ChetlovesMer

Do you need your tools to "match"?

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13 hours ago, Tpt life said:

Snarky comment alert:  Does SawStop make jointers? :D

Only on alternate Thursdays of the sixth week of February.:ph34r:

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18 minutes ago, RichardA said:

Only on alternate Thursdays of the sixth week of February.:ph34r:

 

I thought it was the second Tuesday of next week.

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1 hour ago, I B said:

 

I thought it was the second Tuesday of next week.

I may well be projecting.  I'm not sure i understand all I know about the subject.

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17 hours ago, Mark J said:

Nonsense.  Just throw a sheet of cardboard on top and you're good to go.  You gotta understand how to layer! :rolleyes:

This belongs as the inaugural post in the to be created  Shop Hacks sub. 

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On 3/25/2013 at 2:12 PM, duckkisser said:

if i had a billion dollers i would just buy all powermatic and festool so i have the best and they match but that ant going to happen.  so i just looks for the good deal and pick it up.  seems like the people who match their tools and have a great shop spend more time seting up a shop then they do making things.  i would rather make things so i balance between workig on shop and making projects.

If I had a billion dollars, I wouldn't be buying tools and working in a shop. I'd be gone in a big pickup and camper. Then tell everyone I don't know when I'll be back.

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4 hours ago, Bankstick said:

If I had a billion dollars, I wouldn't be buying tools and working in a shop. I'd be gone in a big pickup and camper. Then tell everyone I don't know when I'll be back.

Love it.  No big jet, no big mansion on the waterfront, but a big pickup and a camper.

You might get by for less than a billion with those aspirations!

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On 3/25/2013 at 1:10 PM, thewoodwhisperer said:

... Japanese chisels sitting next to a set of western chisels looks a little odd.... 

I guess I'm just not as discriminating in my tastes; really don't much care how it looks if it does the job.

.

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Ok... I have to admit that  I kind of like my tools to match.   Not so much in looks, but quality.

So I get rid of low quality tools even though I may not use them much just because they cannot give me joy.

 

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After being involved in numerous woodworking groups, I have come to a realization.  Woodworkers can often be divided into 3 categories:

  1. Woodworkers - these people work the craft and complete projects
  2. Wood Hoarders - collect wood but rarely do any woodworking projects
  3. Tool Collectors - collect tools but rarely do any woodworking projects

People seem to be divided pretty evenly in these camps - a third in each.  I have received the most beautiful and needed wood from people in the second group.  I have been on fascinating shop tours of people in the third group.  Nothing wrong with any of them.  Some of the most matchy-matchy woodworkers might secretly be type 3 folks (the ultimate of which are the antique tool collectors).

 

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7 hours ago, SeventyFix said:

After being involved in numerous woodworking groups, I have come to a realization.  Woodworkers can often be divided into 3 categories:

  1. Woodworkers - these people work the craft and complete projects
  2. Wood Hoarders - collect wood but rarely do any woodworking projects
  3. Tool Collectors - collect tools but rarely do any woodworking projects

People seem to be divided pretty evenly in these camps - a third in each.  I have received the most beautiful and needed wood from people in the second group.  I have been on fascinating shop tours of people in the third group.  Nothing wrong with any of them.  Some of the most matchy-matchy woodworkers might secretly be type 3 folks (the ultimate of which are the antique tool collectors).

 

I think you are on to something here but would add you can go from one to the other as well. I seemed to work on getting my shop setup for years now I really prefer projects like furniture etc.

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I went from 1 to 3 very quickly recently. Asbestos in the house killed my budget. I need to chase 2 to get back to 1. 

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9 hours ago, SeventyFix said:

After being involved in numerous woodworking groups, I have come to a realization.  Woodworkers can often be divided into 3 categories:

  1. Woodworkers - these people work the craft and complete projects
  2. Wood Hoarders - collect wood but rarely do any woodworking projects
  3. Tool Collectors - collect tools but rarely do any woodworking projects

People seem to be divided pretty evenly in these camps - a third in each.  I have received the most beautiful and needed wood from people in the second group.  I have been on fascinating shop tours of people in the third group.  Nothing wrong with any of them.  Some of the most matchy-matchy woodworkers might secretly be type 3 folks (the ultimate of which are the antique tool collectors).

 

I don’t feel that these are equally divided. #1 is probably the greatest percent by far, at least from what I see on here. 

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14 hours ago, pkinneb said:

I think you are on to something here but would add you can go from one to the other as well. I seemed to work on getting my shop setup for years now I really prefer projects like furniture etc.

With your current project you are firmly in #3 zone :P.

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19 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

With your current project you are firmly in #3 zone :P.

I know and it’s getting old really fast....9 sheets of drywall hung 90 to go...

 

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35 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

I know and it’s getting old really fast....9 sheets of drywall hung 90 to go...

 

Ick i'm hoping that i can motivate a contractor to do my garage...... i really don't want to hang sheets 11' in the air.

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@Chestnut that's what sheetrock lifts are for I rented one for my 36x36 shop and hung 4x12 5/8" sheetrock ceiling by myself the hardest part was getting the rock onto the lift the lift takes all the fight out of it then it's just screwing the hell out of it. I had 10' ceilings, you can also use the lift to hang the walls they are pretty reasonable to rent I think I just rented one for a week as I was hanging the ceiling for several hours after work and finished it up on the weekend.

