Jean [Fr]

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About Jean [Fr]

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    Apprentice Poster

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    France
  • Woodworking Interests
    Anything (ab)out of wood, the contemporary way.

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  1. Jean [Fr]

    Triton Dual Dowel Machine

    Hey @Mark J, well sometimes you'd rather be in front of your workbench.
  2. Jean [Fr]

    Triton Dual Dowel Machine

    Hi there ! You guys are arguing about insert strength which does not really matter in frequent uses. Floating tenons, dowels, pocket holes, biscuits... have different strength for sure. BUT, as long as you use a modern wood glue, especially long grain on long grain, event without any alignment/reinforcement, the glue should be stronger than the wood itself. Obviously you can experience good results with any jointing system as long as the wood grain is properly oriented. End-grain is another story. Only long grain brings strength to a joint. So you want at least dowels or floating tenons. Biscuits or pocket screws would be weak in this situation. Biscuits are fine with modern glue and long grain applications. You want to consider traditional joinery, engineered when glues was not as good as today's. Ask yourself if the joint can be strong enough with a rabbit skin glue or so. You would not use biscuits without a proper glue, while dowels and floating tenons can hold only with friction. QED...
  3. Jean [Fr]

    Triton TDJ600 Doweling Joiner

    Domino machines are much better than the Triton. The TDJ600 works but it's not a great tool.
  4. Jean [Fr]

    Triton TDJ600 Doweling Joiner

    Hi there, In France we have a saying : (don't trust) the man who saw the man who saw the beast. I own a TDJ600. This is not the best quality ever, (what would you expect for the price tag ?) but mine works fine. I mean the holes are drilled in the right place, and joints are flawless, dowels are hold tight. Some precautions by the way : I check the fences with measuring tools and I don't trust the graduations. You really need to push hard to dig into the wood. It's not about poor quality bits, but about the spring which is ways too strong ! This is a sign of poor engineering. You really need a strong workbench to hold the pieces while pushing. (maybe 60 pounds of pressure ?) This is definitely not a woman friendly tool ! The foundry parts are barely deburred. The tool is functional, just comfortable enough to be hold. This is not like a Domino you can set then drill with confidence. With the Triton you need some test parts. But once the set up is done, you can work pretty quick. I probably drilled thousands of holes within a year with no issue. I would expect the spring had released a bit but nope, the machine works as new. I really need a proper spring. Note: the bits are compatible with Mafell's (+-20 bucks per set) so you can have 6mm ones. With Triton, the quality is not constant. Some tools are great, like the TRA001, some are just acceptable. The TDJ600 stands in between. Some comes directly from China manufacturer's general catalog, like the oscillating drum sander or the super jaws. You can't buy with confidence, get some owners advices first. I saw the video Mafell vs Triton. Well, to me this video smells like scam. First, is comparison between the best Cadillac versus a first price car fair ? Probably not. You need to compare things with the same price range. Unless you want to deliberately kill the cheapest's reputation or magnify the best. Second, before drilling the first hole the guys is already dismantling the Triton. So strange isn't it ? Who would do that in real life ? So we don't know if the problems comes from the Triton or from the guy's early "repairs". Let's be objective: after more than a year using mine, none of his 5mn judgments matches my experience. Some of my friends bought a TDJ600 after testing mine, with comparable experience. I know the Mafell which is obviously a great tool, ways better, at first sight you know it. There's a small chance he get the worst TDJ600 on earth. Maybe...
  5. Jean [Fr]

    Single vs double tenon

    In Europe a simple doweling jig have a great success, the Joint Genie. It's easy to make your own out of scrap wood if you're accurate enough. But I guess any jig from Rockler or whatever will do the trick. You can make your dowels from your Maple stock scraps, but Beech, Oak, Ash, Mahogany can work too. Please refer to a wood hardness chart to find species with a close hardness. Just avoid sap wood for dowels. Glue acts as a lubricant, so the same diameter, hole and dowel, is perfect.
  6. Jean [Fr]

