Trip

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Everything posted by Trip

  1. Here’s a quick Tip from this weekend’s shop 'entertainment'... And figure it's better to read tips than listen to talking heads cover the Iowa Caucasus -- so everyone get's a second Tip today! After dinner on Friday, entered the shop to get a jump on milling stock for my Entertainment Center build... I like to mill in two-stages, so this was an opportunity to spend an hour or two on Friday night to save a full day over the weekend... Great, right? Well, during my very first minute in the shop, dropped the TS arbor nut changing to a rip blade... Damn! It's going to be a long night.... No big deal, right... Happens every once in a while – no problem... Except this time, it fell into the dust collection funnel, down the DC pipe, out the DC port, into the ductwork and Gone! Double Damn! After I stopped swearing, I used the shop’s magnetic ‘grabber’ (a magnet at the end of a 30” flexible wand) to go spearfishing.... Skunked! Now this was a real problem: the nut went down the saw, out the DC port and well along the DC flex hose... I could relocate the outfeed table, disassemble the flex connection, ground strap, and ---- Ahhhh, nope.... This is becoming too much like work... Needed some new fishing gear... Enter the Orvis Steelhead: The Cabela’s version Dropped the magnet down the funnel and it tumbled out the saw and into the DC system... After several casts, got a hit! Saved... OK... So maybe it's not such an exciting Tip, but it sure saved me an hour or so... And I'm a lazy sod, so I'm all for saving time. So it's a good Tip for the lazy... So it cost me $5 for a twice-yearly fishing tournament... I win every time... PS... There's a serious side to this Tip: perhaps it saved me much more than an hour.... I dropped the arbor nut because I was tired... That violates my most sacred rule of hobby woodworking: don't work with power tools if you are tired... After I retrieved the nut, I realized my mistake and spent the remainder of my shop time sharpening and putting tools away... 2c. PPS. I use the Cabelas version -- I got the Orvis reel out from the back of a closet just to see if I could still locate my fly gear... PPPS. And before someone asks, yes that's a genuine vintage CFO 123 reel (screws, not rivets) -- not the reissue! And no, I will not sell it to you! Be safe...
  2. For those looking for some cyber-woodworking as a rational alternative to the Iowa Caucasus, here's a new Tip... Last week’s tip was more of an involved technique, and didn’t seem to resonate with many WTO members... So, I’ve made the switch to simple tips that solve actual problems from the weekend's shop frustrations --- stuff that may be immediately usable to a wider audience... Hope the change meets with more success... Well, winter’s here and the heating has kicked-into high-gear... Right now, the shop's sitting at 32%RH... ..and... This has become a familiar scene: Actually, a more realistic scene is me cursing-up a storm as the chisel’s edge hits the ground with the handle still sitting firmly in my hand... Sound familiar??? Socket-chisels have a lot going for them, but the handle coming-off at inopportune times is not one of them... For those not t familiar with socket-chisels, they have a hollow tang to accept the handle. This design has several advantages: it's very strong, permits easy replacement of the handle if it breaks and allow easy substitution between striking (bench) and push (paring) handles depending on the job at hand... To switch handles, sharply tap the handle against the bench, the handle pops-out... Or in my case, wait until winter and the chisels will fall from my racks like icicles from my gutters... The solution to a loose handle provided by LN: use hairspray (cheap spray lacquer) to adhere the handle to the chisel... The big advantage is you can still switch handles with ease and the process is completely reversible. The downside, it rarely works for long --- hairspray is not gap filling... The solution proposed by several very notable talking heads: epoxy the handle to the chisel (and no, I'm not joking)... The big advantage is that it’s permanent. The downside is that it’s permanent – and rather defeats the point of purchasing socket-chisels... There must be a better way.... If your bench is like mine, there’s always a pile of shavings in the corner -- or go make some: Wrap the shavings around the handle’s tenon: And you’re done... Note: the shaving fills the voids in the tang. The handle is now tight and won't unintentionally slip off... Enjoy...
