dsaracini

HELP!!! (with changing jointer knives)

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I couple of months back I bought a old model Delta DJ-20 jointer off of Craigslist.  I bought some new knives for it, and I'm just now getting around to changing them out.  The problem?  It has 3 knives and 4 screws holding each of them.  The *last* screw on the *last* blade is stuck and seems to be rounded over.  I've check the other screw heads and they are all *approximately* 10mm (they range from 9.82mm to 9.98mm - lovely quality). 

 

This one seems to be around 9.8ish and probably over the years has gotten rounded over by slightly loose wrenches and over tightening.  Now, it won't budge and it seems to be completely rounded (where I can get a wrench to it).  I don't have another wrench that will fit over it, and I don't have enough strength to get to break loose with a pair of needle nose pliers.  And has you can imaging, it's really hard to get in there.  It's not like you can get something over the top of it like a grip tite socket.  And it's a very narrow gap, so you can't get a big beef pair of vice grip pliers over it.

 

So, what the do I do now?  saw it off?  I don't think I could get a hack saw in there.  Maybe a oscillating multi tool ???

 

And assuming I can saw it off, then wait the 6 mos to a year for Delta parts department to send me a new one (assuming they have one in stock - which if you've tried to order something off of delta lately you know that you are probably more likely to win the lottery).  I guess it could try and file it down to get a smaller wrench on it, but it would take forever because you would have to take tiny little strokes.

 

 

 

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The best way is to remove the head -- I did this on a friends machine...  it takes about 2 hrs total to remove, clean (or replace), install and adjust the head on a Delta DJ-20.  About 90 minutes if you've done it before.  That way you can get to the bolts properly and avoid risk doing something really bad....  I would replace any bolts that are even slightly rounded-over to avoid this problem in the future.  Of course, if you have an 'extra' $500, you could install a shelix head :)

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The best way is to remove the head -- I did this on a friends machine...  it takes about 2 hrs total to remove, clean (or replace), install and adjust the head on a Delta DJ-20.  About 90 minutes if you've done it before.  That way you can get to the bolts properly and avoid risk doing something really bad....  I would replace any bolts that are even slightly rounded-over to avoid this problem in the future.  Of course, if you have an 'extra' $500, you could install a shelix head :)

 

I'm not sure how removing the head would help me?  I still couldn't get a wrench on it.  Might make sawing it off easier.  Am I missing your point (note: this happens quite often).

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What about using a screw extractor set (Graingers for $25).  You're going to scrap the bolt anyway.

This option seems so simple to me which tells me I'm not understanding the problem clearly.

 

Hopefully Delta uses typical sized bolts so you don't have to rely on Delta and specialized bolts!

I'll have to keep this in mind when I shop for my used jointer.

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What about using a screw extractor set (Graingers for $25).  You're going to scrap the bolt anyway.

This option seems so simple to me which tells me I'm not understanding the problem clearly.

 

Hopefully Delta uses typical sized bolts so you don't have to rely on Delta and specialized bolts!

I'll have to keep this in mind when I shop for my used jointer.

 

Thanks for the reply.  Well, one of us is not getting it, I'm not sure if it's me or you.  The problem with is that you can't get to the top of the bolt.  You only have access to the side of it.  Just enough to get a wrench in their and turn it a 1/2 crank or so.  You can't get a socket on top of it, or anything else.  And it's really tight in there.

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handrail-bolt.jpg

 

 

Hit the nut with screwdriver blade or nail punch  ;)

 

Yeah, I did a bit of google and sort of figured out what he might by trying to get a chisel on a corner and get it to break loose that way.  But, no luck so far. 

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Just use a small chisel and hammer to spin the bolts. Go someplace like fastenal to get new bolts.

 

Thanks for the suggestion.  I've gotten a cheap "beater" chisel after it.  No luck so far.  I've sprayed it with some WD40, etc.  But, no luck getting it to break loose yet. 

 

Don't suppose you have another idea?  :)

 

Thanks again for the suggestion.

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Drill the biggest hole you can into the side of the bolt head , stick an appropriate size hardened steel rod in the hole and now you will have some leverage to break it free , a bit of heat on it might help as well ...

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==> I'm not sure how removing the head would help me? 

 

I must not understand the issue -- from memory of the job I did on the 20 -- it was a while ago -- and getting to the furthest nut on the head is tight because of the proximity to the fence.   I just seem to remember that it's tight and would hamper solutions involving extractors/etc would...  Can you post a photo?

