xlur8ed

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    Just getting my feet wet.
  1. Well ladies and gents... For the future greenhorn that may come across this thread, I think all of the advice was extremely helpful in tackling this monster. In the end, it was really really easy at slower speeds with a fence. I believe the biggest of my many issues had to do with speed. At 800rpms, I am comfortably positioned, cleanly shaving wood and the hole is perfect. It's a small victory for this fellow. I just assembled the gate piece and it is perfect. Feels fantastic and I can only imagine how it will feel when you near the end of a month/year long build. Appreciate all the advice, thank you all! I'll keep reading, learning and commenting as necessary in hopes of someday being able to contribute quality advice to a newcomer! Cheers!
  2. Thanks for the reply. The table I got has a T Track in the fence and comes with a ~3" x 3" block of wood to use as a stop. I hope that helps solve my issue. I also realized last night as I was watching YouTube videos of my drill press, that I had another stupid rookie mistake in my first go. I didnt tighten the drill press table in place after raising it to the proper position. I just thought it wobbled cause it was cheap and not good quality. Cranked that down last night and it took away all the wobble....which was another potential cause for my issues. Sigh. I didn't grow up with a dad that used tools, so it's going to be school of hard knocks for awhile... hopefully I'm smart enough to prevent an ER visit or loss of a finger! Ha! One follow up question to you mentioning you "always clamp your work for larger bits"...could you define "larger bits"? Thanks again guys and gals!
  3. I got lost in the first replies, and never got a chance to personally thank you for your help! Thank you! Sounds like you are well familiar with Fargo. I used to work for a home builder (a clipboard holder, not a laborer...if you could devise that from my multiple posts) and we used Dakota Timber on a few reclaimed walls. Small world In regards to your latest post, I can greatly appreciate what you are saying. A failure to my being is always trying to be 2-200 steps ahead of myself. It leads to be prepared in a business sense for forecasting (as a profession), but leads to time, expense and injury in hobby arenas. It's supposed to be fun, not a chore. I struggle with getting that part of it down. And the auger bit in the drill press is absolutely comedy as I think about it. I appreciate the politeness in your statement, but what you are suggesting is pretty simple. The threaded start to the bit doesn't just pull up and out with ease. I almost wonder if you didn't solve my issue right there. As I tried to hold the wood in my hand, on a loose table, drilling with an auger bit and getting down a little bit and as I try to lift up, it wasn't to grab the wood and rip it out of my hands. Well duh hahahaha. It's threaded in! My Lord maybe I should just sell my tools and stick to something I'm naturally good at. My 2 left thumbs has haunted me my whole life. I just hope I keep both of them before a table saw takes one off. (Ok I'm overselling myself a little for humor, but I am pretty green and unafraid to jump into something...things I try to teach employees I manage to avoid) Thanks again for your time and VERY helpful responses! Spindle speed down as low as it can go has been ingrained into my soul. The curiousity in me has to ask... What is the purpose of having a drill press that can go 3000-10000 whatever RPMS? Is that more metal work? High speed and lubrication? Or harder the wood, higher the RPM (while following directions on the bit for max unloaded RPM)? Maybe a longer discussion than a simple answer... Great advice on the spade bit, I understand what you're saying completely. Thanks again all for the help. I'm off for the weekend to go help my dad tear off some hearty board siding from his house/garage... Hopefully my 2 left thumbs don't fail me with the newly acquired wonder bar Cheers to the weekend!
  4. Fantastic advice, but rest assured taking the time to do it wasn't the issue, it literally is my lack of understanding of 'Drill Press 101' and unknowing if a clamp was good/bad/dangerous/helpful/necessity. I'm learning by the hour, and that's pretty fun. I hope to get into more challenging projects down the road, but as mentioned above starting with cheap 2x4s/pine was about the only thing I've gotten right for this first project with real hope of an acceptable piece in our home. If nothing else, something I can look back on in 10 years and giggle thinking "remember when I didn't know you should tighten your drill press table down and I asked a forum how to drill a 1/2" hole down into pine 1.25" Haha
  5. Thanks for the reply. The table I got has a T Track in the fence and comes with a ~3" x 3" block of wood to use as a stop. I hope that helps solve my issue. I also realized last night as I was watching YouTube videos of my drill press, that I had another stupid rookie mistake in my first go. I didnt tighten the drill press table in place after raising it to the proper position. I just thought it wobbled cause it was cheap and not good quality. Cranked that down last night and it took away all the wobble....which was another potential cause for my issues. Sigh. I didn't grow up with a dad that used tools, so it's going to be school of hard knocks for awhile... hopefully I'm smart enough to prevent an ER visit or loss of a finger! Ha! One follow up question to you mentioning you "always clamp your work for larger bits"...could you define "larger bits"? Thanks again guys and gals!