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12 minutes ago, higtron said:

@Chestnut that's what sheetrock lifts are for I rented one for my 36x36 shop and hung 4x12 5/8" sheetrock ceiling by myself the hardest part was getting the rock onto the lift the lift takes all the fight out of it then it's just screwing the hell out of it. I had 10' ceilings, you can also use the lift to hang the walls they are pretty reasonable to rent I think I just rented one for a week as I was hanging the ceiling for several hours after work and finished it up on the weekend.

Every additional foot over 8' makes me that much more uncomfortable. I was also hoping to get them do do the initial taping and mudding. I can do it i just don't want to. Also the lifts are only like $150 to buy i was just going to see if i could grab one used or buy one and then sell it when i was done. I don't know much much a rental is but i'll look into it when i get down to it.

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Taping and floating use to be a challenge, then I found a guy that does that for a living, and a whole lot quicker and better than I thought I could. 

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On 1/27/2019 at 11:08 AM, Mick S said:

 

I think I've been guilty of all three at one point or another in my woodworking life. I've known people who fell firmly into one camp or another, particularly the latter. Sometimes when I'm introduced to a really nice maker line I'll find myself coveting the whole line. I did that when Bridge City first came out. Today, it doesn't matter to me much.  Quality, feel and performance are most important now.

One of the finest craftsmen I know is a fellow instructor at SFCC - Ivan Dimitrov. If you could see his collection of carving tools you would understand why SeventyFix hit the nail on the head. Swiss Made? Check. 3 Cherries? Check. Auriou, Hirsch, Flexcut? Check, check, check. Ground down screwdrivers and files? Check. Anything that gets the job done.

 

At some basic level, I would suspect that most of us are guilty of all 3.

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On 1/26/2019 at 9:15 PM, K Cooper said:

I don’t feel that these are equally divided. #1 is probably the greatest percent by far, at least from what I see on here. 

Agreed - but "on here" does not represent "out there".  Look at the price of tools on Ebay.  You used to be able to pick up fixer-upers for very little.  Now they're sought after "collectibles".  Guys are buying, refurbishing and reselling old tools like never before.  And the quality of the woods available online is amazing.  Pictures abound.  Everything that was once rare is now commonplace.  Not to say that this is a bad thing.  I don't disrespect anyone for their passion or drive to turn a hobby into a business.  Some of these woods are to die for.  Some of these restored antique tools are so inviting.  To think that you are producing silky smooth shavings with a plane that was used for generations is really cool.

But, alas, I suck at hand planes and struggle with quality from Lie-Nielsen.  I really owe Thomas Lie-Nielsen an apology.

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I'm currently in the "Tool Collector" phase as I am gearing up to actually build my garage workshop the way I want.  At some point I will transition more to the "Woodworker" phase, hopefully.

I see pluses and minuses to matching tools.  One one hand, it can be aesthetically pleasing to have a roomful of stationary tools that are the same color and brand, and it can make service and support easier, especially if you purchase from the same dealer.  On the other hand, there are fewer manufacturers that offer a complete line of machines, and by selecting a single vendor you may be limiting yourself to tools that aren't necessarily ideal for your situation.  It can also exclude certain specialty vendors, such as Sawstop.

To each his own.  If I had the funds and the shop space, I'd have a bunch of SCM or Felder machines, most likely.  I'd also have some Festool equipment, but I'd keep my Dewalt 20V and Flexvolt tools, as I'm really happy with them.

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On 1/26/2019 at 11:59 AM, SeventyFix said:

After being involved in numerous woodworking groups, I have come to a realization.  Woodworkers can often be divided into 3 categories:

  1. Woodworkers - these people work the craft and complete projects
  2. Wood Hoarders - collect wood but rarely do any woodworking projects
  3. Tool Collectors - collect tools but rarely do any woodworking projects

People seem to be divided pretty evenly in these camps - a third in each.  I have received the most beautiful and needed wood from people in the second group.  I have been on fascinating shop tours of people in the third group.  Nothing wrong with any of them.  Some of the most matchy-matchy woodworkers might secretly be type 3 folks (the ultimate of which are the antique tool collectors).

 

At this point in time, I would consider myself in the “woodworker” category. I decided to get serious about woodworking about 2 years ago. With a limited budget to work with I purchased just the bare minimum of tools that I needed. Ridgid table saw, Ridgid bench top planer and a Ridgid ROS sander. Now this would appear that I prefer matching tools but that is not the case here.

Being limited on funds, the Ridgid line of tools are of decent quality for the price point. I was able to get a new table saw, planer and sander for under $1000.00 with lifetime warranty. I had some back saws, Marple chisels and bench plane that I inherited after my dad passed. I used just these tools for my first 2 projects and they turned out fairly well but I quickly realized that I needed more and higher quality tools.

I have since purchased a Laguna bandsaw to replace an old jigsaw and a Powermatic 6” jointer to replace the planer sled. Upgraded the honing guide from a $10 pos  to a MK II and now in the market to upgrade chisels, planes and other various tooling. The more I advance my skills the more I appreciate quality tools.

This may put me into a sub category of Woodworker. Transitioning from beginner to mid level woodworker. I’m not collecting tools just to have them, I use every tool I own but I am acquiring higher quality tools to replace the lower quality ones. I don’t really favor any particular brand but there seems to be only a hand full of companies that produce quality tools. 

 

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