Richiep

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    rough cut lumber, shop setup, lamps and lighting, shop carts and efficiency, turning...

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  1. UPDATE So this has been out in the world for a couple of months now and the sag continues. I've been working on site where this is used and have kept a close eye on it. When I delivered it it was around 1/8th inch of sag now it's around 1/4in. I told the client I would make it right! To do so my plan is to rebuild the base/torsion box. What I'll do differently this time is use glue and I'm going to double up the framing. Here's what I'm thinking dry fit on the ground. I have some liquid nails and I was thinking of using that to adhere the plywood to the frame. I'm hoping this will make a bomber foundation that won't sag.
  2. Side note. I'm increasingly impressed with magnetic strips for storing metal tools like screw drivers, chisles, drill and router bits, jig hardware and on and on. I guess it's these magnetic strips that got me to questioning the value of pegboard. Anyway here's a shot of one of my strips. Note that I have this set up so the magnet can be accessed from both sides.
  3. Wow, thanks for the feedback everyone! I had no idea I'd get this much response. It's always cool to see how others are setting up shop spaces. Thanks again! Rich
  4. Hey All, I'm doing some organizing in a pole barn for a client and I;m setting up a workbench and maybe a pegboard. I've installed a fair amount of peg board over the years and it's been okish. I once worked with a guy who absolutely hated pegboard and he set up his shops with a vertical sheet of plywood. From there he drove screws to hang his tools and oultined them. Since then I've always wanted to try it. I think I'm gonna give the plywood method a go for my client and hope it works out. What are your preferences/experience? Thanks! Rich
  5. My dad suggests that I seek out a custom cabinet maker and have them put it together. It'll probably be a faster turn over and at a cheaper price. I'm gonna look into this. What do you guys think? Thanks Rich
  6. Hey All, I've been tasked with copying the design of some existing red oak kitchen cabinets. I've done a fair bit of woodworking over the years but this will be a new endeavor. You've probably seen the design I'm trying to replicate a million times. I have a shaper and possibly even the bits to make the joinery, I'll have to dig. But my question is what kind of jig do I need to make to replicate the arc at the top. Tools I could use would be; bandsaw, router, jigsaw, other... whatever I do I need a consistent, clean fit between the panel and the top rail. How can I make this happen? Thanks Rich
  7. Richiep