  3. Required after every use? It depends... If your shop is a conditioned space, then no. Oil after sharpening for sure... If your shop is not conditioned, or a basement shop that's conditioned but quite damp, then yea oil after ever use... You're about an hour north of me... If you were woodworking in the summer on '13, then you'd remember the unusually humid weather that season... Actually, it was a record... Even with a reasonably conditioned space, you might oil them after use... Also, if you've been planing for a while, then wipe-down the plane body... What I do: Purchase 3-36 by the gallon and fill pump bottles... http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002SK8QQK?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_search_detailpage http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BCH4WTA?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_search_detailpage After sharpening, I squirt some onto a microfiber cloth and wipe-down the tool. Note: this is a tip from Chris Schwarz and beats my previous recommendation of a cotton rag: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000XECJES?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_search_detailpage Keep the microfiber cloth in a jar for reuse... If I'm resharpening a plane iron, I take the opportunity to squirt some 3-36 directly onto the plane body, lever-cap, etc and just give the entire thing a wipe-down... I use compressed air to lightly blow the puddled oil out of the nooks&crannies (you don't want to shoot oil all over the shop)... That's what I do... But Terry's right, best practice it to wipe-down your tools before putting them away... It's what you should do... You may get away 'just after sharpening' for years, then another humid summer like '13 and you're screwed... Best practice is after use... But I'm not that tool-care-oriented... I should be...
  4. ==>I think you could get by with a fine/ extra fine and some leather strops Stropping single-edge tools has been addressed numerous times on WTO, but it bears repeating... Unless you are comfortable free hand honing, the odds are against successfully improving a polished edge with a strop... This point is so important that I’ll repeat it: For the vast majority of WTO members, stropping single-bevel bench tools is a mistake. It will not improve an edge polished on a J8000 stone (about 1.2u-1.4u). Secondly, the edge will [probably] become rounded, thereby degrading the tool's performance... However – this is woodworking, so there’s always a however: for those who free-hand hone on regular daily basis, stropping can (and rather efficiently), hone an already sharp (but not polished) edge without going to the stones. That’s why you see [some] talking heads recommend stropping single-bevel chisels... That’s why you might want to learn the technique... Important Note: we’re talking single-bevel edge tools (chisels, plane irons, etc). In other words: edges formed by a flat plane and a single-bevel with, potentially one or two secondary bevels (aka micro-bevel). We are not talking about carving gouges or other double-bevel edge tools (no flat plane)... Now some will shout, “I use a super-duper polishing compound on my strop that’s made from 0.5u fairy dust, so it’s much better than a J8000 stone”... The answer is, no you don’t. The vast majority of polishing grits available to hobbyist woodworkers are a mix of around 20% chromium oxide (0.5u) and 70% aluminum oxide (2u). On average, this blend equates to #6000. Note: this includes the “0.5u special grade” honing compounds marketed by several woodworking specialty suppliers --- who will remain nameless (but have the initials LV, V, TFWW, etc)... In full disclosure: there is some 0.5u grit in their ’special-grade’ compound, but it’s mostly 2u compound in bulk by Formax and relabeled... Also in the spirit of full disclosure, most of my single-bevel tools are honed on waterstones to J8000 (1.2u)... For reference, that’s around a 13K Shapton stone... When an edge starts to dull, I’ll hit whatever’s on my bench. This may include a strop, oilstone and/or MDF/diamond paste. It makes no difference... Grit is grit (well, almost – but that’s another thread)... I’ll do this for a couple rounds until the edge needs a real honing, then it’s back to the stones... ==>mirror polish This is another subject covered extensively... Ever wonder why natural Japanese waterstones (colloquially, J-Nat, JNS, at al) always win the planing competitions, but don't leave a mirror polish? The answer is simple: There's a difference between a mirror polish and sharp... There's also a difference between sharp and the ability to effectively cleave wood fibers... While a mirror edge looks pretty, that doesn't mean it will effectively work wood... Doesn't mean that it won't, but doesn't mean that it will either... Don't get me wrong, I love the look of a mirror polish -- and on some of my bench chisels, I have that... But on my finest paring chisels, the finish is anything but mirror (see links below). These edges are polished on natural stones and are both way sharper and cut wood fibers much more effectively than my mirror-polish bench kit... For a more complete discussion on both of the above, see Ron Hock’s Sharpening Blog: https://hocktools.wordpress.com/ For a trip down the rabbet hole: http://www.japanesenaturalstones.com/about-japanese-natural-stones/ Or for trip into the abyss: http://www.swordpolisher.com/
  5. Probably a demo piece left over from a class... Probably not meant to be an example of good design, but clean execution... The joinery will look a lot better when planed... Personally, I prefer the lower density (and smaller) pins more common in traditional pieces... On a drawer that size, I'd have stuck to three tails (two pins and two half-pins)... If forced to include a HT, then I'd spread the two pins and add a single smallish HT pin in-between...
