Sanjuan_woodworks

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  • Woodworking Interests
    Furniture

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  1. Never have enough clamps. I get what your saying, furniture making and cabinetmaking, especially a lot of the millwork i do, like making doors and such really requires a different type of clamp. To be honest i haven't met many clamps i didn't like and when you're in the heat of the moment it seems like they all get used. That looks like a pretty awesome facility you use to work at, looks huge compared to the place i work.
  2. Yes those are the ones, I guess there not the gear klamp. I wonder if ours are just getting dirty and abuse by the shop heathens. They seem to work great for you.
  3. They look and operate just like that one, the ones in the shop at work are orange but no don't remember who makes them.
  4. How do you keep those bessey gear klamps from popping on you. I like how they work but whenever I use them, and tap the piece with a mallet or maybe knock it a bit, it pops out, very frustrating.
  5. Working in a cabinet shop most time I break edges with the orbital sander, it's just the fastest most convenient way, and Billy Jack is right if they painting of staining they want everything done the exact same way. Things like trim and moulding that will be installed and finished on-site by someone else, I usually just take a swipe with a sanding block. Large roundovers get done with a trim router followed up with a quick ROS sanding. On personal furniture items i usually break the edge by hand with the same grit i finish the rest with.
  6. so if you have the cnc, which will cover most of your sheet good processing needs, and you still need to process large amounts of solid lumber. I suggest two saws, your regular 5hp tablesaw, sawstop good choice for safety. But if you have a lot to process and maybe inexperience labor nothing beats a straight line rip saw. If you have three phase already in the building prolly find one relatively inexpensive on auction.