Trip

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Everything posted by Trip

  1. Trip

    BCTW HP-9!!!

    ==>Ask, and receive. Hummmmm, that's a lot of asking... I'm jealous --- not about the planes --- but that you won't drop them off the bench! If I had anything like that, a sander hose would suddenly swoooooosh across my bench (by itself, you understand) --- and all that steel hits the floor... Those shop gremlins get me every time...
  2. Don't know if it helps -- I get it in 5g drums from the ruststore.com: https://www.theruststore.com/Evapo-Rust-5-Gallon-P35.aspx I see that the price has increased a bit... My last purchase was $79... Don't know it that's a good price or not...
  3. ==>I hope you got some sleep! He got the sleep -- it was the EvapoRust doing all the work... @tom - send them the before and after -- maybe they'll send you a free gallon...
  4. ==>Did you Google that? Nope. Off the top of my head.... Sorry...
  5. ==>I've never heard of the brand MiniMax before. Ate they a European maker? MM is the North American distribution channel for Group SCM. The NA arm manages trade dress, sales and post-sales support. It's a second-tier Euro Mfgr... The brand raised it's visibility with William Ng switching to MM milling gear...
  6. ==>new vegetable garden Now, was this before you discussed your -- ahhhh --- irrigation system?
  7. ==>my pieces are cut exactly the same length so how can it be of Stacking tolerances... An insignificant single angle error will become significant when multiplied by all the cuts.
  8. Isn't WTO a family-friendly site? Unless my video feed was suddenly hijacked, I believe there was a demonstration of spousal approval --- at what was [probably] thought to be beyond camera range?...
  9. Ahhh, that's right, Riverside is part of Greenwich township... $200/sq would be about right for an Architect job... I can see the limitations from the site plan... I'd have been tempted to off-set it towards the rear deck -- that way you could feign a dip in the pool and sneak-off to the shop... I see the drainage setup... My parents are in the Old Lyme area, so get the stormwater requirement... Post Sandy town requirements are a bitch... No septic field? No bathroom?
  10. Being near Stamford, I was going to guess $80-$90/sq... Let me guess, the Architect approach got you to about $125/sq? Is HVAC and a bathroom in that number? How's the town with an outbuilding in front of the main structure? Around here, we'd have to put it out back... Unless you claim it's a garage or carriage house... Did you pull a permit for a garage, home office, what?
  11. ==>Rodern. Mustic? Modern Rust? There's a bunch of artists in Brooklyn doing a lot with metal&wood -- here's an example: http://markjupiter.com/collection/seating/cherry-beam-bench/. All very cool...
  12. Pulled-up the video feed... Nice camera and the video stream is smooth... Is the stream recordable or do you need a separate camera for that? It would be fun as a stop-action... We've got the same weather here, so it'll be a wet day for the crew...
  13. There's an entire website for old pattern gear: http://www.owwm.org/ No treatise today -- I'm trying to break that habit... Tilting Table: Pattern work requires lots of relief angles... So much may be 89d or 91d... There's an old saying in pattern work, if it's 90d, something's wrong... Head Diameter: The diameter of the head is all about the quality of the surface... Ever wonder why hobby-kit heads are around 3", but pro gear starts at 6"? Note: before someone mentions PM having 3" heads, that's still hobby kit.... In pro gear, the larger head provides mass, improved angle of attack, and low protrusion. Today, pro-kit heads start at 6" and continue to around 10", with 8" being the sweet-spot for non-industrial gear... ==> Im not doubting the machinists of 100+ years ago, but how do they compare to high end jointers of today? Quality pattern gear was milled, not ground. Assuming the gear has been cared for, you can expect 0.003 over 100" tables (frequently better). Modern top-shelf kit is still made that way (think Northfield, Felder, et al). That's one reason why quality jointers start around $10K... ==>read before about guys having old porters etc. re-milled before using them. This leads me to believe the old ones aren't incredibly flat. More likely misuse, age, poor storage conditions, rust, relocation damage, etc... After the war, most of the gear wasn't cared for very well... No one cared... ==>Even on my little 6" jointer I wouldn't joint anything less than 15" in length. Good advice... As the stock becomes smaller, milling operations become more risky to fingers... PS. Don't you love the way it's bolted to the floor? You might think someone would accidentally move it looking for a dropped screw??? Or maybe it was to prevent employee theft??? PPS... Notice how the listing provides all pertinent information -- except how much it weighs??? One, I bet he doesn't know... And two, if you have to ask, then you probably can't afford the riggers... PPPS: Does it come with a mobil base?? All my kit up to 1500lbs has a mobile base... You can get them custom made for gear up to 3000lbs...
  14. Lacquer. Remove it with lacquer thinner -- available at any hardware store. Lacquer thinner isn't exactly good for you, so wear kitchen gloves... Good luck.
  15. ==>Hide glue should allow it to break if needed. Hummmmm.... Water-based adhesive and tool steel? Let's see if we can improve on that: http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Adhesives/Tapes/Products/~/Non-Structural-Adhesives?N=5003404&rt=r3
  16. ==>I have an extra arbor nut for the table saw. You know, no matter how many tablesaws I get, I always promise myself to get an extra nut... I never manage it... Now, if I every get that V-8 powered DC setup, then I may have to...