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==> I'm not sure how removing the head would help me? 

 

I must not understand the issue -- from memory of the job I did on the 20 -- it was a while ago -- and getting to the furthest nut on the head is tight because of the proximity to the fence.   I just seem to remember that it's tight and would hamper solutions involving extractors/etc would...  Can you post a photo?

 

Your memory serves you well.  Depending on the rotation of the head of the gib screw, it can be tight against the fence - However, I took the fence off.  So, there is nothing blocking now.  I will post a couple of pictures shortly.

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Have you tried a 3/8" in wrench? 3/8 is slightly smaller than a 10mm and might be able to grab the sides enough to get it. Snap on flank drive are the best the grab the sides not the corners. Otherwise the needle nose vice grips of a small narrow pair. The only other thing would be if you can get a small pair of channel locks in and orient them so they get tighter as you turn them.I realize space is an issue just throwing a few things out to try before the welder option is a last resort. Good luck

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Thanks for the suggestion.  I've gotten a cheap "beater" chisel after it.  No luck so far.  I've sprayed it with some WD40, etc.  But, no luck getting it to break loose yet. 

 

Don't suppose you have another idea?  :)

 

Thanks again for the suggestion.

Bigger hammer!

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Here are a couple of pictures.  In one of them, I give a close up.  You can see the edge is rounded over - you can also see the gouges left by the chisel and hammer.  So far, nothing has moved it.  Also, I give a picture a little further back so you can see that I have removed the fence.  Also, you can see my wrench and a pair of long-nosed locking pliers that I tried. No luck with them either.  While they are pretty thin, they are still a little fat to get very far down and I just don't seem to be able to get enough of a grip on the head.
 

 

post-5188-0-19776100-1367965105_thumb.jp

post-5188-0-53189200-1367965119_thumb.jp

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Wrap a rubber band around the head to give you some extra grip.

It's the same as using a rubber pad to open a jar you can't open.

Like a broccoli band.  You can always trim it down if you need to.

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Keep going with the chisel even if you knock the head all the way off. Once you get the blade out there should be room to get a real pair of vise grips in there. Needle nose are to flexible.

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Keep going with the chisel even if you knock the head all the way off. Once you get the blade out there should be room to get a real pair of vise grips in there. Needle nose are to flexible.

 

 

Yea, you might as well use a Dremel, cutter wheel then.

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Keep going with the chisel even if you knock the head all the way off. Once you get the blade out there should be room to get a real pair of vise grips in there. Needle nose are to flexible.

 

SUCCESS!!!!!!!!  You were right!  I finally got a good sharp chisel after it - an older 1/4" Marbles.  While not a really fine chisel, I had it very sharp and was able to carve a notch in the head (note: it is no longer sharp - lol).  Then got a flat head screw driver in the notch I created and a couple of pretty hard wacks with a framing hammer and it broke free.  Just in case anyone else ever has this problem, here are the pics of the head of the gib screw and my poor chisel.

post-5188-0-79455200-1367967082_thumb.jp

post-5188-0-81762200-1367967091_thumb.jp

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Ah very nice, now I see the reason for the chisel instead of a screwdriver, I'll have to remember that!

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I have a 37-600 Rockwell jointer, since I inherited it from my brother, I have tried to change the blades. when I got it, it didn't come with the 37-522 wrench to loosen the bolts. The gap to get to the bolt is real thin, less that 1/8th "  Anyone have any idea were I could get one? Or what size it is?

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It might need 3/32" thick knives, instead of 1/8" thick ones, which are more normal these days.   I have an 8" jointer, of about that vintage.  Before I knew any better (long before there was an internet), I replaced the knives with 1/8" thick ones.  I ground down a wrench to fit in there.  You can do that, but you  have to be very careful not to ruin the temper in the wrench, or it will open up when you try to use it-no need to ask how I know that.

If indeed it is one that originally used 3/32" knives, a regular wrench will just barely fit in there with the thinner knives, or at least, you don't have to grind much off.

There is no appreciable difference in how the machine runs with either thickness of knives.  Woodworkers Supply sells the thin knives, or you can probably get some new ones on ebay.

edited to add:   no trouble finding them on ebay with free shipping.   Just type     3/32" 6" jointer knives   in the ebay search box, and many come up.

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