Which oil for planes?


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I have used orange oil a bit (i use it on my oboe to help expel all the drool) my tools smell nice and orangey. Im not sure if its acidic or could affect the metal i should probably check its ph.

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I'm just cracking up at 54 posts on oil for planes. Don't take my grins wrong I respect the dialog. But really? It's oil. Not space station grade lubricant, just slap on some and get to work! Mor

==>Camellia oil If folks want to use WD-40, have at it… However, many experienced craftsman prefer natural vegetable oils… Camellia oil is a good place to start...   ==>Which metal bits shoul

Hi MM,

 

FWIW I have enjoyed all the contributions on this thread, yours and Johns. I had not picked up anything harsh, just contrasting advice. Even with all the advice 3 in 1 is good for me. Trust me this is a nice place with nice people, that why I like this forum and I have found other forums a bit heavy.

 

 

I agree GS - I've followed a dozen or more forums of varrying subjects over the last 15 years and this is definitely one of the "nicer" ones. I've also been following Matt's and Marc's podcasts since their beginnings and have participated with both the chat and this forum since they were conceived. However, the problem with forums - including this one - is that anyone can post anything without any accountability. So, you have to rely on the integrity of the posters to give advice based on their own knowledge and experiences. It's a typical problem when someone not just offers advice, but attempts to discredit other posts without any experience or facts to back it up. I may have opinions or suspect that some practice might not be valid, but if I have never tried it I personally feel that it's not my place to say anything about it. I simply have no facts or experience to back up my objection, so who am I to say it's wrong.

 

I've read some of John's other posts and it seems like he has a lot to offer, but I question anyone who would attempt to discredit another poster's advice with admittedly no experience in the matter. There were a number of suggestions posted and they are all valid. I've never tried 3&1, mineral, baby, orange, and linseed oils as well as transmission fluid, so I would never dream of saying anything contrary to their use. It's just not my place. Now, if someone said to use grape jelly and I had tried grape jelly before and had problems with it, then I might say "be careful, I had this problem with grape jelly but maybe I wasn't using it correctly" or something along those lines. It's just being respectful to the poster and being honest about your own experience.

 

Sorry Dean for hijacking your post. good luck with your planes ;)

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I have used mineral oil in the past and it does work but I didn't like it because it left such an oily residue. With the Camelia oil it protects it but it's not greasy oily like it is with mineral oil. With the mineral oil it would even steam the shelf that the plane would sit on!

 

At least your planes will stay regular :D

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So, you've never used it and have no experience with olive oil going rancid on your tools, yet you spend 3 posts discrediting my advice? You know, the problem with forums is the lack of integrity of the posters. You just illustrated that point, John.

 

 

It seems I have. It was not my intention to discredit, but I didn't need to feed what seems to be an urban legend.

 

Note: Rancid olive oil is okay to use as a lubricant, rust repellent on tools and even on oil stones.

 

Blessings. 

 

Thank you for that. I had been hoping you'd add some pearl of wisdom, being a chemist and all. I shall not need to worry myself or others needlessly about this again.

 

Blessings to you too.

 

John

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That is very interesting, but I would be cautious about oils that rapidly absorb into the body, they can carry toxins along with them... kinda like DMSO.

 

Jojoba oil is used as massage oil, and in other beauty products (my wife thought it was funny I brought home a bottle of it)  If the oil is clean and free from contaminants there is relatively low risk of absorbing toxins into the body.

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Fine Woodworking did a test last year of something like 20 different things for rust prevention.  It was a fairly short test on a couple of bare metals, but the results were still pretty impressive.  CRC 3-36 came out on top by a long shot, for not only rust prevention, but not affecting woods ability to take any kind of finish.  I had been using Camelia oil, but it never was up to my expectations.  I couldn't find 3.36 in a store anywhere, so I ordered some online.  It's an aerosol, which is not my ideal, but a little goes a long way, and anything I've put it on has not rusted.  I use it on handsaws, all parts of metal planes, chisels, and even some masonry and stonework tools that are just left in a canvas tool bag. 

