Matt Truiano

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About Matt Truiano

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  • Woodworking Interests
    furniture, cabinet making, rustic

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  1. id like to add another. my kitchen cabinets are pretty much just shelves on the walls with a face frame and doors in front of them. the day i decided to make a pull out tray for a small "cabinet" under the wall oven was the day i started putting money aside for a new kitchen. not only could i not find anything close to a 90 degree angle, but level surfaces didn't exist either. a piece of edge banded ply and a set of drawer runners wound up taking me all night to get it to function and look half way straight to the naked eye.
  2. I have yet had a project go smoothly at my house whenever it comes to installation or repair. The most recent complaint i had was todays project of rebuilding the doors to my shed. all these years i've been living at this house, i always looked at the way the doors were constructed and asked "why isn't there a bottom piece to the frame of this door". But i just assumed it fell off at some point since the doors were in pretty bad shape and rotting away. I took the doors down, measured each piece and made new replicas. I screwed the new doors back to the old hinges (which were still attached to the shed) and what do i learn...the doors don't close...WTF! well i figured out the reason why there wasn't a bottom to the doors was because the floor of the shed takes a heavy dip at the right side of the double doors. And since the hinge side sat about an inch lower than the latch side, the bottom of the door wouldn't clear the opening after 50% of the swing to shut the door. i can go on with stories of similar frustration around my house. i figured it would be fun to open up a discussion about frustrating installs or repairs at home...maybe it will make me feel better about my house being a lopsided and rigged place.
  3. i made your typical cooler stand out of cedar. to right, theres a table top area with an inset lid that opens up to storage inside. i left the lid 3/16" smaller than the opening to allow for wood moment. Boy was that not enough. what was a sloppy lid in the sunshine, is a lid so tight that the entire unit lifts up when trying to lift the lid after it rains because it gets so tight. i have videos to show but this forum doesn't allow video files. the outside of the stand is coated in 4 coats of water based poly but all the insides are left unfinished. Partly because of laziness. partly because i wanted to preserve the smell of the natural cedar. I am to assume this is the reason why it expands so much? would sealing both sides of the wood prevent this?
  4. Dad life got in the way and actually haven't had the time to dive deeper into it
  5. Even if the bit is wider at the tip, that would result in a wider mortise and the domino should fit.
  6. The wood used here is cherry. It was cut on a glue line in this particular piece. But the 3 others had no glue line and it was the same measurements
  7. i recently went to use my festool domino (which being a full time dad doesn't allow me to use very often at all) and i came across the situation that the dominos themselves weren't fitting into the mortises i was making. my first thought was that the dominos expanded since the last time i used them and the rest of the bag is shot. but after some further investigating, i realized that the dominos were fine, but my mortises were undersized. WTF? so then i checked the diameter of my bit, and sure enough, its about a half mm smaller than the dominos. i've had the tool for less than a year and in that year i've only used it a hand full of times. only on cherry, walnut and red oak and pine. is that normal? anyone have similar situations? should i contact festool and ask for a replacement?
  8. I designed a small stool for my son with child safety in mind. Flared out legs, 45 degree corners and small. I came up with what i thought to be a simple project using dominoes for the joinery. but now after i cut the parts, i don't know how to set up the domino for accurate cuts on this particular piece. the leg aprons are mitered and will be joined to the square part of the leg which will no be mitered. initially i thought i would reference the tops of the boards but it turns out i don't have enough room and i would cut completely through the apron even with my smallest domino. i would like to have a 1/8" reveal. does anyone have any idea how to set this up to be repeatable for all 8 joints. Thanks in advance Also, my domino came with the attachment for mortising end grain of narrow boards but i can't seem to figure out how to attach it. any help there will be much appreciated as well.
  9. I built my son a bassinet out of cherry and he out grew it a few months ago. I've been hesitant about storing it in my attic for fear of it getting ruined by the drastic temperature changes and if there are any mice up there i worry they might scratch it up. Am i over thinking it? are there other things i should be concerned about with the attic? i don't think it gets humid up there. By the way I live in NY so in the summer the attic gets about 110+ and in the winter it gets in the 30s/40s
  10. They do a different process that I don't think I want to get involved with. But that's a good idea thanks
  11. I’m sure this has been said already but you can always check the used tool market on Craigslist. You can find some pretty sweet deals if you keep your eyes peeled. I just recently snagged a grizzly table saw that would have cost me over $2000 after shipping, for $350.
  12. I'm making a few mallets out of some scrap I have laying around. I have piece of walnut that would be perfect for the handle. It looks like it either had a loose knot that fell out or some rot, or maybe both. I was wondering if I fill the large void with west system epoxy, will it be strong enough to hold up to the abuse a mallet will encounter. Photos of the wood attatched.