  6. I wouldn't run adhesives through a gun that you care about... I've used disposable guns for adhesives, at al --- and they are OK for just getting coating onto the surface for brushing-in. They cost about $15, you run the coating then toss the gun.. HF has one for $12 that works OK... That's about as cheap as they get...
  7. Trip

    New Saws Crap?

    ==>there was not a $250 difference to me So it comes down to how one values $250... Some see it as next month's rent... Some see it as an investment to last a lifetime (or three) and amortize over the long haul... For many, it must be worth it --- or Mark wouldn't have a business model... This thread has run it's course, and I second closing it out... I'm out.
  8. Trip

    New Saws Crap?

    ==>^^^ The differences can be just fit/finish, but there can also be more to it then that... It's how the saw feels in our hands: the balance, the heft, the hang, shape of the handle, etc... For me, the BaT and Gramercy just feel better... And compared against LN, BaT cuts with more authority... It's a personal thing... Tactile... Both work, but one feels 'better' performing the operation... So yea, with practice, you can cut dovetails with just about any saw... Chris Schwarz did a blog post on cutting dovetails with a Panel Saw... But for many, working with hand tools is more than just the result... If it were just about results, then we'd all be cutting tailboards on a bandsaw (still the most accurate technique I know)... To Lama's point, threads like this are largely useless... You can't just snipe at an entire class tools that you've never used, seen, owned, whatever... Threads like this are largely self-justifications of preconceived purchasing decisions... Go to a show and try the tools for yourself side-by-side... Then you can return to tell us about how your Irwin felt just as good gang-cutting tailboards as a BaT...
  9. ==>drawers so we can get rid of one of our dressers and free up space in the bedroom Check with the wife on those as well... Again, in my limited experience: unless clothing can be stored in sealed plastic totes, the women in my life won't store items under the bed -- bedbugs, you know... Note: it seems shoe boxes are AOK under the bed (as long as they have new shoes in them). It's always struck me odd how shoes (and to a lesser extent, purses) seem exempt from all common household rules. Actually, I'm sure shoe acquisition and storage would violate the laws of echnomics & physics, if needed... If my wife could have TARDIS to store her shoes, she'd become a Time Lord...
  10. Check with the wife about those side panels -- at least in my experience, most like to vacuum under the bed (all those bedbugs, you know)... Although for a child's bed, panels may be just fine --- no place for the monsters to hide...
  11. Trip

    New Saws Crap?

    ==>Yeah but when someone spends $15,000 for a table I think they have more money than sense. When someone spends $300 on a 10" saw what am I to think? You ever own a $15K table? I know lot's of people who spend that on a piece of furniture --- and they are very happy... Ever use a BaT? I know lot's of people who spring for a $300 saw -- and they are very happy... I've owned and used side-by-side LN, Gramercy, BaT, Independence, G&S and one or two others... They all cut dovetails just fine... I can make them all work and get the same results with each (all marginal, I might add)... But I do appreciate the fit/finish of a BaT over an LN as I'm hacking my way though a cut... At one point, my dad told me there is something satisfying about using a high-quality tool... That's why he used Snap-on and not Rigid... And now that I own my own tools, I have to agree...
