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Recently completed, a Japanese Floor Lamp in American Cherry and Brazilian Walnut.  An overall shot of the lamp:

 

DSC_0001-22_zps84f8d664.jpg

 

...and a pic of the wooden 'box' at the base, there to give a little visual 'weight':

 

DSC_0001-22_zpsfc383646.jpg

 

...with the six way joints at the top, one on each corner:

 

DSC_0002-18_zps5e14e90e.jpg

 

Shoji panels from 7x7mm cherry with traditional Japanese shoji paper.  All parts of the framework of the lamp are 22mm square - Rob

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Looks great, very good job on making it. "six way joints" I will have to Google how that is made.

 

I got a laugh from Japanese, American, Brazilian and You're in the U.K., if you sell it to someone in say Zambia You will finish the trip round the world. haha

 

Question how tall is it?

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Looks great, very good job on making it. "six way joints" I will have to Google how that is made.

 

I got a laugh from Japanese, American, Brazilian and You're in the U.K., if you sell it to someone in say Zambia You will finish the trip round the world. haha

 

Question how tall is it?

Best of luck Googling 'six way joints'...I'd lay odds you won't find it, not at least how it's been done here, that's one at each corner.  Height is around 1115mm x 200mm square and it's not my design, having been first made by Alan Peters in the UK around 1981-82.  The paper is traditional Japanese shoji paper stuck to the frames with rice glue - Rob

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Great lamp! I love the contrasting woods on the bottom section.

Any chance you could explain your 6 way joint? I have a few chunks of scrap 1"x1" maple kicking around and I'd love to try that out!

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Great lamp! I love the contrasting woods on the bottom section.

Any chance you could explain your 6 way joint? I have a few chunks of scrap 1"x1" maple kicking around and I'd love to try that out!

Simple when you know how:

 

DSC_0005-17_zpsd1a36395.jpg

 

It's virtually impossible to do this sort of thing with conventional joinery such as halving joints etc, especially with a six way joint at each corner and a rail underneath - Rob

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Thanks Rob! I'm always good at over complicating things in my head....

Also, thanks for the link Cindy. Those logic puzzles seem like a good way to practice hand saw and chisel techniques.... And end up with some really frustrating stocking stuffers at Christmas time :)

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Good job....   My wife just expanded my honey-do list....  

 

I reviewed your blog for the details -- thanks...  The one thing I still don't get is the design for the acrylic electrical socket...  I get fabricating a custom bulb holder using acrylic to avoid casting shadows on the Shoji panels, but what would help would be a final photo of the acrylic holder with wiring and bulb to see how the guts 'come together'... And where did you get a bare socket to mount to the acrylic?  I assume you either dissembled a standard socket or ordered a bare socket from an electric supply house?

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I have done a lot of lamp repair. You can get the porcelain bases that have bolted guts or riveted guts. When you find bolted ones you buy. They last longer if you use them as is. They also are easier to customize (read remove from the porcelain) for unique installation. My sister had enormous bulbs for photo lights that would rip the guts out of the plastic housing. I used a technique like this to replace the guts without the porcelain.

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Good job....   My wife just expanded my honey-do list....  

 

I reviewed your blog for the details -- thanks...  The one thing I still don't get is the design for the acrylic electrical socket...  I get fabricating a custom bulb holder using acrylic to avoid casting shadows on the Shoji panels, but what would help would be a final photo of the acrylic holder with wiring and bulb to see how the guts 'come together'... And where did you get a bare socket to mount to the acrylic?  I assume you either dissembled a standard socket or ordered a bare socket from an electric supply house?

There's a quite a lot of details of the acrylic bending and final assembly on my Blog, and provided you take some care with the material, it's not hard to work.  The brass light bulb holders are easy to come by in the UK, see here top line, centre and I assume much the same sort of thing can be purchased in the US.  Wiring is simply done with three core, 3A lighting cable and is held to the acrylic with cable ties (one of the very best inventions!) and then standard electrical cable clips (using short nails) to the outside of one of the rear legs - Rob 

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