applejackson

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Everything posted by applejackson

  1. applejackson

    Micro bevel on chisels?

    Imo it's all about repeatability. If you can easily recreate your sharpening set up to hit that micro bevel to touch it up, then go for it. I have a micro bevel on my chisels but not on most of my plane irons. Don't know why that is exactly, it just turned out that way.
  2. applejackson

    Okay, what's the next buy?!

    @Cody Bond ArellanollaArellanollaArellanollaArell Sorry about the weird text above. My phone keeps auto inserting it when I try to delete it? Weirdest behavior I've ever seen. Anyway, if you want a suggestion for a great jig saw at a decent price, check out the Triton at Rockler. I don't have experience using it but it's very popular and the design is really ergonomic. https://www.rockler.com/triton-tjs001-65a-orbital-action-jig-saw
  3. applejackson

    Table Saw! Powermatic vs. SawStop vs. your favorite!

    I rarely buy full sheets of anything any more because I don't have a truck. Rockler and most big box stores sell smaller sheets - 1/2, or 1/4 and those are way easier for me to deal with. At Rockler we also sell Baltic Birch in a sheet that's something close to 5'x3' and that's PERFECT. it's large enough to make a larger project out of but small enough to fit in my small SUV.
  4. applejackson

    Looking for my first router need advice

    I believe it first hit the market in 2010 in very limited supply. All I know is what I am told at the store I work at that sells both packages and t hat was is what I was told - that it's the replacement for the 1617 EVSpk.
  5. applejackson

    Looking for my first router need advice

    Both the routers you have listed are excellent choices. Here are a few things to keep in mind: 1. Porter Cable has easily the most aftermarket accessories available. 2. If you go with the Bosch, know that in order to use the PC style rub collars, you will need this: https://www.rockler.com/bosch-ra1129-quick-change-template-guide-adapter-kit - or you can buy that item with a number of Bosch rub collars. 3. The Bosch 1617 EVS kit has been replaced in the Bosch line with the far spendier MRC23EVSK. I have not had any experience using this new one, but I don't see enough changes in it to warrant the uptick in price, but maybe there are features I am not aware of. The power is virtually the same. This also means that you can usually get the 1617 EVS pk for a great price as stores sell off their existing inventory. I have the 1617 EVS pk and I really like it.
  6. applejackson

    Table Saw! Powermatic vs. SawStop vs. your favorite!

    Agreed. I went 36" because it seems to me I'd only ever use the 52" for cutting a full sheet of plywood exactly in half. And that's not something I do very often.
  7. applejackson

    Table Saw! Powermatic vs. SawStop vs. your favorite!

    I just got a 3HP SawStop PCS and so far I love it. But here is the one thing that I didnt see coming right away - the safety feature is a blessing and a curse. On my 2nd day after assembling the saw, I picked up a piece of plywood and ran it through. It had wicked up some moisture, apparently, because in a fraction of a second, I was out 1 blade and 1 cartridge (the safety system fired). Now I am a little more careful to evaluate the pieces I put through it. Aside from that I have nothing but positives to say about. Very well made, nice machine.
  8. applejackson

    How could i flatten my table top?

    Perfect opportunity to get your feet wet with hand planes. I'd suggest starting with a jointer plane, or a low angle Jack plane. Make sure the blade is razor sharp. Even with very little planning experience, you can do this!
  9. applejackson

    Where can i learn about wood working hands on?

    Another good resource for education is Half Price Books. You can find good books there, often around the $5-7 range. YouTube is great and all but experience is the best teacher. Start with smaller and simple projects that you're confident you can compete with the tools you have on hand. And remember that the joy is BOTH in completing a project, but also the path along the way. These forums are a wealth of information too. Best of luck! And welcome to the craft!
  10. applejackson

    Shop Tour

    Thank you for sharing, @Kev. It's always fun and inspiring to see another Woodworker's shop. And you are well apportioned in what I've come to learn is one of the greatest, and hardest to come by commodities in a shop: space. After seeing all the abundant space between your machines and work stations, my 2.5 car garage/shop seems all the more cramped. Enjoy your new space, I am sure you'll do great work in there!
  11. applejackson

    So this happened today... New SawStop.