    Single vs double tenon

    On the drawings the double tenons are too thick IMHO and the area in between the two tenons is too thin. Multiple tenons just allow a larger gluing surface, but are not stronger. Do you really need a larger gluing area ? Well, except oily woods or questionable glue type, you would probably not. The main thing to consider is the proportion mortise/tenon compared to your stock dimensions. Do a simple math : take your stock width, divide it by 3 and you'll get almost the good mortise/tenon size. (works both width and height). I agree with @gee-dub, I would use dowels on this kind of project. I usually use loose tenons or dowels, because you waste less stock. I was always disappointed by the amount of wasted wood removed from the stocks. When you use floating tenons or dowels, the needed stock is shorter and you minimize waste. The tenons and dowels can be made out scrap wood, whatever the size. I use real tenons only when pull dowels are needed. Choosing the right dowel is easy : you need at least the equivalent of the dowel diameter all over the dowel (the 1/3 rule again...). The more dowels you can put, the stronger. You can multiply dowels using staggered arrangement. The dowel or floating tenon hardness should be equivalent to the wood hardness. Sometime I see people using beech Dominos in pine projects : poor joints I'm afraid...
  7. Jean [Fr]

    Styrofoam and cardboard

    I try to recycle by myself most of the time. You can get a very strong material out of Styrofoam which can be polished to high gloss. Get a small bowl, and pour some acetone into it. The acetone will dissolve the Styrofoam, releasing the air embed inside. This way, large Styrofoam packaging can dissolve into a small "ball" of polystyrene. You can roughly make anything out of this "ball" : shaping it, wrapping it around tools to make scabbards or handles, you can pour it into a mold, make some boards or blocks you can machine later. I made furniture feet out of melded Styrofoam just by pouring it into small containers. I made quick storage furniture out of cardboard in the early 2000's years. Surprisingly it was very strong and really last. So I designed quality cardboard furniture for house or theater purpose. Here's some samples : Since, I always keep some cardboard sheets in the shop. You can fill torsion boxes with cardboard for extra strength or sound insulation purpose. Cardboard can make a good core material for composites too. It cost nothing and is really useful. All valuable materials in my opinion.
  8. Jean [Fr]

    CNC discussion space.

    That attached pic was my start back in 2003. If some of you guys are interested by the full genuine book, follow the link !
  9. Jean [Fr]

    CNC discussion space.

    I bring full automation to the table, absolutely ! If you just consider carving or bulk making of boring parts, I'm afraid you do not get what CNC machining is all about, or you just use a CNC at 10% of its capacity. I know some people will say that a 100% CNC process is not woodworking, or : what is left to the woodworker then ? Well, a lot ! Definitely, the most important is left to the woodworker. First, don't even think the machine will do a perfect job just pushing a button. CNC machining requires an high knowledge about wood to produce good results. You need to understand feed and speed, joinery, wood grain and wood species, how milling bits works versus wood, and so on. Basically : all the woodworker skills except the hand. This is highly woodworking, the most technical way. And the most important ever : you can focus on creation, and you will definitely spend more time on creation. A lot of woodworkers says the best woodworking time is when you apply the finish on. I'm one of them. And the second satisfying moment is when pieces comes together perfectly. I remember one of my first 100% CNC project with the satisfaction given by the hidden self locking joinery. So exciting ! Most of the time I have the CNC machines running while I work about the next project creation. I do 10 fully satisfying pieces in the time needed to do half a one with conventional ways. When a family member ask for a copy of an existing piece, it's just a breeze. You can rebuild broken parts in minutes. The more complex the workpiece is, the most easy it is to make it on a CNC rather than with conventional tools. But don't get me wrong, I still love working with my hand tools, but only on fast projects which allows me to finish within the time of CAD drawing. The single downside I found about 10 years of CNC machining (behind 30 years of conventional woodworking) is this that bad boys are not quiet.
  10. Jean [Fr]

    CNC discussion space.