  12. This issue has still been gnawing at me... I haven't found an explanation that I'm satisfied with... In short, I can't see it... ==>horizontally One reason chips entering the filter stack aren't always disastrous is their tendency to remain in the filter pan (gravity) and not swirl around after their initial entry into the stack... Mounting filters horizontally (which I've never seen before) may permit chips to swirl in the filter rather than drop to the pan and damage the ePTFE coating on HEPA filters... Once the first breach occurs, the chips would be naturally drawn to that area via differential pressure -- rapidly increasing the damage to that area... So the problem could be a combination of horizontal mounting, chips and a HEPA/ePTFE filter... Now I can see it... BTW: more of the filter damage on the face pointing towards the floor? Before ordering new filter media, I'd talk to someone about horizontal mounting. If you must go that route, then SpunPoly may be the best media for that application... It's the most durable...
  13. Arrange veneer for a tight-seam, temporarily hold seam together with blue-tape across the seam on back face, wet veneer tape with sponge (not dripping wet, just wet), apply along veneer seam on face side, let dry maybe a minute or two.
  14. Before you eat the filters... Send the photos to Oneida... Who knows, maybe it's a known mfg defect... The odds are, you won't see a dime... But ten minutes and an 800 number may save you $400... Kind of like dropping a chisel onto the concrete floor... For some reason that defies both physics and statistics, it's 99% chipped edge... But that 1%... One last thought... DC setups assume a range of back-pressures. Some of the nano filters use small pleating and have a very large surface area -- this could be good or bad, depending. Until caked, the airflow may exceed the impeller/motor design envelope. It may be in your manual, but if not, contact CV and ask about filter compatibility...
  15. Run system, one tool at a time, one blast gate at a time wand the smoke from the tool DC inlet to the trunk... Cycle blast gate. Many leaks are in/around gate connections. Run system with two farthest blast gates open. Wand the trunk... Run the system with two largest blast gates open. Wand the cyclone, bin, exhaust and filter... Run system with all blast gates closed. Wand all gates. Fix all leaks. Wait 24hrs. Repeat until all leaks fixed.
  16. Most bins themselves don't leak, it's the through-penetrations. Bin sensors, hose attachments, top attachment, etc... Also the connection from the bin to the lower cyclone unit -- that pipe is notorious for leaks -- you torque it every time you empty the bin... I'm not familiar with that stack -- it's new to Oneida. I'm not sure who makes it... But the filter pleats are very susceptible to damage from the inside -- chips, dentures, whatever... Check for leaks so it doesn't get any worse... Assuming you don't want to drop $400 on a new stack... I've seen a thread on repairing the pleating from chip damage -- can't think where -- sawmillcreak, lj, don't know... You'll have to look for it -- I registered that the thread existed, but didn't read for content... One other point -- the HEPA coated filters are great, but a bit less robust then spun poly canisters (have had both)... The HEPA traps finer duct particles, but it's more sensitive to damage - and more expensive to replace... But HEPA e/PTFE addresses the caking issue, so that's big... The other way to damage a HEPA filter is with compressed air... Much internet knowledge is based on Nano, Cel/Poly and SpunPoly, et al cartridges... You see YouTube videos of folks banging them against the floor, washing them with hoses, using compressed air, etc -- I saw one using a pressure washer!... You've got to be really careful with compressed air around the HEPA pleating. You just might end-up with damage that looks exactly like yours... Hummmm...
  17. This issue has been gnawing at me... I don't like problems that gnaw... I've never used that particular stack, but I've used plenty of others... That being said, it's too much damage for just one small amount of chips... One thing that kills the filter stack in this way is a leak in the lower cyclone housing and/or bin assembly... Do you have a smoke stick? Now, before you say you can find the leaks without using smoke -- you can't... I run a smoke test once a year and ALWAYS find at least one leak -- usually three (mostly around blast gates)... But sometimes around the cyclone/bin assembly itself... Note: I never suspect the leaks I find... I use this: http://www.mcmaster.com/#4101t5/=10uonb0 It's kind of overkill, but will last you forever... The advantage is you can use it for five minutes to find the leaks, extinguish the smoke and restart it after the repair... Many less expensive sticks can't be re-lit -- or just outright suck -- hummmm... When you get the chance, put a pressure sensor at the exhaust plenum... It's a good way to monitor throughput... I check mine when I empty the bin -- can be surprised what you find... Found some dentures once... Good luck...