  17. ==>verify if the design is in there, give me the ISBN number and I can order it through the library. Danish Farmer's Trestle Table executed by Mario Rodriguez The upper part of the legset is a U (similar to the plate you reverence) and the lower is a stylized S. Obviously, if you have your heart set on upper and lower Us, it's an easy modification. I'm glad I checked, the design is in Taunton's Tables book: ISBN 1-56158-342-1 -- not their Dining Tables book... The legset is attached to battens (more on those later) with removable pegs at the top of the U and the stretcher is tusk tenon. Pull a couple of pins, and it easily breaks-down... Great... I've got one issue with Mario's execution: the legset pins to a batten underneath the table (which is fine)... The two battens (one for each U) serve two important purposes: keeps the top flat and prevents the legset from racking... Where I take issue: the batten is attached to the top with a sliding dovetail. I'd have to see a period example before embarking on that design choice... A 30" sliding dovetail would be a bitch to assemble. And if you made it loose enough to assemble easily, I'm not sure what purpose it serves... A tapered sliding dovetail would be a better choice (but harder to execute)... ==>Such a dramatic sweep of curve would lead to lots of weak short grain spots. Agreed. The design executed by Mario lacks the wide sweep... While a great artist, there's no guarantee that HHtY didn't photoshop the table a bit to fit his composition... Also, there's a height/width thing... Trestle designs only work well if they are fairly narrow... You don't want the legset protruding wider than the top... Assuming a 29" height and 32" width, having a wide-swept U legset might not work... You could model it in Sketchup to see if it works... Note: It's really better to use physical examples from museum collections rather than artist's representations... ==>I think they cut the entire thing out if one ginormous log, with a broad axe! That very well may be the case... But the design emphases mobility... Generally each legset is executed in two pieces and the stretcher's long tenon pierce the two sections and the tuck locks the entire assembly together... Again, actual period pieces make the best reference... Many museums have their collections on-line... You may browse some Northern Euro museum collections to find an exact fit... Good Luck!
  18. ==>infeed table that tilts standard pattern jointer feature.
  19. ==>each trestle is stylized 'x' Taunton's Dining Table design book has at least one of this design -- from memory, I think it's two... Includes measured drawing, construction details, etc.... If you want to buy the book from Amazon, I'll find my copy and verify the design is in there... You may wish to browse the MET's on-line site for their Northern Euro period collection... This should get you started: http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search?ft=furniture&noqs=true There are about 500K pieces in their collection, so have fun... The MET store also sells books detailing their period rooms (entire rooms setup as they were for the period). If you are ever in NYC, they are worth seeing... I spent a few minutes browsing and found this, not quite right: http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/8813?rpp=90&pg=4&ft=furniture&what=Wood|Oak&pos=294 But there were 6000 search results including tables, so I'll let you have the fun.. I seem to remember the key to their design is that they're supposed to be easily broken-down and moved...
  20. Suspect it's more about workflow... Draw one side and use push/pull would be my bet...
  21. ==>I like the store, but do my best to stay away from their branded items. The stores are amazing... I know guys who make it a day-trip --- the spring sale is like an annual pilgrimage or rite-of-passage... I've got some of their house-brand gear --- it's not fancy, but works fine... I've not purchased anything from Cabela's in over a decade, so don't know how quality has held-up... But to Mel's point -- they sure love to plaster their name on things in as big a font as they can... Over the weekend, I went looking for my fly gear -- haven't seen it in at least a couple of years... I really should do a bit of fishing this year -- the problem is, I say that every year... In the good old days, lived on a lake. After work, would grab a bottle of red wine and push-off in a boat -- rarely caught a thing, but that really wasn't the point...
  22. ==>^^^ Last time I looked, 3M's adhesive catalog was around 30 pages... So there must be something... But honestly, plane shavings are both ubiquitous and free... It's kinda hard to beat free... BTW: I've also used sawdust -- and that also works... Shavings are just less messy...
  23. ==>^^^ Or you can use the candle trick... I'll let you look that one up... Tuning the tenon can work, but it might not... Part of the issue is an ill-fitting tenon... But the other part problem is that tangs can be ill-formed... So shaving the tenon will only remove excess stock -- not provide stock where deficits exist... That's where the place shaving comes into its own --- it fills deficits, where needed... Obviously, the 'best' method to address both issues is epoxy, but the cure is worse than the disease...
  24. ==^^^ It's generally accepted best practice to use a short length of flex hose to connect the shop's ductwork to the tool's DC inlet... It's also accepted best practice to keep the 'last mile' connection to four feet of flex or less... All my stationary tools have four feet of flex for the last mile... The only exception is my spindle sander which I sometimes relocate for long stock -- that's about six feet of flex...