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I've been entertaining myself recently making a few small boxes from oddments of timber.  The first is a little box in Brazilian Walnut:

 

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...with 50p piece shown for a size comparison.  I then went onto a box with a lift-off lid, made in English Walnut and given to my daughter as a birthday present:

 

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and with the lid off, showing the rosewood lining:

 

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The last little box has a tale to tell.  Last year I paid a visit to Japan and went to see a Japanese swordsmith, Masahira Fujiyasu-san who, when he realised at the end of my visit that I was a bit of a wood mangler :ph34r: , gave me a small billet of an unknown timber.  It's very hard, very heavy, brittle and with a distinct lemon/peppery smell when worked.

 

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...with the final shot showing:

 

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...a corner detail with the lid slightly proud of the front and sides - Rob

 

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I like all of them.  The joinery looks flawless.  English Walnut is a lot more blonde than anything around here, I really like it.   I have no clue on the wood for the last box.

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Did he say if the wood on #3 was native to Japan?  Looking online, I think it might be Japanese Persimmon. It's certainly hard, and looks like it could be a match. I don't see any notes about odor, though.

 

Could be also be camphor, but I wouldn't describe camphor as smelling like lemon/pepper. Distant third is "urushi" - aka Japanese Laquer Tree or Japanese Sumac (often used for urushiol extraction).

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Thanks for the nice words about the boxes.  The English Walnut used here was in fact very light as it's normally much darker, but I thought the oddment I had would make a decent box, especially the bookmatched grain on the lid.  I have no idea if the wood in the third box was a native of Japan, but I assume it was.  When I was given the billet, it was covered in urushi lacquer so obviously came from something that had been dismantled.  The smell isn't overpowering but is quite distinctive...definitely slightly peppery with a hint of lemon.  i'll have to look up bocote and see what it's like - rob 

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This is some beautiful work!!!  I especially like the first box.  Very simple and elegant.  

Is there a name for this type of swivel lid?  I've never seen it before and would love to do a search to see how it's made.  

Is it just a metal pin that's glued into the frame and then fits into the lid that the lid then swivels on (if that makes sense)?  

Obviously there would also need to be a slight gap between the lid and the back of the box so that it has room to swivel open.

 

Thanks!

 

-EG

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This is some beautiful work!!!  I especially like the first box.  Very simple and elegant.  

Is there a name for this type of swivel lid?  I've never seen it before and would love to do a search to see how it's made.  

Is it just a metal pin that's glued into the frame and then fits into the lid that the lid then swivels on (if that makes sense)?  

Obviously there would also need to be a slight gap between the lid and the back of the box so that it has room to swivel open.

 

Thanks!

 

-EG

I don't know what the correct name is, 'pivot pin hinge' maybe?  The sides and lid need to be drilled 'in situ' (fairly tight fit by the way) and the pins (one each side, about 20mm long) are left over size for easy removal with a pair of pliers. The back of the lid can then be relieved and test fitted until it opens smoothly.  For the final fit, the pins are cut to the right length, the ends polished and then pin punched under the surface...once they're in for the final time, they're not coming out again! - Rob

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I don't know what the correct name is, 'pivot pin hinge' maybe?  The sides and lid need to be drilled 'in situ' (fairly tight fit by the way) and the pins (one each side, about 20mm long) are left over size for easy removal with a pair of pliers. The back of the lid can then be relieved and test fitted until it opens smoothly.  For the final fit, the pins are cut to the right length, the ends polished and then pin punched under the surface...once they're in for the final time, they're not coming out again! - Rob

 

Thanks for this, Rob.  I appreciate it.  

Thanks!

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Really beautiful work Rob!

 

I've not made a box with an alternative wood lining on the inside.  Do you laminate the two woods together and then cut the box parts, or insert the lining pieces after the box is built?

 

Pete

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Really beautiful work Rob!

 

I've not made a box with an alternative wood lining on the inside.  Do you laminate the two woods together and then cut the box parts, or insert the lining pieces after the box is built?

 

Pete

Pete, the lining is fitted after the main box has been made - Rob

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