Islanderwi

Members
  • Content Count

    5
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

Profile Information

  • Woodworking Interests
    outdoor wood projects, beginning woodworker
  1. The tub pictured here is what I assembled for a customer a few years ago, http://www.cedartubs.com/images/measurments/5-metric-standard-large.jpg, I am using this as a guide for my own design. It implemented the cvg western red cedar and the canoe joint, the bottom was rabbited into the 2x6 - 48" tall staves and secured outside with the SS banding. I have easy access to white oak that is 3/4 thick and considering the attempt to fabricate the tub with this material, I have a concern if the oak would be strong enough in that thickness and I realize that my stave to bottom joint depth would only be about 3/8" deep dado. However, rather than purchasing 6/4 oak to make the staves I am also considering using a waterproof glue to glue up the oak I have to make 1 1/2 " thick staves. The canoe joint on the cedar has been watertight thru several seasons, drainings and refills. If I could afford the cedar I would do it with that material but it really is prohibitive. The Doug fir option mentioned by other posters is intriguing. I was not planning on putting any sealer on the interior of the tub. So it goes back to how the different species of wood would resist rot and respond to wet and dry conditions. well lots of things to consider. Thanks again for all your input! Once it warms up in my unheated shop I am going to start the project and hope to be soaking my mid May. I will post pictures and probably be looking for more input as I begin sizing up my materials.
  2. Thats ok, the other day I saw a worker using the table saw to rip strips of plaster board to fit in smaller areas. I don't want to be around when the motor fails soon. So using a hand plane to shape drywall is minor indulgence.
  3. You are right on target with these thanks so much. I have been researching cost of materials. I have been quoted prices of $6 plus dollars for c and better western red cedar in 2x6 per lf. I am thinking that maybe I could use white oak instead as the material costs are substantially less for that here in Wisconsin.
  4. yes you have described the joint as i have seen it...
  5. Hi folks, I am considering taking on the construction of an outdoor cedar hot tub. I want to build it using a joint that I have seen in use by kits I have assembled. The joint is called a canoe joint and it is used on 2x6 edges. I looked online to purchase a shaper/router bit set to achieve this joint and have only found ones that have smaller radius than i require for my staves. Any help you can provide in a source for this bit set would be very much appreciated. Thanks, Jerry