WoodNoob

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About WoodNoob

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    General hobbiest
  1. Thanks guys. I think I'll just have to butt join the shelves in the corners of the rooms, otherwise it'll be too much of a pain to put them on the cleats/strips. Might be a crazy way of doing it, but I'm thinking about around inch thick shelves (laminating two 15mm ply) - routing out an inch deep dado in the back edge for the cleat to fit into. Solid shelf, no need to make a torsion box. Comments?
  2. Careful accurate craftmanship you say... well I can be careful... So you're suggesting a torsion box style shelf? I've seen people using pre-made doors for this purpose, but I kind of like the look of exposed edge ply for this kind of thing - But that may be too solid and heavy for what you are saying? Do I make my own ply box that has a many layer ply edge, but only thin sheet top and bottom with struts sandwiched inbetween? My second problem I've just realised, is that if I have these wrap around the walls - how do I slot them onto the strips when the shelves on adjacent walls meet in a
  3. Hi all, I'm going to be "renovating" our study and want to put in floating shelves that wrap around the perimeter. See attached pic. Well...ideally floating as I like the minimalist look, but if it's crazy, I'll go another route. What are people's preferred method of attaching to the wall? These are plasterboard/stud walls. I'm thinking of making the shelves from ply. I've considered something like screwing a thick strip to the wall, with a matching dado in the back edge of the shelf that then gets screws down through the top surface of the shelf into the strip. Make sense? Imagine
  4. I believe it would be something like 3-in-1 light machine oil. It's the kind of stuff they use for sewing machines etc. http://www.3inone.com/products/multi-purpose/
  5. I haven't used IE for years! So I think I deduce that the main issue might be the flatness of my sharpening surfaces - be that sandpaper on whatever, or a stone. That might be why I may have got my best results from diamond paste on a purpose made lapping plate. But only having one, I haven't been able to step through the grits and see what happens. I suppose sandpaper could easily be wrinkling etc. I guess I could still be rocking a little, even with the honing guide? Thanks all for the great information and videos, I've got a lot of woodworking videos queued up now!
  6. Triple H - you really deserve the "Mentor" tag you have under your name! That is a very comprehensive and helpful post! Thanks so much. In answer to your questions: mostly vintage planes I'm talking about, for an example, my main no 4 1/2 Record plane from around about 1950s-60s I think. Original iron I believe. I've been trying on a couple of other vintage planes too from various eras, but all pre 70s I would guess, up to about 100 years old. As far as chisels go, only on my pre-Irwin Marples blue handles. Tool backs: pretty sure none of them are convex, and I've managed to get close t
  7. Hi all, I've always had trouble with sharpening. I've seen loads of videos, including Mark's, and I still can't seem to get a decent edge on chisels and especially planes. I've tried a few methods. I have a basic two sided oil stone (which I see is all Paul Sellers often uses). Don't use that much anymore. I've tried sandpaper on a granite kitchen bench off cut or on top of my tablesaw table (cast iron). I've tried sand paper on glass. I've tried diamond paste on granite, MDF, hardwood, and a lapping plate. I always try flattening the backs. I usually try a micro bevel. I try with and wit
  8. I built a bench from a plan in one of the magazines (can't remember which, but there's plans and videos of it around). It's based on three layers of thick MDF laminated. So it's super flat, very cheap and easy to build. Pretty heavy though.
  9. I should clarify that is AUD in Australia, so probably not as much as it might buy in US. I will have a look at getting both though. There's a bit of a gap in the market here between the local big box store which is strictly handyman category for power tools at the cheap end, and specialist woodworking machine suppliers at the other end. There are construction industry stores which would be better than the big box store, but only for mitre saws etc, site-based stuff. For instance we don't have access to grizzly anywhere that I can see.... Just had quick look and I could get both for aroun
  10. I should clarify that is AUD in Australia, so probably not as much as it might buy in US. I will have a look at getting both though. There's a bit of a gap in the market here between the local big box store which is strictly handyman category for power tools at the cheap end, and specialist woodworking machine suppliers at the other end. There are construction industry stores which would be better than the big box store, but only for mitre saws etc, site-based stuff. For instance we don't have access to grizzly anywhere that I can see. I think it's getting better though.
  11. Budget... $10k hehehe. Nope not there yet. More like $1500. I have tacit approval for more in the future, so I'm probably looking at one machine at a time, a combo would be out of my league. A decent one anyway. I would like a bandsaw but I don't feel that's going to help me with my squaring up issues. Canadian Bear (and others) you make pretty compelling case for a planer. I think I will go that direction next. That combined with hand planes sounds and long shooting boards seems like it will allow me to joint and flatten most things. Ps yes I've gotta put my own TS on the list too!
  12. I like your idea for using the bench as a shooting board. I'm halfway through making my first shooting board at the moment, and that will be great for ends, but long edges, not so much. Everytime I try to plane a longer edge I always end up with a reasonably flat edge, but at several degrees off 90!
  13. This is a great discussion. Regarding whether it's my technique or the quality of the saw. Well, I'd never say never, but I'm pretty sure it's not me. I will clamp the work down, bring the saw down and touch the teeth to the line, front and back to check - often at this stage I have to adjust the angle a touch because it's already showing a little out. But otherwise then I'll turn it on, wait a couple of seconds, bring it down slowly and touch the line again just to make sure it hasn't shifted because of the huge jolt when it takes off. Then I'll usually cut through a 1" board or even a half
  14. Thanks! Hadn't thought of zero clearance insert for a mitre saw. I've been using sacrificial fences, but not a more permanent option like that showed.
  15. Sounds good, but I don't think we can get Craftsman in Australia.