  18. If you post over on LJ, you’re more likely to get a proper answer... I’ve seen too many examples of countertops that look great on day-one and get lots of ‘well done’, ‘looks great’ and ‘congratulations’, but will look like crap in five years... Refinishing kitchen countertops is generally invasive (take-away, eat-out, etc) and have high potential for spousal downside... I’d get input from someone who knows what he/she is doing -- i.e. a pro countertop guy...
  19. Thanks Pete... Avoiding layering flatteners does improve clarity... I’m kind of surprised more folks haven’t noticed the impact... I suppose it depends on what you’re used to... Much of my film finishing is shellac, which is probably the clearest film finish available... Anything that impacts clarity gets noticed... The other reason to limit yourself to gloss is cost, storage and finish age-outs... If you keep cans of gloss, semi, satin and/or matte, then the odds of one or more going bad is much higher than if you just keep gloss and add flatteners as needed... Once I started managing the sheen myself, the number of cans on my shelf dropped by almost a third... It really does help... And a quart of flattening agent goes a long way...
  20. Trip

    Outdoor Oil Help

    The most efficacious outdoor oil that I've used are the Waterlox marine oil products: https://www.waterlox.com/products-item/waterlox-original-UV-protection-marine-wood-sealer https://www.waterlox.com/products-item/waterlox-original-UV-protection-marine-finish ==>Is 4 or 5 coats overkill? Can't reverse-engineer what went wrong... You've got to start from a newly-prepped surface and follow the directions on the can... If you have questions, call the technical assistance line... You can't just wing-it... ==>basically small black spots mildew... You'll have to kill the mildew... There are lot's of products that'll help with that... Then sand-back all the crud, dirt, etc... Good luck...
  21. Tip #10a: To control inventory, it's much better to purchase ONLY gloss topcoats and add flatteners as needed... Purchasing cans of gloss, semi-gloss, etc is a waste of time, money and space... Further, many coats of semi-gloss muddy the grain... So the finish looks much better with coats one to say four in gloss and coat five in semi-gloss... This goes for products like Arm-R-Seal as well... So, I purchase ARS in clear gloss gallon size, then add a bit of flattener to the last coat if I want a semi-gloss sheen... So maybe two tips for the price of one?
  22. ==>Are those pieces exposed to full sun? Exposed to full sun... Except at night --- or covered in 32" of snow... The outdoor dining set (from which the bench photos were taken) was finished some five+ years before the photos were taken... So that's five plus years in all weather... I'll get about 10 years before refinishing... ==>Is it available in a lower sheen & if so, do you have experience with it? Yes and Yes... I've used the Matte, but don't like it... Nowadays, I only purchase gloss finishes and apply gloss for all coats until the last... It it's a hard finish, I rub-it-out... If it's poly/varnish/etc, then I add a flattening agent. Flatteners come with a mix table to get the sheen you want... http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=135&familyName=Interlux+Flattening+Agent+for+One+Part+Finishes I'll update the post with more info...
