools alongside (and instead of) power tools. This forum is fantastic for help and ideas, too. You can post some of your questions above in the other forums where they'll get more eyeballs and probably more suggestions, too. Again, welcome aboard, and it's great to have you here!
  15. Shop Tour

    Gorgeous. Simply gorgeous.