Chip Sawdust

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Everything posted by Chip Sawdust

  1. While I really like the Greene and Greene look, and have now made several pieces in that style, I'm now quite intrigued by the Federal style of fourniture, with its stringing and inlays. While I think inlays are somewhat beyond my dexterity level, I think stringing and Fluting are right in my wheel well, so to speak. To that end, I started researching tools panda methods to accomplish this. Steve Latta is the renowned expert in the world of these things, and there are many others. Latta has gone in with Lie-Nielson and has a beautiful set of tools available for the better part of $400. As a beginner, hobbyist, where there's no money to be made I hesitate to spend that much on a lark. However, Lee Valley sells Fluting blades and you can get eight or so for $30, and LN sells stringing sizing blades, a set of two for $15 (possibly the cheapest thing on their site). So I bought a set of each from each vendor, and proceeded to make my own holders. Garrett Hack has some videos and articles in FWW about stringing, so I made one of his tools, and another article by an ther out for has a different holder, so I made some of those as well. Anyone who has experience in this area I'd be glad to know a few things. I see holly used as stringing, but I have easy access to maple so plan to use that. Any problems there? Pitfalls? I've searched this site but found not much about the actual making and use of stringing. So here's my spot where I'll out a few things.
  2. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    And speaking of beading, using scratch stock o ran a bead around the tops of my end table project tables. The end grain is a bugger, but it cleaned up ok. Then I’ll put a rounded taper underneath with the router table. It’s fun using these beading tools. A friend said it didn’t look like fun, but I thoroughly enjoyed it.
  3. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    Busy looking bench at this stage of the game. If I had a shop twice the size — I’d fill it up with other stuff! Lol
  4. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    So I started my first pack of banding tonight. Tomorrow I’ll unclamp it and see what it looks like. One layer each of holly, then anigre on the outside, two layers of sapele. Should look good on these African mahogany legs, I’m thinking.
  5. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    You can see the exacto blade is barely visible. While this worked, I eventually tapped it down farther. This is why, with this thin a blade, I think a bar with screwed-down tension will be better. Edit: screwed down vs. wedged like this thing is. The wedge holds the blade in place; it should have mechanical tension in the form of screws or some such.
  6. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    I replaced the marking gauge cutter with an exacto blade as the marking gauge blade “wasn’t cutting it” so to say. This setup worked well, but I think a dedicated cutter is in the future. the dang picture won’t upload. Oh well. I also made a dedicated string cutting board with a tiny lip for a fence, to hold the wood against. It’s far better than the straightedge with sandpaper backing on it. I’ll try that pic again...
  7. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    So for the dremel base fence rather than pay StewMac $X for it, i made a little fence of oak. A couple slots for adjustment and beveled a little relief for sawdust.
  8. Chip Sawdust

    Another Broken Bandsaw Blade

    I’ve had good luck with the 5/8” Laguna blade in my 1412 but can’t imagine what would be causing you to go through blades. A puzzler and irritation for sure. I’ve used 1/4 to 3/4 Timberwolf blades too with no problems, from small curves to resawing small logs. (Insert shrug emoji here)
  9. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    I’m having trouble loading pics from my phone but will revisit this later.
  10. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    I cut grooves with my radius tool and straight lines with a dremel and a 3/64” bit. Drag the strips through the sizing jig/die until you’re happy with the fit. Add glue (I used a syringe) and press the stringing into the grooves, trimming with a chisel or exacto as required.
  11. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    So I’m making these end table for my wife, and while she didn’t order it, I’m adding stringing to them. First are the legs, for which I opted to use African mahogany. This is a tricky wood to work with as its grain is really hard to read. It’s also full of stringy, relatively loose fibers. I much prefer oak or sapele! Anyway, here are a few pics of the progress... First, make a zero clearance insert for a circular saw blade; it has a 1/16” kerf to save material. Then put sandpaper on a straight edge and slice a strip with a utility knife.
  12. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    Hey Mark, anigre is a species that takes dye well. Holly and satinwood do too, but they’re cost prohibitive. I bought a piece of holly recently, had to be an online purchase, and for a 3’ board it was $70. Good thing I’m not using it for structure!
  13. Chip Sawdust