 

I don't have any reason to use anything else.  I don't remember anything I sprayed Camelia oil on in a long time since I bought the 3.36.

 

If you live in a large town with a good hardware store, they might have it.  Shipping is kind of high.  Here's what it looks like:

http://www.amazon.com/CRC-Technical-Multi-Purpose-Precision-Lubricant/dp/B000X4YCMA/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1372186143&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=crc+3-36

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Another vote for olive oil, this time on saws

 

"He also told us that all that remained to be done to complete the saw was to set and sharpen it, and then fasten the handle on by means of steel or brass screws, and to have the saw rubbed by hand with emery, in order to impart to it a superficial polish, and then to rub the saw with a cloth dipped in olive oil to prevent its getting rusty. We withdrew, very much pleased with our visit, after heartily thanking our kind conductor.

The Ironmonger – (London) 1871"

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In Ye Olden Roman Times (and ye older Greek Times), olive oil was used as lubrication for just about everything.  I'd imagine the purity plays a part, but not being chemically minded or possessing larger amounts of (working) planes, I haven't attempted to test the theory yet.  

 

I do have a small wick that is to be used for burning olive oil as an emergency lamp, and the instructions provided a variety of oils that could be used. The biggest reason they stated that they use olive oil was the smell when burning was the most pleasant.  There was no noticeable other reason for using olive oil over other oils. I'd think this points to the ability for olive oil to be used as a substitute for other oils when needed.

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I use Camila Oil, applied with a wick bottle dispenser, so a little goes a very long way.  I just wipe all the shiny parts of my planes at the end of a working day...never had any sort of problem, though I've heard of friends with 'rusty fingers' who have really big issues in keeping shiny stuff shiny - Rob 

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+1 for WD40.

.... I used WD40 previously, but it's expensive and evapourates rapidly...

John according to the WD40 site, I checked some time ago concerned about it evaporating...

How long does WD-40 Multi-Use Product last after application?

While this may vary depending on the application, WD-40 Multi-Use Product remains effective even after it appears to dry. The corrosion and rust protection ingredients remain adhered to the surface. External conditions may, of course, require additional applications of the product for maximum protection.

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John according to the WD40 site, I checked some time ago concerned about it evaporating...

How long does WD-40 Multi-Use Product last after application?

While this may vary depending on the application, WD-40 Multi-Use Product remains effective even after it appears to dry. The corrosion and rust protection ingredients remain adhered to the surface. External conditions may, of course, require additional applications of the product for maximum protection.

Doesn't seem I can get anything right in this thread. So perhaps instead of oils, I should switch to a wax?  <_< 

 

John

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Doesn't seem I can get anything right in this thread. So perhaps instead of oils, I should switch to a wax?  <_< 

 

John

No reason you can't use both. Quick wipe down with WD40, than wax.

I clean my hand tools with wd40 and 0000 steel wool, apply a coat of TopCote, and then wax em with paste wax. Of course, I don't do this nearly often enough, but it's a good combo. I use the same procedure for my cast iron machine tops.

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Voracity-Their claims are accurate. In my former life we sprayed bathroom partitions with WD-40 and let them drip dry. They maintained graffiti repellant properties 12 months before being stripped and recoated. What some do not appreciate is how WD breaks down with heat.

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Voracity-Their claims are accurate. In my former life we sprayed bathroom partitions with WD-40 and let them drip dry. They maintained graffiti repellant properties 12 months before being stripped and recoated. What some do not appreciate is how WD breaks down with heat.

Didnt know this about heat and wd40. Can you elaborate a bit? Does it have relevance for woodworkers, or is it extreme heat?

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I am not sure if it matters. You are not likely to see rust on the sole of a plane you are using. If you like WD, I would not hesitate to try it. If you store the plane hit the sole once. If you are using it you could find something else if you notice trouble.

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I would be at least a little concerned about residue from the WD40 transferring to the work piece.  In my shop, at least, WD40 seems to end up dark as well as I'm not sure I want the oils on my wood.

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