Barron

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About Barron

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  • Woodworking Interests
    Hobby, Arts and Crafts, Shaker

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  1. Although if you pick the right woman, that isn’t an issue.
  2. I’d go with pens. A mini lathe and an easy wood tool, and a drill will get you going. You can cut the blanks with a handsaw, flatten the ends with sandpaper. A drill chuck that fits your lathe and pen chuck will make it even easier. However, depending on how complex your wedding is going to be, it’s best not to try to do too much.
  3. I do think the advice to review your pricing is actually the best. Nancy Hiller has some good posts on all the things that go into pricing work, a lot that I never would have considered. Matt Kinney also talked about this on his podcast.
  4. I don’t think it’s from freezing. They are outside, getting rained on, soaked, and then blasted by the sun for rapid drying. I don’t think there is much that will stop it or prevent it in the future. You could fill with epoxy and then refinish, but it won’t take long for the process to repeat itself. Even the “outside” woods will crack like that if exposed the weather and sun. They just don’t rot as much and resist bugs better.
  5. The Gatsby from Penn State Industries uses a 27/64 size bit. It is about the same as the Wall Street from Woodcraft. They are OK. The laser cut blanks I’ve used are fairly delicate, but you might be able to drill them out to 10.5 mm—that would give you more options. I do prefer Penn State-the blanks are already roughed up, and instructions come with each kit.
  6. I’d suggest the two sided water stones for someone starting out. A guide is very useful and there are a number of decent options out there. If you get one of the cheap “eclipse” style you might want to search out tips for improving the guide-just some file work. You can flatten your water stones with wet/dry sandpaper on a flat surface 180 or 220 grit is fine. I did that for years, but I have switched to diamond stones-less mess and I don’t have to flatten. The advice to pick a system and stay with it for a while is good advice.
  7. Just looking at the image it looks like a long unsupported section hanging out between the legs and cabinet. Are there any battens under that part. It seems like that could be part of the problem.
  8. Looks good. I have a couple of CBN wheels I need to install—as soon as I finish the chair I’m working on.
  9. I’ve never had a problem with Woodslicer blades, or anything from Highland. Any company can have an occasional defective unit. Contact them and I’m sure they will make it right.
  10. You could try the dowels you can get in a test piece, apply finish and see how it looks. End grain soaks up finish, and may darken enough to give you the look you want. Brass does look good, too.
  11. I think there won’t be a huge difference as long as the blade is sharp. I’d base the cut on the planned use and look.
  12. Shellac, dries fast and seals great. Maple or walnut would look nice, but so would cherry or mahogany. Don’t know of any examples for you.
  13. I really like the Forest WW II. No problems, cuts great and when it does get dull I send it back to get resharpened. While I have the 3hp Sawstop, I do most of my rips 8/4 and above on the bandsaw. Just feels more comfortable.
  14. I think a thicker leg is the way to go. If you align the outside of the rail so that it meets the foot “edge to edge”, no one will know that the leg extends beyond the rail on the on the inside. Once you put the mattress inside, add blankets and bedspreads the inside of the leg will be almost invisible.
  15. Thanks for the clarification. Even a backer of 1/8” ply would give a lot of support. It would still flex, but wouldn’t break.