Trip

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Everything posted by Trip

  1. ==>What is corning? When sanding something other then bare wood (or bare wood with contaminates) the heat generated may melt finish/adhesive/etc into small clumps (seen most easily with shellac). These clumps create a scratch pattern (the pigtail) independent of the rest of the abrasive surface. In short, the minute you see something other than fine dust on the disk, it's done...
  2. ==>Rubin 2, as that is what was recommended for my applcation by festool (bare wood surface prep) Rubin is the best disk for bare wood... But terrible for anything other than bare wood... Adhesive, finish, etc will clog it immediately. Clogging is one of the fastest ways to get swirl marks... As a side note: I would not use Rubin with a 3mm stroke sander... I simply didn't use a fine-stroke sander under 240g. What are you sanding? Your photo shows a tint on the paper and what looks like corning... Again, that indicates something other than just bare wood in the mix... Corning will immediately create swirl marks...
  3. ==>ebay for 75% retail value. Well, it may not be worth diagnosing a sander you no-longer have... But for the next guy reading this, I would have tried two additional things: One would be adding lightening holes to reduce pressure below turtle -- I've seen this over on FOG on several occasions... Like I said, the DC maybe too good on the ETS... And try another abrasive --- say Abranet... BTW: You should try Abranet anyway -- get their sample pack off amazon and see how you like it... BTW: you need to up-disk on Abranet for equivalent surface -- so if you normally sand to 180 on Rubin, sand to 220 on Abranet... You know, you can put Abranet in the dishwasher and get some extra life -- until your wife catches you -- then your life is forfeit... ==>With a brand new disc, I wouldn't get pigtails. Literally three minutes later with the same disc, I would. Which abrasive?
  4. ==>Yeah full suction while sanding is not best practice The DC is almost too good on the FT/ETS sanders --- one of the reasons I sold all my ETS units... There's an old thread on this somewhere... I seem to remember being chided for referring to the 'turtle setting' --- hummmm, I wonder who that was.... But a viable solution is to create an ETS hose with some lightning holes to reduce the vac pressure. There's a photo of the config. An adjustable sleeve is used to moderate the pressure. I don't have experience with the new-gen ETS units, maybe they addressed the issue... ==>I had pigtail issues with my 150/3 Did you ever send it to FT to diagnose? BTW: Festool used to have a document on their website to diagnose pigtail issues... I don't see it anymore... I'll post it in the reference library...
  5. Rubin is bare wood only. The slight corning and tint tell me that there's more then just wood being sanded - residual finish, adhesive, or something. Too high a vac setting Improper disk alignment Failure to change loaded/corned paper.
  6. If you have (or can develop) a relationship with a local cabinet shop, then get a closed unit... For the one panel per year too large, just pay the $20 to have it surfaced...
  7. ==>I think you got off a little light in the punishment department. He sure did... If it had been a BCTW, then it would have landed butter-side down... That's why I could never own a BCTW plane... BTW: LN will send the replacement part free of charge and/or you could just send them the pane... When I need spare parts (over the years, I've had two block planes fall from my bench -- happened all by itself -- really), I usually combine parts with an order new kit so that they are not out the postage... I've always had good luck with their customer service... Several years ago, I had a rust issue (again, not my fault -- the shop gremlins strike again), and they re-surfaced a set of bench planes -- again, no charge... LN's a class act...
  8. Been using this for maybe 5 or 10 years. works well... http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=135 I get off-the-gun shellac and lacquer, so don't rub-out unless it's a piano finish. For solvent lacquers, I use Mohawk's flattener: http://www.mohawk-finishing.com/catalog_browse.asp?ictnbr=260 For shellac: http://www.finishsupply.com/ShellacFlatting.html Mohawk also makes some waterborne flatteners, but don't shoot waterborne... I can't recommend them, but in general, Mohawk makes a good product.
  9. ==>pin oak Oak, pine, whatever... So you've never been tempted to lighten it?
  10. The pine plank shop walls takes me back to weekends spent in my dad's shop... I always tell myself I'll go pine planks in my next shop... But it never seems to happen... Every shop's been 3/4 ply painted white myself.... Have you ever been tempted to whitewash the pine? My dad used a very thin blend of whitewash that's more translucent then pigment, but it added just that extra little bit of brightness that was helpful around the bench...
  11. ==>is this the guide you are talking about to have them send you or is there a more detailed one? There's a 40 page one... Many of the same topics, but more examples of 'good' and 'poor' layouts... If they've stopped distributing it, I'll eMail you a copy. ==>Just because he has a big shop doesn't mean he's ever going to have all the giant stationary tools that could fit in it or that he has to put everything that needs DC as far apart as possible. Agreed, but you misread my post entirely.... It's about design before requirements... That's my entire point: why pick 6" ductwork before you've gathered proper requirements... Evey time someone starts-off with 6" ductwork, it's "Yet another newbie has found CV or BP's site and read the marketing bullshit"... Sad...
  12. ==>when doing sculpted stuff Was going to add carving, but had second thoughts... Vacuum clamps hold pretty well, but I'm not sure I'd trust it for carving or shaping operations... When vacuum clamps let-go, it's kind of binary... There tends to be no 'creeping' like holdfasts -- no warning -- they just 'let go'... Which is fine for sanding operations... But I did have that happen during some edge routing -- that was exciting... I'd have to play with them a while before carving, shaping, sculpting, etc...
  13. ==>2 runs of 15' of 6" pipe following the wall on each side of that corner Why would you have a design without knowing any requirements? And why 6" runs? Especially in a 40x40 space? Your central trunk should match the DC inlet -- this is typically 8" The entire 'dual 6' is a ClearVue/BP thing because their cyclones can't properly drive larger ductwork. This limits tools to small inlet and/or short runs... Which, after all, is their target audience -- the small hobby shop with small tools... A 40x40 shop will probably have some runs that exceed 6" ductwork's capability... And if you ever get a drum sander, 6" ductwork is highly suspect. I'd start be reading Oneida's Ductwork Design Guide... Call them and they'll send you a copy free of charge... Until that arrives, you may want to start here: http://www.oneida-air.com/static.asp?htmltemplate=static/ductwork_tutorial01.html Here's Oneida's ductwork design requirements sheet: http://www.oneida-air.com/pdf/shop_plan_design_form_2014.pdf Good luck.
  14. Here's a resent thread on air compressor setups: Note: spraying with central air adds a good deal more requirements than just driving a pin nailer... It's why many go with a turbine setup.
  15. Suspect the biggest selling point will be it's color and, for Canadians, it'll come packaged in a systainer... Have been using vacuum clamping for only about three years, so I'm not really that knowledgeable... But, IMHO, the ability to tilt the work piece is of dubious utility... Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't say no to tilting clamps... But the clamping pods I've got now work AOK...
  16. ==>Absolutely. All those "blisters" will soon be "blotch." Which may or may not bother you Figures... Yea, would bother me... Spent a long time learning to finish Cherry and avoid blotch... Actually, it was the entire reason I got spray gear... I guess I've been lucky to avoid blistered stock...
  17. I sold six or seven FT items in a single transaction last year --- ended-up around 80% MSRP... Maybe I'd get 90% on a one-tool deal, but maybe not...
  18. Does 'blistering' make the stick more blotch prone?
  19. ==>4 weeks does not equal pronto? Considering it's latinate origin, four weeks is pretty good... You should deal with MananaParts... BTW: on a more serious note, parts sourcing is the down-side for Euro kit here in North America... Four, six or eight weeks is typical... I was down for a couple months waiting on a control board...
  20. ==>Lee Valley 50" Precision Straight Edge Good long-term investment... For jointer setup, I'd get that straight edge (2 would be better) and add the following: http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=32527&cat=1,43513,51657,32527 http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=32601&cat=1,42936,42941 6" or 8" and the 12" rule from a quality combo square... If within your budget, get a Starrett: http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=71651&cat=1,42936 There are better tools available for jointer setup --- including some very nice purpose-built products, but they cost more... The above is the minimum required. If budget allows, substitute the oneway dial gauge to set jointer outfeed table height relative to cutterhead arc for the 12" combo square blade: http://www.amazon.com/Oneway-2289-Multi-Gauge/dp/B0002SA98I But by all means, take a class first... Lacking foundation, you'll just continue banging your head against the wall with little to show for the pain...
  21. Think it's time to stop and get back to basics... Franklin Woodcraft 209 S Royal Oaks Blvd, Franklin, TN 37064 (615) 599-9638 http://www.woodcraft.com/stores/552/woodcraft-of-nashville.aspx I'd give them a call (they are open today) and ask about their next milling class... In an afternoon, you can get all this behind you... Until then, it's going to be frustrating and painful... Good luck.
  22. ==>A seven foot board can be straightened on a 4' bed (total length) jointer with no problem With your experience, yea... But for the rest of us? Actually, I was rather serious --- I'm not sure I could flatten a 7' stick on a 34" jointer... At least not to the tolerance that would make me happy... I even find the 2x rule to be a stretch for most...
  23. Trip

