marist

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About marist

  • Birthday 06/22/1970

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  • Website URL
    http://www.birchwood2works.wordpress.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Lehigh Valley Pennsylvania
  • Woodworking Interests
    Hand tool use
    Home Made veneer
    Turning

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  1. I really like the bevel under the top too. I also like the subtle curves on the edges. What method did you use to make the bevel?
  2. I thought you folks would get a chuckle out of this. I waited too long to make Christmas presents last year and SWORE to myself I would start earlier this year. I made a kitchen island 3 years ago, but never finished making the drawers. Last winter I re-arranged my entire shop except for this one corner which I said I would do this fall. The other day I was walking past an empty wall in my hallway and thought "Hey! This would be a great place for a Krenov style standing cabinet!" So now I am going to put ALL of this stuff off even longer and build a Krenov style cabinet. I don't even know what I'll put in it, but I'm going to build it - just because this is my hobby and I want to :-)
  3. While the special deals have all but vanished from these shows, I always look forward to attending simply to test drive the hand tools. I really have a hard time spending $100.00 on a saw just because I think it will fit my hand judging from what I see in the pictures. But it is true, these shows need to be profitable to continue...
  4. I can't think of a better example of a kid who really looks up to his Father. Awesome doesn't quite cover it :-)
  5. I agree with everyone who has used the "buy 1 tool at a time" approach. There are so many crafts under the woodworking umbrella and it takes a while to see which ones you wnat to pursue. One thing that I like to remind folks about is the work space itself. As exciting as it is to buy tools we need to throw a few bucks to the area we will work in. Bright lights, heat or a/c, and a nice bench or work station are just a few "little things" that can make the small amount of time we get to spend in our "shops" much more enjoyable. I got that revelation when Christopher Schwarz remodeled his shop with a wood floor and painted beadboard walls. Take another cue from Marc who always uses T-1-11 siding in a small area of his shop - it makes it really easy to mount tools to the wall, but it looks 10 times better than plywood or painted OSB. For alot of us, woodworking as about the journey just as much as the destination, and if the space you are going to work in is both comfortable and visually appealing, you will get more enjoyment and satisfaction out of every project that you build.
  6. To throw 2 more cents in the pot, I had white walls for a number of years. I ended up with new lighting (T8? Thin tubes...) and painted 1/2 of my shop a very warm and considerably dark color. The new lights are so bright, the walls don't seem dark at all, and I like it 10 times better than the white. Now to move all my stuff out of the way to paint the floor.....
  7. I can't wait to see the drawers complete. Love spalted wood! Great project!
  8. How about "Damnit Jim! I'm a wood worker, not a doctor!"
  9. I would look forward to the new space. My shop is in the basement and some day I'll steal more space from the recreation side so I can purchase the last 2 major tools on the list (8" jointer and drum sander). I'm very satidfied with the tools I have and their layout, but it would be nice to have higher ceilings - I'm currently at 82". I would also take the time to paint the floor and install fluorescent fixtures to give me more even lighting. I've been upgrading the fixtures as time and money permit, but I still have alot of dark areas. And lastly, I would LOVE to get some heat! I have some portable heaters, but man, it would be great to be able to spend time in the shop without "waiting for the temp to come up". No complaints in the summer - it's almost a constant 67 degrees
  10. That rack will hold a ton of wood - looks great! I used a similar design when I built mine. The brackets have flat bottoms so I screwed a piece of 1/2" ply to the bottom of the brackets and that is where I keep all of my "Really Short" cut-offs. I don't know if that idea will work with your brackets, but I truly value that extra little space. Sorry for the bad phone pic, I couldn't find the cord for the camera.
  11. That's always been my feelings. If my boss knew there was a market to sell this stuff to (discounted or not) I'd NEVER get anything for free. Every shelf, cabinet, and drawer in my shop is made from scraps I took home
  12. Looks good Jay! I like the extra step with the tongue and groove edge banding. No way is that going to come off!
  13. I am a buyer for a contractor lumber yard. I was out in the warehouse today checking inventory when I saw this pile of mahogany in the garbage We had just received a skid of tongue and groove porch flooring and these were the slats used to keep the pile stable. They are roughly 1/4"x1-3/4"x36" pieces. I was in the middle of pulling them out of the trash when the poor guy who put the skid away happened to walk by. "What were you thinking man, this is MAHOGANY!" I yelled at him. "You've got to think like a wood worker! I can make something out of this!" We've worked together a long time so he just laughed and promised not to throw away any more wood. This is the kind of story that I tell my wife and she just rolls her eyes but I thought you folks might enjoy it.
  14. Thanks for the kind words Johan! The dovetails are hand cut. I've only done a few but I think they turned out fine. There is one small gap, but it faces the hinge side of the cabinet, so I don't think anyone will see it
  15. I'm not a fan of locking casters either. I did buy some for my planer cart that lock both the wheel and the swivel. I wouldn't want to use them for my lathe. I would try using the casters on a board trick. I'm sorry I don't have a better pic, but a mini lathe and table should be light enough to do something like this. Maybe someone else can chime in with better pictures - I found this on one of the forums. I'm not sure who originally posted it.