    Yep it's just a glossy finish and night stamped steel. The contractor saw has stamped wings on it, though they have the name or logo worked in. No there isn't an arbor lock. It's still a two wrench procedure to change the blade. The wenches are identical, each has one open end and one closed, but yeah it's not as nice or convenient as a push button lock.
  12. applejackson

    So this happened today... New SawStop.

    @gee-dub - I have seen this criticism from you and several others - that the extension table is not 100% perfectly co-planer with the cast iron table. It got me worried that I was going to have to move heaven and earth to get it aligned properly on my new SS. And then something occurred to me - and I ask this with the utmost respect, and I am honestly wondering: How much does it really matter if the extension table is a few 1/1000" higher or lower than the cast iron table? Obviously, I am not talking about it being so far out of whack that it is immediately noticeable to the naked eye, or so bad that it affects or impedes the fence's ability to slide back and forth, or having a noticeable amount of sag. Instead, I am talking about trying to get it dialed in as perfectly as you would expect to get the cast iron wing to be co-planer to the cast iron table for example. Does the extension table really need to be as accurate and have as little margin for error as the fence-to-miter-slot or miter-slot-to-blade? For those, I would surmise that the answer is YES, that a few thousandths of an inch in either direction really DO matter and can have significant impact on your cut quality. But when I think about the extension table, it doesn't seem to me like it needs to be dialed in nearly as perfectly - I guess mainly because the work piece is resting on the cast iron for the most part. Am I nuts here? thx... PS I am also going to tag @Chestnut here for his opinion. I appreciate everyone in this forum, but you are the two that I have interacted with the most and I value your opinions greatly. Cheers.
  13. applejackson

    Do you need your tools to "match"?

    @Isaac I appreciate your point of view and wasn't trying to snap at you. I just didnt get the carpenter reference I hope you didnt take it that way. Take care, my friend.
  14. applejackson

    Do you need your tools to "match"?

    @Isaac you lost me. Not sure where i implied that I, or most of the ppl in this forum, are more into carpentry then hobbiest/craft furniture making. Of course aesthetics play a role, but all I was saying is that in my shop, aesthetics have nothing to do with ensuring that all of the tools come from the same company. But to each their own. There's nothing wrong with it - it is just not something that I am concerned about at all. Take care, sir.
  15. applejackson

    Do you need your tools to "match"?

    Any matching in my shop is coincidental. Not only am I a non-matcher, I am somewhat bothered by the concept. (Or, at least I was before reading this thread). In my mind, tools are utilitarian. They are there to serve a purpose. Worrying about whether or not the match doesn't even get on the radar of things I am concerned with. Matching is what my wife does with the towels and floor mats in the bathrooms. So at least in theory, it makes no sense to me . Now, having seen a couple of guys explain why they are matchers below, I can at least begin to understand it a little but. And when it comes to battery-powered tools, it only makes sense to match so you can accumulate more batteries and swap them around as needed.
  16. applejackson

    So this happened today... New SawStop.

    @Robert Morse well now I've got a rather large case of shop envy, so thanks a lot! That is one fine looking shop you've got there!
  17. applejackson

    So this happened today... New SawStop.

    +1 to that. The biggest difference that I can tell in the ICS base over the PCS is that the ICS allows you to move it any direction easily, where I think the PCS mainly allows back and forth, but side to side movement is more difficult.
  18. applejackson

    Boeshield RustFree

    @gee-dub Could be environmental, could be mechanical. I've never opened a can up but I assume there's a straw that draws the fluid up to the nozzle. If that straw falls off, it could render the can useless. That's my best guess anyway. (And not to be a killjoy but that pic of the overturned deck chair started out as an example of the horrible damage caused by Hurricane Rita in Texas and has been around for a long time. Still funny though!)
  19. applejackson

    Boeshield RustFree

    Same thing happened to me in an unused, new can. I got 2-3 sprays and then... Nothing.
  20. applejackson

    Sawstop folding outfeed table

    I need to post the resolution to the above-listed issue. I was able to resolve the issue. I dont know exactly which adjustment did it, but I took the outfeed table off the saw, and played around with the clamps that fasten it to the rear rail. I also took the faces off of the fence and adjust them. In the end, I did have to remove the plastic caps from the tubes that make the OF table, but I WAS able to get it seated below the plane of the able and am now able to use the saw without the outfeed table set up. Sawstop DID call me and worked with me on the issue. When I wrote the post above this one, I was not happy with their response. After they contacted me and worked with me on this problem, I a now can say that i AM pleased with their service.
  21. applejackson

    So this happened today... New SawStop.