    BCTW HP-9!!!

    ==>^^^ Like to see that... Would really like to see the multi-profile plane... I'm starting to accumulate profile and molding planes, so appreciate the form... I'm not in the market for one -- I was quite serious about dropping tools... As much as I would like a BCTW plane, I just wouldn't trust myself owning one... Note: for those that haven't used profiles/molding/etc hand planes, the 'crispness' of the result is really impressive... I spent a long time using a router before the aha moment... Today, unless it's hundred's of linear feet, I'll grab the hand plane over the router... The results are really that much better...
  24. ==>I'll try some paraffin wax next. Why? Absolutely squat to do with the problem at hand... ==>I'll try some more adjustments. Why? Think you need to take a step back and learn how a jointer flattens a face. Jointing a taper is almost always a cutterhead arc/outfeed table problem... ==>What's a boy to do that's building a work bench with too small of a planer? Ha. Learn how to use the tool with appropriately-sized stock. Until you do, you'll just be sacrificing stock to poor tool setup and poor technique... ==>7' stock You should either learn how to use hand planes or build some smaller-scale projects before tackling 7' stock.
  25. The arc of the cutterhead is not in-plane with the outfeed table... There are numerous articles on setting cutterhead arc: https://woodgears.ca/jointer/knives.html Doesn't matter if it's knives, shelix, whatever... Check the part of the article covering protrusion... Contrary to much talking head and web-based 'advice', it's generally accepted best practice to set the cutterhead arc to protrude 1thou to 1.5thou above the plane of the outfeed table... The reasons for this are out of scope. Here's a decent video explaining how cutterhead arc impacts results: ==>on the 7' stock I'm working on now This is too long for noobie jointing -- sorry.... Practice on stock that's the same length of the infeed table until you get the process locked-down... Then you can consider longer sticks... PS. Just so you know, I'm not convinced you can ever flatten a 7' stick on a 43" infeed table -- at least I'm not sure I can, if that makes a difference... Note: I'm pretty sure Chuck Norris can...