  23. Everyone have fun shoveling snow over the weekend? No time for the shop? Well, it's Monday and and a great day for some cyber-woodworking... Here's a Tip to forget the snow and start the week! Remember those planters from last September? Well here they are enduring this weekend's snow storm – I’m serious about my outdoor projects being outdoors 7x24x365... I've posted parts of my outdoor finish process, but it's ever been gathered all in one place... With this weekend's snow, what better time to talk about weatherproofing your outdoor pieces... Which sets-up today's Tip... For outdoor furniture, rot starts from the ground-up... Stop the Rot! Tip #10: UHMW pads... In over a decade, I’ve never had rot develop in any of my outdoor pieces... And UHMW pads are a big part of that success... Say the piece ends in a 1 ½" x 1 ½" square foot (above)... I cut the UHMW from sheet stock into 1 ¼" x 1 ¼" square pads and bevel ¼”... This makes the pad quite hard to notice from above... http://www.mcmaster.com/#8752k314/=10u42c2 I secure the pad with #8 x 1 ¼" stainless round head wood screws. I squirt some CA into the pilot holes to reinforce the wood fibers and prevent rot starting in the screw holes... http://www.mcmaster.com/#wood-screws/=10u41tf Note: I sure hope the clocking is inadvertent --- if I took the time to clock screws on the bottom of furniture legs, then my OCD would be incurable... Closeup of outdoor dining set completed in '09 Two species of Genuine Mahogany to provide contrasting tones Sits uncovered outdoors 7/24/365 Original finish: CPES, Epifanes Gloss Never re-coated Image taken in July 2014 @hhh EOS 50/2.8 Closeup of finish after five years exposure, several hurricanes, blizzards, etc. @hhh EOS 50/4 Finish Procedure: Sand to 150. Seal with CPES. Depending on species, it can take from 1 to 5 coats of CPES to seal the stock... Two is typical... It's expensive (about $110/gal), but the best outdoor sealer available -- IMHO... Note: Due to a mfg/distributor "disagreement", genuine CPES has become harder to find (although look-alikes have become prevalent). You can purchase the stuff directly at the source: http://www.rotdoctor.com/products/product.html. One nice thing about purchasing from the Rot Doctor, you can call the technical help line and talk to guy who invented the stuff... And he is really smart Note: Andy Miller (aka, BWT, WTO Mentor) uses West 105/206 as a sealer --- and that also works well... He's got a YouTube video of a Mahogany finish using 105/206, then applying Pettit marine varnish.. I suspect if you substituted 105/207 and thinned it 50:50 with Xylene, you'd get something akin to CPES... I had to do this once when I couldn't source CPES, and it seems to work AOK... Here's the detailed procedure: http://www.smithandcompany.org/varnishpriming.html The key to the finish is applying the first coat of thinned varnish before the last coat of CPES cures (within 24hrs). I start the topcoat schedule with thinned 50:50 Epifanes high-solids high-UV gloss varnish http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=92&familyName=Epifanes+Gloss+Clear+Varnish. But you can certainly use Pettit... When the CPES cures, the first layer of varnish is bonded to the epoxy layer... Lightly scuff the first varnish layer (you don't want to expose the CPES layer), and apply another four to eight coats of varnish according to the instructions on the can... Yea... Yea... Before someone says it, marine finishes are expensive, but they sure work... If you think about the totality of your project, you might use around $300 or so for an outdoor dining set, but how much is your time worth? And considering the finish is going to last years.... It's worth it... BTW: the UHMW pads have another great benefit... You can slide tables, chairs, etc over the deck and not scratch the deck's finish... Around here, that keeps the wife happy... There's a lot to be said for keeping the wife happy... Happy shoveling... ... and Stop The Rot! <edit> Couple of notes: I always start my outdoor finish schedule with gloss topcoats... Some pieces may benefit from a semi-gloss to hide scratches... If I need a semi-gloss, I add a flattening agent to the last coat of gloss varnish... Manufacturers sell proprietary flattening agents, but I use this: http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=135&familyName=Interlux+Flattening+Agent+for+One+Part+Finishes for all one-part varnishes, poly, etc... It comes with a mix table for Semi-Gloss, Matte, etc... I've gone to Matte, but I don't think it looks so hot... YMMV... To control inventory, it's much better to purchase ONLY gloss topcoats and add flatteners as needed... Purchasing cans of gloss, semi-gloss, etc is a waste of time, money and space... Further, many coats of semi-gloss muddy the grain... So the finish looks much better with coats one to [maybe] four in gloss and coat five in semi-gloss... This goes for products like Arm-R-Seal as well... So, I purchase ARS in clear gloss gallon size, then add a bit of flattener to the last coat if I want a semi-gloss sheen... So maybe two tips for the price of one?
  24. ==>Soak the handle with the head installed, I believe. Exactly... I'll update the post...
  25. ==>My thought is that I put the tenons in for the breadboard, then chisel that section out square and glue in a small piece then sand it flush. That sound reasonable? My thought is that the box is going to be 1/4" smaller... Making square repairs more noticeable... The eye is drawn to straight lines, especially cross-grain straight lines... Can't find the chip?