Art

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Art last won the day on September 6

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About Art

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    Apprentice Poster

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Vancouver, BC
  • Woodworking Interests
    crafts

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  1. When I got mine, the plan was to get the blue one. I had always mocked people here with white vehicles, but when I saw a white Ridgeline in the dealer's lot, I realized it looked pretty sharp, so that's what I got. It stays amazingly clean. In the two years I've had it, I think it's been properly cleaned one time, and honestly still looks good!
  2. Or you could just invest in a vaguely truck shaped car: It works for me (Kidding of course, as these anything but cheap compared to the other options..)
  3. Art

    Bandsaw question

    It seems to be the tariffs. The G0817 which is about $2500 CAD is listed at $1425 on the US site.
  4. Art

    Bandsaw question

    I just had a look at their website, and they automatically convert their prices into CAD$. They are expensive! The equivalent saw to the two I'm looking at (14" 2-3hp, foot brake) is the G0817 and is listed at $2523 CAD. Without the brake (G0457) is $2060. The only one that seems reasonable is the 17" 2 hp G0513 Anniversary Edition at $1508, but no brake... Overall their pricing seem all over the place. Why would they price a 17" less than 14" with the same motor?
  5. Art

    Bandsaw question

    Thanks, Kev. For sure I'll give them a call.
  6. Art

    Bandsaw question

    I thought about that, but I'm not sure what the tariffs would do to the price. The good thing about both of these machines is that they are (presumably) imported directly into Canada, and therefore aren't subject to any new tariffs. Having said that I'll look into Grizzly. There's also a guy selling a Hammer N3800 locally, but he's asking $2800. I may shoot him a message to see if he'll take $2000. Edit - I just checked and the Hammer apparently doesn't have a brake. That's surprising to me...
  7. Art

    Bandsaw question

    Again thanks for the replies. The price difference doesn't just get you the brake. It is an increase in power, but also I'm from Canada where everything costs more compared to the US. In reality, the cost difference between the two Laguna models is closer to $500. There is a bigger price difference between the two Rikon models...
  8. Art

    Bandsaw question

    Thanks for all the replies. I know that the brake isn't the same as the one on the Sawstop (and Coop, you're right, the brake wouldn't have made any difference in Davids incident). Based on the feedback here, it sounds like those that have used saws with brakes are in agreement that they are a useful option. It sounds like it just comes down to money. I think I've made up my mind. When I do purchase, I post a pic
  9. Art

    Bandsaw question

    I realize that questions comparing new bandsaws have been done to death, but I'm looking for opinions on a very specific question. Is the brake a worthwhile option? I'm down to Laguna vs Rikon. Originally I was choosing between the Laguna 1412 and the Rikon 10-326, both of which I have no doubt would serve me perfectly. However, I would prefer to have a saw with a safety brake, which moves me up to the Laguna 14bx or the Rikon 10-353. This adds about $700 CAD to the price. However this also gets you a more powerful saw (2 1/2 or 3 hp vs 1 3/4). I already have 220 in the shop, so that isn't a big issue. My thinking is mainly from a safety point of view, as well as convenience. I already have a Sawstop, so that gives you an idea of how I value safety, and and my 10 year old daughter is spending more and more time in the shop with me, so this issue is always front of mind for me. To sum up: is this feature worth the price? To those that already have a brake, would you ever go back to a saw that doesn't have one? Thanks, Art.
  10. Art

    Houston shop tour

    Nice space. I agree with the "Most Important Thing in the Shop". I have one as well...
  11. Art

    Woodworking without woodturning

    I recently discovered that these drill press lathe attachments exist: https://www.amazon.ca/Woodstock-D4088-Lathe-Attachment-Drill/dp/B005W16YJS/ref=sr_1_1/143-0305279-9664667?ie=UTF8&qid=1535038056&sr=8-1&keywords=lathe+attachment+for+drill+press Does anyone here have any experience or comments about them? I thought it may make a reasonable tool for smaller turned items without having to invest in an actual lathe.
  12. Art

    Gilding engraved wood?

    I've sealed my gilding in the past using artist's varnish such as this: https://www.deserres.ca/en/lversat This isn't the exact one I've used, but is a similar product. A little goes a long way. Obviously this isn't meant for large furniture projects, but for small pieces it works great. I would talk to someone in an artist supply store who know what they are doing for specific product recommendations. Whenever I need artists materials I go to DeSerres, but I'm sure you can find a similar type store in the US.
  13. Art

    Gilding engraved wood?

    I've done a bit of gilding, so my first bit of advice would be to practice beforehand to get your technique down. If you use an artificial silver leaf product, they don't seem to tarnish as easily. If that is the case, why bother sealing them at all, since this isn't a project that is meant to last for a long time?
  14. Art

    I need one plane, but which one?

    I carved a pattern that required a cove-like depression using bench chisels to hog out the bulk and then refining the curves with a combination of sanding and curved scrapers. The finished product was quite smooth and even. The point was to use whatever you have for bulk removal and then take your time with scrapers to get the profile you want.
  15. Art

    Beginner - Impulse Buy

    I was where you were a couple of years ago. I got comfortable with my table saw by making a bunch of shop cabinets, mitre saw table and a hefty workbench/outfeed table (made out of 2x4s and a maple top from Ikea). The point was that I just started cutting stuff, getting familiar with the saw and how it reacted. I also spent a bunch of time looking at youtube videos on table saw safety, kickback, etc. I use some easy shop made push sticks and am always very wary. Just go for it, safely... It was only after I had made a bunch of shop furniture that I bought my first bit of hardwood and started messing with that.