    Shop wiring

    As someone said above, "lighting is subjective". My preference for shop lighting is 4000K, I find it to be more of a neutral color. I think the 5000k stuff has too much blue in it. For the last year or so I've been installing 4000K LED shop lights from Home Depot; I just tried to find them online but came up short. But they're on display in the shop lighting section if you want to check them out in real life. I'd suggest when you wire up your lights to use 2 or more switches. In my shop I have one switch for the workbench area, where I spend most of my time, and another for the rest of the shop. Good luck! Rich
  8. Yeah, I tried six wheels for a minute on one of my previous builds and quickly decided to take them off. Even on a flat shop floor it didn't handle well. I don't remember the specifics but it quickly became apparent that six wheels would be problematic.
  9. I considered using glue for the base but decided against it, my thinking at the time was a screw spacing every 4 inches would be enough.
  10. Hey All, I just delivered my latest shop cart which came out pretty good for the most part; with one exception, I'll get to that in a minute. The cart will be used in a pole barn on a moderately level concrete floor and spend most of it's time against a wall. It'll be rolled out occasionally and people will work on it from all sides. I started with a simple frame made of 2x3 pine boards, I could have used 2x4s but I wanted that extra inch of vertical space and 2x3's should be plenty strong for this. I don't have a picture but the frame also has 3 more cross braces. 94" X 29" I then sandwiched the frame with 2 sheets of 15/32 plywood, this made a torsion box. I used lots of screws spaced approximately ever 4 inches. This made for strong ridgid base. Next I attached 4 inch locking casters. I've become a bit of caster connisseur as of late and find these from Home Depot to be some of the best on the market. They're economical and high functioning. With a strong foundation I built the carcass from 2x4s using Kreg pocket holes for the joinery. Drawers made of 1/2 A/C plywood and Kreg pocket holes. The cart is 29 inches wide but I only made the drawers 24 inches deep. This made some "dead space" which I later made into cubbies. I attached the top particle board to the carcass using 2x2 pine boards and Kreg holes. The top is edge banded with Red Oak. I'm still learning how to make good clean miter cuts... Luckily most of this was covered with laminate White Oak drawer faces finished with Cherry colored stain and poly finish I finished the ends with pegboard for some additional storage. All and all it came out pretty well and the customer loves it. But one thing is bothering me. At some point late in the build I discovered that the cart has a slight sag in the middle. I put a straight edge on the top and discovered about 3/32 or so of sag in the top and maybe 1/8 inch sag at the torsion box. This really bummed me out, I thought for sure the torsion box was bullet proof. Maybe I should have used six casters instead of four? I could go back and install a couple more casters. Or even easier I could install some shims between the counter top and the carcass, but I don't know... I kinda feel like now that it's all put together that it's not gonna sag much more and I'm obsessing; I've been accused of being a perfectionist in the past.... But I just don't know. What do you guys think? For future builds I'll bite the bullet and use full sized 2x4s instead of the 2x3s. Or maybe I'll use six casters.... Thanks for reading. Rich
  11. Hey All, I just delivered my latest shop cart which came out pretty good for the most part; with one exception, I'll get to that in a minute. The cart will be used in a pole barn on a moderately level concrete floor and spend most of it's time against a wall. It'll be rolled out occasionally and people will work on it from all sides. I started with a simple frame made of 2x3 pine boards, I could have used 2x4s but I wanted that extra inch of vertical space and 2x3's should be plenty strong for this. I don't have a picture but the frame also has 3 more cross braces. 94" X 29" I then sandwiched the frame with 2 sheets of 15/32 plywood, this made a torsion box. I used lots of screws spaced approximately ever 4 inches. This made for strong ridgid base. Next I attached 4 inch locking casters. I've become a bit of caster connisseur as of late and find these from Home Depot to be some of the best on the market. They're economical and high functioning. With a strong foundation I built the carcass from 2x4s using Kreg pocket holes for the joinery. Drawers made of 1/2 A/C plywood and Kreg pocket holes. The cart is 29 inches wide but I only made the drawers 24 inches deep. This made some "dead space" which I later made into cubbies. I attached the top particle board to the carcass using 2x2 pine boards and Kreg holes. The top is edge banded with Red Oak. I'm still learning how to make good clean miter cuts... Luckily most of this was covered with laminate White Oak drawer faces finished with Cherry colored stain and poly finish I finished the ends with pegboard for some additional storage. All and all it came out pretty well and the customer loves it. But one thing is bothering me. At some point late in the build I discovered that the cart has a slight sag in the middle. I put a straight edge on the top and discovered about 3/32 or so of sag in the top and maybe 1/8 inch sag at the torsion box. This really bummed me out, I thought for sure the torsion box was bullet proof. Maybe I should have used six casters instead of four? I could go back and install a couple more casters. Or even easier I could install some shims between the counter top and the carcass, but I don't know... I kinda feel like now that it's all put together that it's not gonna sag much more and I'm obsessing; I've been accused of being a perfectionist in the past.... But I just don't know. What do you guys think? For future builds I'll bite the bullet and use full sized 2x4s instead of the 2x3s. Or maybe I'll use six casters.... Thanks for reading. Rich
  12. I found some answers here https://www.woodtalkonline.com/topic/19766-accelerating-polyurethane-dry-time/
  13. Hey All, I've got a project slated for deliver tomorrow and the finish isn't quite ready. I'm using General Finishes Gel Topcoat Eurothane. I applied the first coat yesterday around 3p.m., I checked it at 8a.m. this morning and it's still quite tacky. The directions say 12-24 hour dry time... It got quite chilly last night in the garage, around 40F. So I'm in a bit of a pickle I still need to apply a minimum of a second coat but it needs to be ready for delivery by tomorrow. Is there anything I can do to speed the dry time? My first thoughts are to get the boards, 4 drawer faces, in our warm furnace room after the next coat. Wait a couple hours and ad a fan. Any other suggestions are appreciated. Thanks! Rich
  14. OK, you guys talked me out of it, sort of... I already ordered a sheet of the microdots but I'm gonna keep it and use for that outfeed table for the tablesaw I've been wanting to make. As for my miter station, I already have it built with a 2x4 frame and 3/4 MDF in the horizontal surfaces. I've seen some shops leave at it that and I could do that too but... I've become a huge fan of laminate surfaces since I built an assembly table with laminate last summer. Since then I've been pretty abusive to it and it's held up extremely well. Dried up wood glue, spray paint, brake cleaner, acetone, rubbing alcohol, coffee, salsa... Whatever I throw at it it bounces back and says give me some more! Sometimes I'll forego putting down craft paper when I'm gluing, painting, staining or whatever because I can clean it up in seconds with a nice and sharp, wide chisel. So I've decided to still laminate the miter station but with a matte finish. This will provide the durability I'm after and give a little more grip. If I find that setup to be too slippery I'll tape a piece of sand paper to the deck of the saw itself. Thanks for your input everyone! Stay tuned.
  15. Hey All, Dad and I were turning some Red Oak logs into lumber with our Wood Miezer the other day and had a disagreement about how to cut it. We currently have a bunch of 4/4 Red Oak so I wanted to cut some 6/4 and 8/4 boards to have on hand. He didn't like that idea saying "nobody is gonna want that, there's no market for it" so we compromised and cut most of it to 6/4. I'm gonna personally make a floor lamp out of some of it but I'm curious to know what kind of stuff you could build with 6/4 and 8/4 Red Oak. Trestle table comes to mind. Puttin the feelers out. Rich