Jointer vs Jointer Plane... which is faster?


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As a power tool junkie for 25 years it has been only very recently that I've begun the transition to hybrid woodworker.

 

One area where I think old school is better, faster and definitely quitter is the jointer.

 

I argue that with a good leg vise on a roubo, jointing with a jointer plane is faster, and quieter with equal results to a 6" jointer. Of course if you have a 12" jointer I can't compete, but for edge jointing the average board, I'll take the roubo/jointer plane combo most every time.

 

This assumes, of course, that you keep your jointer plane sharp.

 

What do you all think?
Jointer or Jointer Plane? Which do you use more often?

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I'm trying to figure out how a hand plane is faster than a powered jointer in any situation other than perhaps sweetening an already straight edge.. I use both tools myself and in terms of speed alone

Off to the joiner again darling   

Bingo!   I also like the peace and quiet of hand tools. 

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Ah, you bring up a good point. My jointer plane sits beneath the workbench and at the ready. If I'm working at the workbench I'm already right there. Similarly the Benchcrafted leg vise just requires a simple spin and the board is locked into place.

 

For my planer I have to walk around to the other side of my shop, open the jointer blast gate, close which ever other blast gate(s) is(are) open, figure out where I set down my safety glasses and hearing protection, put those on, click on the cyclone, set the depth of cut on the jointer (usually it's already set), click it on the jointer and run it through.

 

For me, more often than not, one quick spin of the leg vise wheel, a couple passes with the jointer plane, another quick spin of the leg vise wheel (in the other direction this time) and its off to the table saw.

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I'll also say that jointing an edge, even a longer one, isn't particularly difficult. On the other hand, I'm watching Paul Sellers flatten & square the faces on a board right now and all I can say is "I'd really rather just run in through a jointer/planer."

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No sure about faster, but my vote is for hand jointing. It's not hard, gives great results and the most important thing is you probably should be running a plane over the machined edge anyway.

 

Really depend on the quality of the machine, with the machines I'm lucky to use you the joints are great with no need for hand tools. Hand plane is fun though  :)

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Really depend on the quality of the machine, with the machines I'm lucky to use you the joints are great with no need for hand tools. Hand plane is fun though :)

For what I do, I'll stick to hand work. :)

I'd like to take one of those machines for a test drive though!

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It depends on how much you have to take off.  If a couple of passes of a jointer plane will do it, it's a tossup.  If you have to get a half inch bow out of a board, it's a different story, and no contest. . I use a jointer almost every day, even when I'm framing a house.  I use a jointer plane when it's the best tool for the job, or I'm working on something at the bench that doesn't need a whole lot of help.

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The noise is what has brought me into hand tools and kept me there (even after looking longingly at bandsaws after a long hand rip) 

 

I love my bandsaw. I only use my table saw for long rips. I also have a sliding miter saw, but that rarely gets used.

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I'm trying to figure out how a hand plane is faster than a powered jointer in any situation other than perhaps sweetening an already straight edge.. I use both tools myself and in terms of speed alone, it's not even close. Add a messed up board or multiples and the time difference is even more dramatic.

 

I don't know about faster, but i bet you get better results on highly figured wood with a hand plane than a powered planer.

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I'm trying to figure out how a hand plane is faster than a powered jointer in any situation other than perhaps sweetening an already straight edge.

 

If you have a 13" wide board and a 6" powered jointer, a hand plane will be faster.  ^_^

 

Relating to the glass smooth results from a helical head — I have yet to see any machine, no matter how well tuned, leave a surface that is as good as a hand planed one. Even with a helical head, you'll still get those little scallops, which you can see by setting a hand plane to take a really fine shaving. You'll see that Swiss cheese type shaving showing that the hand plane is taking a shaving that is thinner than the depth of the scallops.

 

This is not to say that one needs to hand plane a surface, of course. There is plenty of good work being done using a powered jointer followed by sanding. Which I think also makes the point: even die hard Normites aren't relying on a machine to leave a final surface.

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If you have a 13" wide board and a 6" powered jointer, a hand plane will be faster.  ^_^

 

Relating to the glass smooth results from a helical head — I have yet to see any machine, no matter how well tuned, leave a surface that is as good as a hand planed one. Even with a helical head, you'll still get those little scallops, which you can see by setting a hand plane to take a really fine shaving. You'll see that Swiss cheese type shaving showing that the hand plane is taking a shaving that is thinner than the depth of the scallops.

 

This is not to say that one needs to hand plane a surface, of course. There is plenty of good work being done using a powered jointer followed by sanding. Which I think also makes the point: even die hard Normites aren't relying on a machine to leave a final surface.

 

I dont know anything about hand planing. How long does it take to joint, plane and thickness an average reasonably  decent piece of rough cut lumber 13" wide by say 5 ft long?

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==>  but i bet you get better results on highly figured wood with a hand plane than a powered planer

 

as in most things, it depends...  You can get jointer knives (or, in my case, Tersa) with back bevels that handle figured stock just fine...  Helical heads can also help...  I've got a LA jointer plane as well as a York pitch -- they are great for fine-tuning, but for speed, the stationary powered jointer wins every time...

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Relating to the glass smooth results from a helical head — I have yet to see any machine, no matter how well tuned, leave a surface that is as good as a hand planed one. Even with a helical head, you'll still get those little scallops, which you can see by setting a hand plane to take a really fine shaving. You'll see that Swiss cheese type shaving showing that the hand plane is taking a shaving that is thinner than the depth of the scallops.

 

I'll take a helical head surface over one flattened with a jointer plane any day. I don't know about you guys, but my jointer plane tends to leave track marks on the surface. If my planer leaves minute scallops, they are completely undetectable to my fingers, my eyes, and my straight edge. I really don't care if the hand plane's eyes can see it. :) 

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Wow, this has been an interesting discussion. That's what I love about this group.

I guess I should have been more clear. Obviously, if you have a twisted hunk of wood that you are trying to turn into a usable board, or a bow shaped chunk that you need to work down, the jointer will be faster.

 

If I am jointing up pieces to build a raised panel (which comes up a lot in my world.) I can take what's already a decent board, pop it in the speedy leg vise, run the jointer plane over it and I never have to leave my bench. It is fast, easy and buttery smooth. I love my jointer plane. I have a basic 6" jointer with knives and its fine. But the finish isn't as good as my jointer plane. (no helical heads in my shop.)

 

Either way, I cut the other side of the board on my table saw to make the two sides parallel.

By the way, Graham, I have wicked jointer envy.

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I'll take a helical head surface over one flattened with a jointer plane any day. I don't know about you guys, but my jointer plane tends to leave track marks on the surface. If my planer leaves minute scallops, they are completely undetectable to my fingers, my eyes, and my straight edge. I really don't care if the hand plane's eyes can see it. :)

Marc, I agree with you, however, if the jointed surface is narrower than my plane it becomes a non-factor. Wouldn't you agree?

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