justaguy

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Everything posted by justaguy

  1. It is looking really good. I started on mine at the end of Sept, '21. Finally rounding the last turn
  2. I used Griot's polish. I used to have cars that I would polish once a year. Pour on, spread it out with your hand, then polish off. There are different grits to polish, just like sandpaper. I would go coarse, medium, and then fine. Each step removes the "scratches" from the previous step, replacing them with finer scratches. Wipe the residue after each step. A slightly damp cloth works well. I had a random orbital polisher. A fine mesh scotch brite pad under a random orbital sander would work just as well. Must be random orbital or you will end up with swirls.
  3. The only epoxy I had on my build was for the river itself. I sanded wood and epoxy to 220. I used my polisher with rubbing compound to get the epoxy surface smooth and clear
  4. you are going to like it. There is a learning curve
  5. Nice birthday gifts. I have a set of the Blue Spruce butt chisels and love them
  6. Yeah, I know. When I shop these days my first choice is Made in the USA, second choice is anybody but China. Sometimes there are no choices, which I find really sad
  7. So I ended up with the Milwaukee. Spoke with Jessem to get the correct mounting pattern for the 5625. They knew their old router had issues. The old router was built offshore - probably China. They are planning to start building their own routers, plan to be available in the fall. They had good things to say about the SpinRite. Got good reviews from their customers.
  8. That or the Bora is what I will probably end up with. When I first put this table together, I was choosing between the Jessem router and PC7518. The Jessem's remote variable speed control and RPM readout got my vote/$$. Wish I could get a PC now. Hindsight is wonderfull
  9. mine are also floating, but tacking them down with one pin or screw in the center of each end is typical. My table does not need help with ridgidity
  10. Not available for 4-6 weeks, and I am in the middle of a project. The Spine Rite specs sound good but is made in China. I could limp by with a hand held and edge guide, but prefer using the table.
  11. I have a Jessem router table with a MastRLift II. The Pow R Tek router died (again). It must have been a problematic piece for Jessem, as they no longer have it available. Need to get a variable speed 15 amp router to replace it. Recommendations? Any experience with the Bora unit?
  12. That is correct. One pin/screw in the center on each end. I built a small cabinet to sit on the shelf. like pkinneb, I haven't seen the shelf for quite a while
  13. can you shiplap the slats. Worked for me, YMMV
  14. I am sorry you have to go through this BS
  15. Northfield Band Saws (northfieldwoodworking.com) Yes they are. For grins, look at their non woodworking machines.
  16. Others have mentioned a vacuum to degas the epoxy. If you are careful with the mixing you should not need to. I did not do this, but understand the principle. Another source of bubbles of gas in the epoxy por is the wood itself. I coated/painted the edges of the river with a very thin coat of epoxy to seal the wood. Worked for me, YMMV
  17. At my wife's request/order I built this river table. I used this guy for inspiration/instruction. It was my first and I did not try smaller projects or test objects. Custom Woodworking, Tutorials, Epoxy Resin Workshops - Blacktail Studio. Very knowledgeable and easy to listen to. Can be found on You Tube. If you get to a point where you are not sure what to do, you can set up a video chat with him He has a calculator for determining the amount of epoxy you will need I used Chill epoxy - highly recommended. I did a three pours, and used 2 different epoxies because of depth of pour. A good seal around and under the table cannot be overstated. Had a friend who decided to do a table after seeing mine. Ended up filling the floor drain in his basement, as well as cementing the clothes dryer to the floor. I ended up with the woodpecker flattening jig after trying a homemade unit and a cheaper store-bought jig. As is typical of Woodpecker, expensive but it works. I did dictate the finish of the table. I really do not like the look or feel of an epoxy surface. I used one of Targets finishes. Since this was built at my wife's request, it was the perfect time to justify a Fuji system
  18. An example of going south. While living in WA, I got my Laguna HD 18 dropped off in my shop/detached garage while I was at work. Nice driver and great wife. Anyways, the saw was on top of two pallets, like yours. The angel on my left shoulder said wait until you have help. The devil on my right shoulder said you have waited long enough, get it down and setup. The devil won. I started walking the bandsaw off the double pallet stack when the upper pallet collapsed, which immediately transferred all the weight to me - which I was not ready for. I tried valiantly to stabilize things, but gravity was clearly winning. There was no way I was letting go of the bandsaw, and the next thing I knew I was laying on my back with the saw on top of me. First thing I did was take inventory of my body parts. Nothing was hurting terribly so I knew nothing was broken. Abdomen was not tender, so probably no internal bleeding. After the inventory of my body parts, I realized I might have a problem. The bandsaw, which weighed 550 lbs, had me pinned to the floor. The top of the saw was just under my chin level and covered my abdomen and all of my right leg, and most of my left leg. I tried getting out from under the saw, but no progress. Then I realized that my wife has strict instructions about leaving me alone in the shop, so there would be no one to come and check how things were going. After a short period of panic, I was able to to extract myself from under the bandsaw. Took inventory of the saw and found a couple of small things broken. I called Lagunas CS, told them exactly what had happened. When they stopped laughing, they sent out the parts free of charge. I inquired as to how they were able to do that, they said they had authorization to cover things damaged in shipment. After I stopped laughing, I thanked them. Got the saw up and running. Shortly after, it retaliated by trying to take part of my right thumb as I was doing something stupid. We have now been together for 3 years, and I love that saw.
  19. I get my hardware from screws | McMaster-Carr Not sure of country of origin
  20. I picked the planer (and 12" jointer) up when I was living in the Seattle area. There is a dealer there that had a deal with Powermatic/Jet to get any equipment that had been damaged in shipment to the USA. Equipment Sales and Surplus Damage was usually cosmetic, or broken handle, etc. They would fix them up and sell them for prices that were usually in the 1/3-1/2 off MSRP. Much cheaper than any other dealer I looked at, but unforntunately they do not ship, so pickup only. They would load your truck/trailer, but you had to have a way to unload yourself. Lead to some interesting gymnastics. Good deals if you live in the area. They don't have a steady supply, so for some things you would have to wait for it to show up.
  21. You nailed it Tom. It just has to not leak, it doesn't have to look good
  22. A while back, I made the decision to have 6" dust ports on most of my equipment in order to increase dust (not chip) collection. The first revision of this machine was to have the port come straight out, bit this resulted in the hose interfering with boards exiting the planer. So this is the second revision. Working well so far.