    Probably there will be a growing interest about woodworking with CNC machines. There's a lot to say around the CNC stuff : commercial machines, DIY machines, cutting tools, process, realizations... I totally agree. Most of CNC forums, like CNC zone, mostly talks about DIY CNC machines and not that much about machining wood. Right Ken! We can say "go to YOUR room!" Very funny. That will be so delightful when we will see finally the growing interest of haters Not really, this is a shop within a shop. WT have Hand Tools, Power Tools, sections. I guess a CNC Machines section makes sense, as it is an apart way to do. The subject is comparable to the two others. IMHO a CNC machine cannot be considered as a power tool, it is a different process, a different workflow. You can (and you should) make an entire piece out of a CNC including joinery and finishing. I feel uncomfortable... People still does not understand what a CNC machine process means in 2017. We're not back to several years ago when Popular Woodworking was claiming the CNC router was the perfect tool to make jigs ! What ?!? But CNC is just all about no more jigs ever ! I can't understand there's still so much rivers to cross while some of us use this technology for 10 years ! My kingdom for a CNC Machines section ! Or we will be glued in the XXe century forever !
  11. Jean [Fr]

    CNC discussion space.

    So do I ! Well, this topic is not about "Is CNC woodworking" or "Would I get a CNC", It's just about a dedicated section of this forum which would be a good thing IMHO. A section on a forum helps a lot members or newcomers to find the required information quickly. I guess CNC questions should naturally comes more and more frequently anyways. @wdwerker Except if you're very uncomfortable with software, programming a CNC router is not really difficult as you probably already know about feed and speed, downcut and so on. As you are a regular poster on this forum, I believe you are skilled enough to try a simple CNC soft like Vcarve. You raise an important question at the same time : CNC stands for any machine controlled by a computer. Most of you are using CNC instead of CNC router. But there's CNC lasers, plotters, plasma cutters, welders, painters, pick & place... Well it's definitely endless. We should definitely use "CNC Routers" (or the proper kind) instead of the generic term "CNC" which means not that much. I own several CNCs : Router, Laser, Plotter, 3D printer, and most of the conventional tools too. So if you've got some questions, I would be honored to answer. A dedicated section would be a plus to talk about CNC stuff, which is a world apart. At least nowadays. CNC can potentially change your whole workflow, by the way. I mean with a lot of benefits. Just a thought about machines. Actually, it don't comes some one's mind that a table saw or a router is not woodworking. But by the past, some woodworkers considered power tools as unwanted goofy tools. And reason comes through, and we all use power tools nowadays. Tomorrow we will probably see topics named "CNC router or Tablesaw : what should I buy first ?"
  12. Jean [Fr]

    A better way to mix epoxy... maybe

    Well, you're right. I will not give it a try, because I do not have much time for experiments and I have proper mixing devices. In a way, I'm an old resin user (boatworks, like @Tom King) and experience brings some reflexes. Just like a too small tenon, or a weak joint, you get it at first sight. I understand it can be considered as subjective or presumptuous. If you give it a try, do it with a reasonable batch, at least 10oz. IMHO small batches should not show that much. Hardener first, resin on top (the opposite should be less efficient), and let's see how good the mix will be. Then you should find a way to get resin from the lower corners only (maybe from a hole in the bottom of the cup). You will probably note than the gel and/or curing time is different with resin from the top and from the bottom. That will demonstrate the mix is not even. And the problem should be increased with Polyester resin, and less present with 1:1 ratio resins. Good luck
  13. Jean [Fr]

