Cochese

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About Cochese

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  1. Legit jealous of anyone who has room in their shop to break down full sheets of ply on their floor. I have a Centipede XL, which except for my yard not being level works pretty well. Either a couple 2x4s or a thinner sheet of pink foam board does the job. I was thinking about building a table out of PT that would offset the pitch in the yard, or just waiting until I can do a patio for my new shop.
  2. I don't know if I'd buy one, but I'm all for new ideas.
  3. Man, I will never ever be that productive.
  4. Glad I could finally give something back to some people. As such, I'll leave it up. Goodbye.
  5. 20% off the clamps isn't worth getting out of bed over. Meh.
  6. What you just posted is why I picked the Trion over the Carvex. In most instances, if I'm a blade width or two off my cut line, it's not a big deal. But, if I need to be right on that line I have two options: remove the shroud and deal with a bit of dust, or cut from the bottom. There's actually a third option, which is to cut a viewing window in the shroud. I picked up a spare for $3 to experiment with.
  7. I thought for years I'd buy a Bosch, specifically the two latest ones in the $120-$150 range. But when push came to shove I spent a bit more and got the Trion. Is it overkill for my intended uses? Yes. It feels good, works well, and is an upgrade over my very ergonomic and innovative scroll/jigsaw. This one cuts perpendicular. Like I mentioned earlier, the Plug-It did it for me, along a couple other features. It takes a bit more effort to keep it on the line, but I figured it out.
  8. I might buy a pair of clamps (because I'd be shocked if they weren't on sale somewhere), but that's probably about it. A couple video games, some gifts for others. I'm at a point of saturation where I don't really need anything.
  9. That's what the voices tell me anyway.
  10. I must be more sane than most, because the drills don't seem like value at all. For me the Festool system starts and ends with the plug-it. Outside of that I'd just assume look at alternatives.
  11. It's not good enough of a sander to get in a tizzy over. Only my opinion, naturally.
  12. I've not used the flat wheel that corresponds to the heavy duty version. I use the medium duty rounder, darker red wheel. Works fine for my applications. 220lbs per wheel is a lot. I wonder how much better, if there is a difference, the brake works on the flatter wheel. No complaints though.
  13. So, a followup. Figure here was as good as my cabinet thread. I'm in general agreement with Eric on a 6" vs 5" sander, particularly with the two Festool sanders in particular. That said, I did enjoy using this vertically and upside down more than the ETS. I appreciated the inclusion of the bumper, which allowed me to sand right up to some obstacles. It's still a sander that I'm not sure I'd buy at more than $100, particularly with the ETS on hand.
  14. Best advice I can give is to take everything out that does not have a home. Put back things that you then make a home for. Trash the remainder. Easier said than done, but a clear space works as well as a clear mind.
  15. Whatcha been watching in the bottom left there?