    Mortiser Bits

    Just bought a PM mortiser, and it’s a great machine. I was too cheap to spring for the $180 PM bit set, however. I went to Lee Valley instead and bought their mid-range set for around $65. While I was waiting for those to show up, the machine arrived! Well, one can’t have a new machine sitting there and no bits to try it out so I went to a local power tool shop and bought a 3/8” Shop Fox bit (they had PM bits but one was $50+ and the SF was $16). Now, I don’t expect as much from a $16 but as a $50 bit, but I took the Shop Fox bit home and followed the tune-up advice in a video on FWW. It require a lot of filing internally as well as honing. It worked and I was happy. in come the Lee Valley bits. First impression, the machining was a lot better than the SF bit. The chisel and bore were both much cleaner looking and I had no need to do anything internally to the LV bits, any of the four. A point for the SF bit is it required installation of the larger chisel holder. In the world of machines, I think bigger is beefier and better. So yay! Even though the stress on this past is mostly vertical compression, I like the bigger diameter of the chisel mount. But overall I have to give the nod to the LV chisels for overall smoothness of machining and design. Some may prefer the flute design of the SF but they both seem to work. The Shop Fox bit is on the left in the picture below, and in fact all the following pictures. I invite opinions and comments to educate me on these things as this is my first mortiser and I know there are things I don’t know.
  14. Chip Sawdust

    What to watch for when buying a used bandsaw

    Let us know how it turns out! Exciting to get a “real” bandsaw in the shop
  15. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    Thanks guys I have more ideas and methods to try so I hope it you’re patient with me as I fumble through this. I ordered some holly for its totally white properties and plan to use some on my wife’s end tables she ordered up. Those are made of sapele so the lighters stringing will be better. I have some really unique plans for banding as well; stay tuned!
  16. Chip Sawdust

    Veneer Adventures

    Chestnut, what would we ever do without blue tape? This is looking good, you’re a quick study
  17. Today my wife reminded me that making our G&G bed frame took over a year *shrug* but she still asks for more stuff I’ll be interested to kibbitz on this project as well, so let’s get some sawdust flying! Haha
  18. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    I cut a plug out of alder and just cross-grained the installation for the visual effect. Started trimming the high spots on the strings with the bevel down on a chisel, then went to my scraper (which I need to sharpen), then finished with my small block plane. I think it turned out well for my first attempt at this new avenue (for me) in woodworking.
  19. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    Bought some black anigre online, pretty good price for three pieces that’ll last me ages... and that’s what I wanted to lay into the alder, rather than maple which has little contrast. Cut some stringing, finally cut my straight grooves with my new cutter tool, and started setting it all in place.
  20. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    So I made some progress after getting a few more things lined up... I bought these blades for LN and although the trimmer set was back ordered for over three weeks I finally got the set. Got the cutter blade as well for straight grooves. Made a couple tools out of them...
  21. Chip Sawdust

    Popular Woodworking

    Uh oh....
  22. Chip Sawdust

    Hand tool cabinet in maple

    Sappelle with maple gives me ideas for the end tables I’m preparing to build. I look forward to seeing your progress on this,
  23. Chip Sawdust

    Popular Woodworking

    I subscribed to PW last year but like others I find its utility limited for me. Doubt I’ll renew. I did receive my print issue recently I get FWW (best in the business imho) and Wood. Wood is ok but if I had to choose only one I’d drop it and keep FWW. Taunton also sells superior quality books and plans. I’ve bought several.
  24. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    Here’s some string installed. Maple in alder, not much contrast.
  25. Chip Sawdust

    Stringing, Fluting, Beading and such

    I don’t know much either Tom, I’m just watching (mostly) Latta’s videos and trying stuff out. This is all practice for the time being. But since I’m cheap, I tried to make my own straight line cutter using my marking gauge. Ummmm.... I need to work on that. It’s tough to do at home without a fixture and not really knowing how to do it. I’m open for suggestiOne from machinists! Here’s what I came up with for a cutting blade using a piece of old kitchen knife, a Dremel and a triangle file. It did make a groove, but it’s not there yet.