Nickhxc4life

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About Nickhxc4life

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  1. Yes hindsight I would have made the joints a lot tighter but due to how it needed to move to be assembled I couldn’t make them but so tight.
  2. I think the hole is fine. It’s a 3/8 hex bolt. I just wasn’t anticipating the stress that would be on the base side. I’m going to try the suggestion of making plywood backs for the two bottom joints. Those seem to be the only joints that had an issue with the stress. Also will try assembling the the bottom half and then setting the top half in place. A lot of things I could do differently but this was a down and dirty project.
  3. Ok so I figured there would be some trial and error with this so I started early. Basic construction was (2) 2x4s screwed and glued together with half laps to connect each side. I used tee nuts on one side so I could bolt it from the back which isn’t going to be visible in the pictures. I then built what I’m going to call “cases” these cases wrap around the 2x4 sides and look a lot nicer. Everything went well with final assembly. We stood it up and it stood on its own. The problem came when my wife and I went to lay it back down for disassembly. Just before we could get it to the ground we heard a loud snap. The bottom part where the legs attach snapped right where the bolt goes through the half lap. See pictures attached. Thoughts on what I could do differently?
  4. Half Laos would be super easy. I just wonder about the rigidity of the assembly if I got with half-laps in lieu of bridle joints. Maybe I could find some decorative bolts to use with the half lap instead of dowels
  5. If I do bridle what’s the best way to notch out the inner piece?
  6. Ok, so picture below will be the rough style I am going for. My wife will be using this for her styled photo shoots so She needs to be able to tear it down an reassemble without too much work or frustration. I’m also trying to keep any bolts etc as concealed as possible, especially from the front view. Open to all ideas. Shoot ‘em at me.
  7. Hey all, I bought my wife an autographed Joe Montana jersey for Christmas and I'd like to make the frame for it myself. Has anyone built this kind of frame before? Lookin for ideas. Thanks
  8. Thanks for the replies guys. I know it can be done as it’s been talked about a lot I just can’t wrao my head around how to hid the kerf. I haven’t modeled it yet but it will be a long sweeping curve. Wider stock cut curved will not get the job done.
  9. I may have misspoke....the rounded side of the deck won’t have rim joists it will have a fascia board more or less but you get the idea. If I butt the deck boards against it the kerf cuts will be exposed.
  10. Not sure if this belongs here but here it goes. I plan to build a floating deck this summer. There is a portion of it which will be rounded. In order to make it rounded, I will need to kerf cut the rim joist for the rounded section. How do I hide the kerf cuts in the rim joist without overlapping it with the deck boards?
  11. The only problem with extend the bump out to the front of the cabinets is that the left side of the fire place is already wider than the right (bump out side). Right now they’re about 7 inches difference in width. If I extend the bumpout they will be even further off.
  12. The upper part is fixed shelving. No doors so youd see it above the cabinet. I’m not worried about notching the bottom cabinet
  13. I hope I’m posting this in the right spot. I’m currently working on designing some built-ins for surrounding our downstairs fireplace. The lower cabinets will be 24” deep with maple plywood sides, back and top with solid maple doors and solid maple faceframe. The upper sections will be fixed shelving 12” deep. Sides will be maple plywood and it too will have solid maple wood trim to mimic the lower faceframe. My question is, how would you guys work around the bumpout shown in my picture? It is about 3” out from the wall and 4 1/2” deep. I’m not worried about the lower cabinets as it will be concealed within the cabinet but for the uppers can anyone think of a creative way to not make it so obvious? There will be built-ins on both sides for the fireplace so I’d like to make them as symmetrical as possible. My first thought would be to make the putter “faceframe” for the uppers 3 1/2 thick and call it a day but that adds a good bit of hardwood to both sides. Need options thanks for any input in advance
  14. And what is wrong with bench top options? This is a hobby. I don’t make things to sell at this point. I make things for fun.
  15. By no decent advice I meant that I didn’t ask people to reply with a lengthy post about how my budget is too low or how tools in that price range aren’t worth. I’d rather those people not post at all....not that complicated to understand.