  6. Thanks all! I did order a drill press table and fence prior to posting. Sounds like that, lower speeds, clamps and forstner bit SHOULD provide success. I look forward to going into it more confidently. In regards to an earlier question, the aluminum piping is 1/2" OD....so I'm hoping to get a sliver of play with the bit/pipe combo to help in alignment during assembly. That could be the next/last challenge, but I suspect I could just drill out the top boards to 5/8" being they will be unseen, and leave the bottom holes 1/2". Get everything put together, flip the kennel upside down and toss some glue down the 5/8" holes to secure the play in the pipes. At least that makes sense in my amateur brain. I really appreciate the time, energy and effort to help a rookie. Assets like y'all will help keep this hobby alive for the next generations! Cheers!
  7. Hello all, First time poster, name is Jason from Fargo, ND. I have been accumulating tools and woodworking equipment for a year or so, and finally started into my first real project. A nice dog kennel for inside the home. I'm using 'stud' quality 2x4's for everything besides the top and bottom (and vertical bars, of course). I used the straightest 2x4s I could get my hands on, but do not own a planer so I'm at the mercy of 'pretty straight'. I've already learned a lot (like don't sand/prime/paint the pieces before all holes are drilled), but have hit a frustrating brick wall with my cheap drill press. I have the 10" Wen Drill Press special from Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005UKGLAS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1) and everytime I try and drill the holes for the 1/2" aluminum pipes, the drill press/bit is grabbing the test chunk of wood and ripping it out of my hands. I started with an auger type 1/2" bit, and it would get 0.5" into the wood and grab it out of my hands and tweak itself in the wood and lock up the drill press. I was smart enough to try it on scrap wood just to get a feel for it so I didn't ruin my otherwise finished pieces...but I still had no success getting the bit down to the desired 1.25" down in the 2x4. Things I learned along the way: Speed for a drill press matters. The first 2 auger bits I tried were at speeds over 2800 and I let it run without any load...apparently per the packaging this is a rookie mistake and can warp the bit...which could potentially explain why I couldn't get the bit to go down very far before it grabs it and twisted it out of my hands. I made 3 trips for different bits (yes, 3) last Sunday, and in the end ended up with a Forstner bit at 5/8" (Home Depot was out of 1/2" so I figured the extra play would be ok...not realizing a 1/2" rod in a 5/8" hole is WAY too much play...but I DID learn by this 3rd bit to lower the speed down to 2400, and I was able to get the bit all the way down in the wood. I hope to tackle the last of this project this weekend but would greatly appreciate advice from those more experienced than myself. My research over the past few days has led me to buy the Wen Drill Press Table and Fence attachement, and some Irwin clamps. With all that build up, here is my question(s): Should I be clamping down the piece I'm drilling into? Is that something I should always do? I feel like the high tech drill presses back in high school 20 years ago didn't require anything but a firm grasp...but we also were using small regular drill bits, nothing resembling a forstner bit/auger bit.... I've desired to get into this hobby for most of my life, and although I decided to cheap out on the drill press, absolutely everything else in my shop is new leading brand 18v product (I'm smart enough to avoid stating the exact brand on the internet for risk of topic derailment). My other worry is the chuck or spindal in my cheap Wen drill press isn't straight. I feel like my success with the 5/8" bit drilling a perfect hole proves everything with the press is straight, but I honestly have no clue. Any help, guidance, mockery, humor is welcome. I'd just really like to avoid the bit grabbing one of my painted finished pieces and sending me back to the miter saw, sander, priming, painting station again and again. Thank you kindly and I'll attach a picture of my build plans.