Dan S

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About Dan S

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    Journeyman Poster

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    http://www.dans-hobbies.com/

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central IL
  • Woodworking Interests
    Solid wood Furniture

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  1. Do you have contact information for any of them?
  2. I just cover the console with some old towles I keep in the back, and then run the wood up the middle. In my Murano I can just about fit an 8 footer. Imo, anything longer than a 10 footer is difficult to deal with unless you have a large shop. if you need to pick up a lot of wood, and it's not super far away go to Home Depot, or one of the other big boxes, and rent their truck for $20. If you need to pick up a crap ton of lumber, consider renting a small uhaul. They can be had for $20 a day plus like $0.60 a mile.
  3. You wake up on the wrong side of the bed or something, I don't think I have seen a single person state otherwise?
  4. Face grain boards are usually made from fewer wide boards and are thus more prone to cupping & bow. Edge grain boards are usually maid from a larger number of narrower boards stood on edge and are thus less prone to the movement issues seen in face grain boards.
  5. I haven't sold them at markets, but I have made and sold more than i care to think about. End grain are the best looking and longest lasting. They take the most time to produce though, and are thus the most expensive unless you have the right tools for the job (drum sander). Face grain is the easiest to produce because they can be made from just 2 or 3 boards, and thus can be made cheaply. Depending on the species you chose, they can be very pretty. I have made several face grain boards that have ended up as nothing more than kitchen decorations. The only negative about face grain is that they are the least durable. The most popular boards I have made, have been edge grain boards. They are easy enough to produce that I can sell them for a price that most consumers consider reasonable, while still making a good hourly rate.
  6. an 8" slow speed grinder with a cbn wheel for rough work and then miscellaneous stones for honing. You will be hard pressed to get a super sharp edge without some stones and or a strop.
  7. I made this Thein/HF combo almost 8 years ago, and it works really well at catching everything but the finest particles. If memory serves, I'm in my second motor, and I've replaced a bearing or 2 over the years. it won't compete with a multiple HP unit, but considering i only paid ~$100, I've more than got my money out of it. http://www.dans-hobbies.com/2008/07/12/shop-made-dust-collector/ I helped my dad make a Thein for his 2HP jet, and he loves it.
  8. Again Larry, Ellison would disagree with that!
  9. I think it depends on the size of your boat. This is Larry Ellison's boat, doesn't even crack the top 10 anymore. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rising_Sun_(yacht)
  10. Buy the fully machines ones, and then do the cooked oil trick to them. http://benchcrafted.blogspot.com/2011/09/omega-3-fatty-acid-for-your-cast-iron.html http://benchcrafted.blogspot.com/2011/10/i-cooked-my-vises.html or blue them. http://benchcrafted.blogspot.com/2012/07/cold-bluing-handwheels.html
  11. I'd go with B-421, because like others said it will reflect more light.
  12. There isn't anything wrong with the 5 cut method! Stuff like saw dust can throw off any method, 5 cut, square, anything else someone can think of. Care must be taken when performing the test, just like it should when you are doing any other finicky task where accuracy matters. You don't even need special tools to use the 5 cut method, a $10 set of feeler gauges from the local hardware store will get you within 0.002"/ft. If someone is familiar with the procedure, it will most likely take 2 tries. The first pass is so a measurement can be taken to see how far out the sled is, and the second is to verify the results after a correction is made.
  13. My sled was square to 0.0005" when it was built, but that's mainly because machining is another hobby of mine, and thus my tool set is a little more diverse.
  14. One more vote for the 735. The stock blades don't last that long, but they are cheap ($50) to replace, or than can be easily upgraded. You can even buy a bird head for it if you want.
  15. I think you need to look at it slightly differently. It's not so much that he has become famous, but that he has become a professional. Now that people are paying him, he produces less content, but he puts a lot more effort into the content he produces.