    A better way to mix epoxy... maybe

    Well, I'm sorry you consider my two cents as negative. Maybe I sound too strong as usual. I apologize for my bad english. If you know a minimum about resins, you will agree how important a good mix is. There's methods to try to avoid issues (multiple long pours, double cup mix...) because proper resin mixing can be tricky. I usually die the hardener prior to mix. This is not risk free, but it gives a valuable indication of the achievement of a good mix. Sometimes you're not focused enough while mixing (especially on long days of epoxy stuff by numbers) and even if the colour looks even, the mix can be not stirred enough, and the punishment comes quickly : weak bond and/or never cure areas. So, I would not be confident about the "simple verification" process. About the "is not already done" thing, we should stop just a minute and use common sense. Resins and polymers is an important, profitable and innovative industry for several decades. Since the 50s, every day, thousands of qualified R&D engineers all over the world works on polymer resins. There's a variety of possible mixing solutions, including vibratory slab, which is definitely not a recent technology... Would you believe that nobody tried except a man in his garage who lost the recipe during 20 years ? Let's agree any possible mixing methods has been obviously tested several times during the passed 60 years... If the vibratory mixing of resins were at least workable, this is so simple that you could find several in any shop, instead of expensive or slow mixing systems available today. We're mostly in the copy era, sometimes we can improve existing concepts, but we don't have much to invent. Only hi end technology invents nowadays. All the contemporary resin mixing machines have a slow motion mechanical stirrer (except pressure guns). Note in the concrete industry vibratory technology is used to remove bubbles and compact the mix, with long vibratory rods deep inside or this does not work, but this is to stabilize the concrete, not for mixing. Actually, the single vibratory mixing system I know is for paint mixing when you ask for a custom colour at your local DIY store. That industrial machine works obviously much harder than an orbital sander. Even if paint is more fluid than epoxy and paint dies are even more fluid, The mix is not complete at all after this 5mn process. Back home, you have to stir your paint for a long time for a proper mix. The bottom and sides area did not even get the dies. That's no surprise to me. IMHO, the single benefit of this system is to have no stirring tool to clean between uses.
  14. Jean [Fr]

    A better way to mix epoxy... maybe

    I've been a huge user of epoxy for 30 years. I've done maybe all you can do with epoxy, from simple gluing to hi-end composites. I've got all you can dream of to work with resin, from vacuum chamber to pressure mixing gun. Please don't get me wrong, I'm not the kind of guy who will spend extra time or effort if there's a safe way do save on those. But I won't trust this method because it can't produce a consistent mix, even with a very fluid epoxy. In the best scenario, vibrations will produce a vortex inside the cup, but this is not guarantee, especially with thick epoxies or during cold days. The vortex will just mix the epoxy in a cone shape in the middle-top area of the cup. Sides will not be mixed the same way. Probably you get unmixed epoxy on the bottom corners of the cup. I won't risk a bad bond with sorcerer's apprentice tricks anyways. Corian is acrylic resin with mineral charges, this is different from epoxy or polyester. You want to feel the mix and the way the resin reacts that particular day, because each day is particular with epoxy. Bubbles are a factor only in vacuum stratification because it will expend (a lot!). For a glass finish top you get rid of bubbles in seconds with a gas torch. There's three important points with epoxy : proportions, mix and climate (temperature/moisture). You're right on this or you fail. Simple as that. Mixing epoxy by hand is not difficult or time consuming, why would I save on one of the most important factor ? Resin can be tricky sometimes, I don't want to introduce another hazardous parameter in the recipe. Nowadays, there's not much to invent or to learn about stuff. If you can't find the method in industrial applications, there are reasons why.
  15. Jean [Fr]

    Preparing for a Roubo Build

    Well, if you plane the top by hand, don't worry about the weight. If this is a split top even more. You can do the job on a pair of sawhorses in a location parallel to the final workbench spot. When time will come to move the top (or the split halfs) you only lift one end and pivot on the other end to put the end roughly in place, then do the same with the other side. This way, you will only carry maybe 30% of the overall weight. Note: if you use dominos or dowels to align top chunks you probably don't need to run the top on a planer. You can do the final finish directly on the top (planning and/or sanding), it's no big deal.