    @Robert Morse regarding your missing part, are you assembling in the order described in the manual or are you skipping around? I ask this because when I strayed from the steps in the manual, I thought I was missing a part too (can't remember which one specifically) only to find it later, packed in with some other parts). So there might be chance that your missing part is in there somewhere. And no offense meant. You night have unpacked everything and it really is missing. Definitely possible!
  22. After my first accidental SawStop brake activation - I thought it might be worthwhile to start a thread where forum members can list the causes of accidental SS brake activation - thereby preventing costly and unintentional activation. As I was setting up my new SawStop cabinet saw, I couldn't help but wonder how long it would take before I activated the brake for the first time - either by contacting the blade with a finger, or a different cause. I arrogantly thought that it would be a long time. It took 2 days. CAUSE: Moisture wicked into plywood. I had some plywood stored on 2 stickers to keep it off the floor in my detached garage. Well, despite it being stored off of the concrete, some moisture had wicked up into the workpiece. It was not damp to to the touch at all. There was some discoloration and that was my only clue that it held some water. In reading the manual, it suggests very firmly that a workpiece would have to contain significant moisture to activate the brake. Since there was nothing to suggest that this piece held significant moisture I proceeded with a cut and bam! The brake fired and my brand new SawStop combination blade, and brake cartridge were destroyed. While I am chalking this up to a learning curve, I can't help but feel like SS is a little bit accountable here as I was following the manual closely and there was nothing to suggest that I should run it through in bypass mode to determine if the workpiece held enough moisture to trip the brake. In the future, I will be MUCH more likely to test a piece first if I determine there is any possibility of moisture beyond the typical moisture content of kiln-dried hardwoods. If you have accidentally activated a brake firing from something that you didn't see coming I would love to know about it. I did not see this one coming - but then again it is a brand machine and a brand new safety system that I have zero feel for. Live and learn.
  23. applejackson

    So this happened today... New SawStop.

    @Chestnut I am no engineer, but I will take a shot at explaining it the best I can. The aluminum cartridge clamps onto the blade. The force of the spinning blade gets absorbed by the cartridge mainly in the area circled in red. The cartridge mounts on steel studs in the machine. I am sure there is some of the force that goes into the machine, but I believe that the vast majority of it goes into the cartridge. Here is a video that shows it in slo mo:
  24. applejackson

    So this happened today... New SawStop.

    @Isaac +1 to @gee-dub. We did a hotdog demo in the store and then when my own saw tripped the brake, both times there's simply a pop and that's it. I've heard from ppl who have a SS in a school or work environment where the brake has been tripped multiple times and it's just fine. All the force is absorbed by the cartridge. It doesn't appear to have any negative effect on the rest of the saw at all.
  25. applejackson

    SawStop inadvertent brake activation causes

    @Bankstick, @mat60 After my inadvertent brake triggering, I was understandably upset. It ruined s brand new blade and I had to replace a $80 cartridge. But having said that, I do not regret the purchase one bit. The fit and finish on the saw are simply excellent. It's by far the nicest tool I've ever owned. As with any technology that's brands new, there are going to be things that happen that we didn't see coming. And even without the flesh sensing feature, there is always a period of getting to know a new machine -especially when that machine is the center of the shop. I hope this thread doesn't discourage anyone from purchasing a Sawstop. I am a few weeks into ownership now and am getting more comfortable every day. I've accepted that I have to be more deliberate in evaluating what I'm about to cut for moisture or imbedded metal. That's new. But if there's any doubt I simply run the piece through on bypass mode and they tells me if I need to keep it in BM or not. I've taken the cheap replacement blade off and resumed using my "good" blades.