mwatkins

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About mwatkins

  • Rank
    Apprentice Poster
  • Birthday June 14

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  • Website URL
    http://WatkinsGallery.com
  • Twitter
    @WatkinsWoodWork

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Southern Utah
  • Woodworking Interests
    Everything but I really enjoy artistic pieces and smaller catch all/accessory & Jewelry boxes.
  1. I've used basic double sided clear tape that you can get at the office supply store for similar tasks. If the stock you're using is smooth and clean on the mating surfaces you'll be fine with the clear tape. If it's still fairly rough you can't beat pressure sensitive turners tape.
  2. Very cool. I will definitely squirrel this away for a rainy day project.
  3. I used to suffer from the glusanity when pulling together dovetailed boxes. That was until I swapped to hide glue and changed my tecnique after taking a few minutes to think through my old processes. After some contemplation, I realized I was often doubling my efforts by applying glue in spaces that didn't need it and by doing so eating up time. I also arrived at a process that is now fluid and in a numerical fashion...so no more frantic glue up for me. I also swapped to titebond extend for those pieces that are really complex, again taking a few minutes to review the assembly process and plotting out the smoothest plan of attack. My life is now much more relaxed and time in the shop is no longer fraught with stress and anxiety over screwing a piece up with a bad glue up.
  4. I'm with Vic on this one. The laminated top would allow some resurfacing after it gets used and abused, not to mention the ability to get it dead flat. With the ply top you're kinda stuck in your options for re-leveling; unless you don't adhear the top sheet to the other 3 plys with glue...you'd be able to swap that piece out or flip it over after it gets beat up. After having worked with both types of tops I don't believe I'll be going back to the ply version anytime soon.
  5. I liked mineral spirits better than WD40...for me, it cut through the cosmoline better and left less of a residue.
  6. I had all but forgotten that trick. Learned it while working in a machine shop during my college years but never thought to dig it out since. Thanks for the reminder and a great article.
  7. I have to disagree with the prior statements that the combo machines don't have any real benifits to offer or are less quality. I think the fact that for far less than the cost of stand alone pieces, you often can gain far greater stock capacities within your jointer. Another huge benifit is the ability to retain both pieces of machinery in a single foot print. Most guys only think of this in the means of where the equipment is currently sitting...but you also have to take into account the working space needed to feed/recieve stock in and out of it. So being able to cut that space in half is HUGE. Also the negativity around swapping between jointer to planer etc. is completly bogus and way "old school" thinking. Having grown up in a cabinet shop with stand alone pieces I was hesitant on buying a combo machine, but now that I have, I don't believe I'll be purchasing separates at anytime in the future. If you're in a true cabinet/furntiure shop that's always running in production mode with deadlines breathing down your neck then yes...the costs of stand alone are probably warranted. But in this case the advantages of being able to pick up a 10" or 12" jointer with spiral head cutter far, far out weight that extra 45 seconds that it takes to flip the jointer beds up or down. The $2500 bucks I spent on a Grizzly G0634XP is by far the best investment I've made in my shop, hands down. At this point I have easily run 3K feet of hardwood across it (in both directions so in reality more like 6K feet) and it has yet to flinch. And before anyone jumps in to poo poo the hardwood statement, I'm talking hard maple, walnut, cherry, bubinga, wenge, bocote, zebra, etc. and I have yet to make an adjustment to the beds, fence or carbide inserts. So my advice is that you can't go wrong with the G0634XP. But as with any tool purchase it's all personal...ultimately my point is that for whatever reason, we in the US are soooooo against combo machines for little to no reason other than the "2 is always better than 1" mentality. My recommendation is to put in a little leg work and get hands on. Find some local shops, guilds, hobbiests etc. and see if you can get a few minutes with the pieces they're using and find what you like and don't...and then make your decsion.
  8. I've never used or in my opinion needed them. I've been using my 16-32 for years without it and have never had an issue; even when running longer stock for tall face frames etc. The 22-44 that I worked with back in the cabinet shop days didn't have them either and we never had a problem. I think it all comes down to how you use the machine. If you pay attention to your loading and unloading of the stock off the feed belt you'll be fine. For me the extra bit of attention needed to keep pieces flat as they enter and exit the drum is not worth the extra costs of the tables...let alone the hassle of having to make sure they're always coplaner with the feed belt.
  9. Not a bad little box and even better is that you made it with a very limited tool base. Just more proof that it comes down as much to desire to make something vs. the tools to do it. There's always a way when there's a will do to something. Way to go.
  10. Forgot one other thing...silica dust is extremely bad for you. Like most wood dust, glass dust, when it's freshly sanded has extremely sharp/jagged corners that don't play nice with the lungs. When you're sanding, be sure to wear at least a dust mask if not something better like a respirator.
  11. I would try what the glass industry calls "art glass" rather than blown. Find someone in the community that does stained glass windows (local glass shops should be able to point you in the right direction) and pick up some pieces from them. In my experience art glass has a solid coloring through and through. Also keep in mind that glass is really nothing more than melted sand. As such when you crush it it's not really going to take a shine or polish. If you can keep the pieces big enough you should be able to sand through a variety of grits (up to 1K) to bring back its shine/glass appearance.
  12. If a slow set glue and some cauls as suggested by hhh isn't in the picture I'd run with splines along each piece. Cut them from some of your scrap out of the same stock being used for the top, glue them in and bob's your uncle.
  13. You sir are a genius. I have a lathe that sits idle for the majority of a the year and I've been thinking about buying a large floor stand disc sander. Why not combine them??? I think I'm going to be taking your genius and applying it in the shop with my own home made version. Thank you for the inspiration.
  14. I don't take it easy on the steel wool. I do however start the finishing process after sanding to 150 grit, from there moving to successive coats of finish with a sadning of finer and finer grit inbetween. Once I get to the steel wool I'm at least 3 coats of wiping varnish in. I'm also a fan of the apply a tad heavy, let sit/soak for a few minutes and then wipe dry process. Once I get to that 3rd coat or so the medium grade steel wool is pretty much doing nothing more than burnishing the surface. I'm sure if I really wanted to get into it I could remove material, but I honestly don't give it much thought and I don't pay that much attention so I would say it's safe to say that I'm not going at it with kid gloves. Ultimately each coat sits a minimum of 24 hours before moving to the next grit & application of finish. Typically I'm adding 3-4 coats of wiping varnish and 2-3 applications of wax. This isn't going to give you that wet shine/polished look, but will give you a piece that is a dream to touch.
  15. I use a wiping varnish on all my pieces sanding in between each coat with successive grits to about 600 and then finish with a couple coats of wax that are then buffed with 00 steel wool and then 0000 as the final. Gives a smooth as satin finish that's easy to repair if ever needed (but honestly I've yet to ever have to repair one)