Leaseman

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About Leaseman

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  • Woodworking Interests
    Making furniture. Learning Helping others when I can.

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  1. Running with Isaac's idea (and input from others). I think I have figured this out. Basically I drilled doweling holes in the stretchers first, then cut the angle to accommodate the leg. Here were the steps using scrap wood to test. Here is the test stretcher. The angled lined at the left shows where the board will be cut to fit against the leg. The line on the right shows how deep the dowel hole will go. Notice how much would I'm cutting on the left. That will be my "doweling jig" for the leg. Below shows the stretcher after the cut. Again notice the "waste" piece on the left that will become the jig. Holes have been drilled in the stretcher. I've placed the top dowel in and laid it over the "leg" to illustrate the angle. I then clamp the jig made from the waste cut above to drill my angled holes the the leg. Final assembly. Yes it's crooked but this test shows that it works. Pretty cool.
  2. I don't have drill press. Any other way of doing it?
  3. Good idea. How do you then, drill the corresponding holes at the proper angle on the legs?
  4. Sorry Byrdie but I can't visualize what your talking about. Are you suggesting to create an angled tenon that would go into the leg at a straight perpendicular direction? Perhaps I should change my approach and ask what is the best way to attach a stretcher to a leg at an angle in the same design I show above.
  5. It sounds like I have to practice my chiseling skills. I don't have a lot of experience with this type of work. I was hoping there was a way I could do this with my router in the same way I would cut the notch without the angle. I believe this comes down to designing a jig to hold the piece at the correct angle. The ones I test just weren't stable enough.
  6. Correct it's where the stretchers meet the legs, how to cut those notches
  7. I'm want to build a coffee table whose legs will be joined together with two boards that will cris cross (to form an "X"). I plan on creating a notch at the top of each leg that will receive the boards. Illustrated in the second picture. For the life of me and can't figure out how to create these notches. So at the risk of embarrassment I'm coming to you fine folks for input. The legs will be about 3" square. the cross members will be about 1 1/2" wide. Below I have drawn out how I envision doing this. Figure "A" is from the top of the leg looking down. You can see the notch will be about 1 1/2" wide, roughly 2 1/2" deep into the leg. The notch will not go all the way through the leg. Figure "B" shows this from the side of the leg. I forgot to draw it but the notch will do about 3" deep downward into the leg. I have played around with using my router table, doable perhaps but requires several pass's due to the thickness of the cris cross boards.Another problem I was having using the router table was getting the leg stable. I had to shim up one side to get the angle, I also created stop "blocks" to attempt to hold it into place but it still squirmed about a bit. Anyone have a better idea on how to do this? It seems like such a basic woodworking issue but I just can't figure it out.
  8. Leaseman

    Brad Nailer Issues

    Yes, your incident about illustrates that! Thanks for the advice.
  9. Leaseman

    Brad Nailer Issues

    I think you guys have solved the issue. The point of the nail determines which direction it curves out to. By angling the direction accordingly I can prevent this from happening. Also, I'm realizing that I'm using nails that are too long for the job. By using shorter brad nails and "shooting" them at the proper angle I can prevent this from happening. Thanks for all your input. Takes a village . . .
  10. Leaseman

    Brad Nailer Issues

    I don't use them much but many times when I use my brad nailer the nail curves off to the side for no apparent reason. The below picture is an example. The wood is Douglas Fir with no know knots or other "obstacles. Any ideas?
  11. Has anyone figured out a way to attach the Festool router to a Kreg benchtop router table using the "pins" that come with the Festool router? It's more convenient then screwing the plate to the table which is important when you only have one router like I do. There used to be a video on Youtube about this but I can't find it. Any suggestions?
  12. Leaseman

    Avoiding Tear Out While Routing Curves

    I was going to use a 1/2" round over bit. After hearing your advice what I might do is start with a 1/4" bit first and then do a second pass with the 1/2". Sort of a controlled "small bits" approach. Does this sound like a good idea?
  13. I'm rounding the edges on some table legs and have potential tear out problem. This is my first time making curved pieces and I'm coming to realize it presents some tear out issues that I've not faced before. Routing from "A" down (going down the curve) shouldn't be a problem assuming the direction of the router bit is going it's proper direction. But what about going "up" the curve going toward "B"? As you can see the grain direction, this could cause major tear out. Any recommendations on how to approach this.
  14. Leaseman

    Strongly Considering Domino Purchase

    Now that I think about it, your absolutely right. The rounded ends of a tenon won't add any strength anyway making the sizing of tenons easier. Why didn't I think of that.
  15. I like to work with various types of pine when building coffee tables, dressers, and other furniture. I just like the look of it. One of the problems with pine, as you know, is that because of it's soft nature it scratches and dents easily. I've never used Minwax wood hardener but does any one know if it would work well to harden pine to make it "tougher"? The product description suggest it's use on rotted wood, etc not really a finisher of wood. Anyone have any experience with this or have any other ideas to toughen up pine to make it more resistant?