derekcohen

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derekcohen last won the day on April 8

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About derekcohen

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    Journeyman Poster

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  • Website URL
    www.inthewoodshop.com

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  • Location
    Perth, Australia
  • Woodworking Interests
    Building furniture predominantly with handtools

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  1. There is another way to do this: saw as close to the line as possible, and then clean up with a rasp and file. If you are dead set on a jig, then get rid of the aluminium and just use MDF or, better still, a hardwood. The teeth will remove a smidgeon from the lower edge of the hardwood jig, but from there on it will be fine. Regards from Perth Derek
  2. Using a diamond plate, remove the set from the saw. This may be easier with a Western saw than Japanese saw, which is impulse hardened. Regards from Perth Derek
  3. derekcohen

    New project, new tool?

    The easiest of all scrapers to use is the thick one I show in my link (above). Stewmac sell their version: https://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Types_of_Tools/Scrapers/StewMac_Ultimate_Scraper.html They also sell scraper blades and a burnisher: https://www.stewmac.com/SiteSearch/?search=scraper If you have a thick scraper, simply grind the corners away. Lost Art Press are selling a curved scraper which is designed not to need bending - easier on the fingers, and note that this is for chair seats. There are sanders and then there are Sanders. I use two that I will recommend: They are both by Mirka and use Abranet mesh. This aids is dust collection, as well as lasting a long time. Both are connected to a vacuum cleaner (I use a Festool CT26E). The first is a hand sander (yes, no power) ... The other is a Ceros - very light and nimble (replaced by the Deros now) .. Regards from Perth Derek
  4. derekcohen

    New project, new tool?

    Andrew, buying that “set” would be money poorly spent. The components are all good, but they are not all necessary, and it may be misleading to assume that all you need is this set and you will produce great results. What is missing is the skill/technique to prepare a cabinet scraper (which is the correct term for a card scraper). In a nutshell, you need a simple rectangle of steel, the card, and this is available for about $10 from many places (I like supporting LV, as they offer great service, but they are not the only game in town if you have other, closer, cheaper sources). This piece of steel is really basic, nothing special. Then you need to create a flat surface, and then turn a hook on the edge. Do you have a fine diamond stone (600/1200 grit) or sandpaper glued to glass? The hook needs a burnisher, not a screwdriver shaft. But you can use any smooth piece of hardened steel. I like carbide rods. Here is a pictorial on using these to sharpen: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/WoodworkTechniques/FoolproofSharpeningOfCard(Cabinet)Scraper.html Regards from Perth Derek
  5. derekcohen

    Hammer K3 - off switch modification

    I would like to see that, Mark. Have you a photo? I have a Nova as well, and the aspect I dislike is the electronic button's low sensitivity. Regards from Perth Derek
  6. derekcohen

    Hammer K3 - off switch modification

    Mark, it feels so solid at this stage, I will leave it while I get the feel. I do have plans to make a final version from aluminium (to replace the wood) and red perspex. That will be riveted together and then riveted or screwed to the chassis. Regards from Perth Derek
  7. derekcohen

    Making an 80 deg bevel cut on TS

    Or ... mark the lines you want, and either handsaw or hand plane it away. A bandsaw would also do this easily. A crosscut jig on a tablesaw might work. Regards from Perth Derek
  8. derekcohen

    Hammer K3 - router table add-on

    This is what I did for my K3 sliding tablesaw: Melamine-covered chipboard ...This section connects to the outfeed table ...These bolts were used as supports on the chassis side ...This is the side with the table levelled, but not attached ...These are bolt holes for a rail (for the extension table) that will be used (later I attached the rails over the bolts to be added) ...I drilled a length of 3mm aluminium for a support ...Attached to the chassis ...The rail (for the extension table) is placed over it ...Screw the aluminium to the router table - this supports it on the far side (it is supported on the opposite side with bolts into the outfeed). And replace the extension table ...The router table from the top ....I have connected an Elu 177e with a Router Raiser and Muscle Chuck.I built the fence from aluminium square section and faced with adjustable Maple sections ...Dust is connected to the rear ...Hope this helps anyone kin the same position.Regards from PerthDerek
  9. derekcohen

    Hammer K3 - off switch modification

    I have found the off switch for the Hammer K3 frustrating and potentially dangerous. It is tucked away under the rail and difficult to get to when working with the rip fence ...The on-switch is also small ...... but I am not bothered much by this since switching on is a deliberate act, while switching off may need to be done quickly.There is an off switch on the side by the panel, but this is only accessible when using the slider ...So today I built a paddle switch. This was to be a prototype, but it is good enough to stay on permanently ...The body is made of Jarrah (it needed to be stiff and have some weight), and covered in red perspex. The end is a simple hinge.It has been attached with double-sided tape, and it feels pretty strong.The positioning allows the on-button to be accessed as easily as before ...... while the off switch is now within reach of a palm or knee ...From the side, it can be seen that the off-switch is slightly higher than the on-switch. There is sufficient clearance to tap the paddle and depress the button. I love the way it works!Regards from PerthDerek
  10. derekcohen

    How do you guys hang Biesemeyer fences when not in use?

    The DC system is due to be upgraded next. It consists of a 2hp unit with a Super Dust Deputy and 5" hosing ... This has to feed from a combination jointer/planer (Hammer A3-31), Bandsaw (Hammer N4400) and sliding tablesaw (Hammer K3). It is simply not powerful enough (needs at least 3 hp) and larger pipes (6" has double the flow of 5", which has double the flow of 4"). By the time it gets to the table saw, there is not enough oomph to suck the dust at the blade guard. I now use a Festool CT26E at the dust guard, and this works very well ... Regards from Perth Derek
  11. derekcohen

    How do you guys hang Biesemeyer fences when not in use?

    I have a hanger arrangement above the table saw. Here you can see the mitre jig. There us space also for the crosscut fence from the slider ... Regards from Perth Derek
  12. derekcohen

    Japanese HSS vs Carbon Steel Tools

    I doubt that you could purchase the Fujikawa chisels for $40 each. These are described as PM-HSS. I have just one, and it is the hardest steel I have ever sharpened. The only way I can do this is to hollow grind it, which is not what you do with laminated steel. Having said this, it is possible that you could get a cheap HSS Japanese chisel - HSS has many levels of quality. Personally, I would rather have a decent white steel blade in the workshop building furniture. For the jobsite, HSS is another matter. It sounds very attractive ... but you still need to sharpen it, even if not as frequently. Regards from Perth Derek
  13. derekcohen

    Happy Daughter, Happy Wife

    Very nice! Any details of the construction and finish? Regards from Perth Derek
  14. derekcohen

    Micro bevel on chisels?

    For reproducibility, I create a hollow grind ... ... free hand hone directly on the hollow. The hollow acts as a jig. Quick. Sharp. Regards from Perth Derek
  15. derekcohen

    Veritas Paring Chisels Coming Soon?

    They are cranked neck chisels, but better than any others I have used. Absolutely flat. There's also an interesting twist to their design, but Rob may wish to describe this. Regards from Perth Derek