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Simon Jarløv

How to fix the chuck for an old hand drill?

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Hi

 

I have a very fine, old hand drill that I have been using a lot but some time ago the chuck stopped working properly and I have been trying to find a replacement or fix it but I haven't been able to get anywhere. So - perhaps one on this forum might have a solution.

 

The chuck itself has three jaws that were held together/apart by three springs but the springs have become dislodged and so the jaws don't sit where they should. I can take the springs out but not the jaws since the front and back openings are too small for me to pull them out and I don't think that the chuck can be opened.

 

Has anyone had the same problem and if so, can it be fixed at all? If not, where do I replace the chuck?

 

I made a similar request on YouTube but I thought it might get a bit more response on this forum.

 

- Thanks

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zSsKDdTQr4

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I watched your video and unfortunately you only show the chuck - not the drill itself, at least not long enough to make a good identification other than to recognize that it's an egg beater type.  It would be nice to know the manufacture if that's possible.  It would've also been nice to get a better look at the chuck but most of the time it's obscured in your hand.

 

The best I can suggest at this point is that the outer portion of the chuck is press fit over the inner to hold the jaws and, at one time, the springs in.  If you could build a jig to separate the two halves, perhaps with a gear puller and some threaded rod to screw the chuck onto, you might be able to rebuild the innards. 

 

Next best would be to prowl e-bay for a beater model of the same manufacture for a drill with a serviceable chuck and to make a swap.

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Pressed fittings are sometimes found (but rare in traditional tools.) I would inspect carefully to locate if the chuck can be separated with pipe wrenches. I am including an image for visualization. Many chuck designs are available in Google' image search function. What would help narrow this down is the name of the maker of either drill or chuck if you can find it. I assume this is why Byrdie wants a look at your drill?

post-9382-0-09400100-1377447973_thumb.jp

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Hello again

 

Thanks for the replies. The video was done very quickly, one take and all so it is not the presentation of either the drill or the problem. I'll take some proper pictures and upload them so you can get a better look. But thanks for now :)

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Pressed fittings are sometimes found (but rare in traditional tools.) I would inspect carefully to locate if the chuck can be separated with pipe wrenches. I am including an image for visualization. Many chuck designs are available in Google' image search function. What would help narrow this down is the name of the maker of either drill or chuck if you can find it. I assume this is why Byrdie wants a look at your drill?

You are correct, sir! (Doing my best Ed McMahon impression - The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson for all the youngsters and non Americans.)  Knowing the manufacture of the drill and/or chuck will give the best information as to how to disassemble and repair the chuck or let us know if a replacement part should be sought.  Nice job of finding the mechanical drawing.  Definitely not a press fit on that one!  Let's hope that's what Simon has!

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Hi again

 

So I have taken a few pictures to clarify the situation. Unfortunately the drill does not have any markings that would identify the maker. There is a remaint of a sticker but I don't know if it belongs to the maker or the shop that sold it.

 

 

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/694/f7ji.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/24/d05u.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/513/he23.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/543/p2a5.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/838/l0l2.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/838/l0l2.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/854/keah.jpg/

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Looks like a Millers Falls if my memory serves. The triangle label is a MF label. One of the heavy duty, closed gear models. The chuck base will unscrew. You may have to soak it in a light oil first, then tap the back lightly with a small hammer to see if that loosens it. If not, wrap it in a cloth and try a vise grip. It's possible one or more of the springs have broken or just slipped out of place which can happen if the jaws are retracted too far.

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It does look like a Millers Falls drill. I looked inside the chuck and there are grooves on the inside which means that it probably can be pulled apart. I tried soaking it in oil, tapping it with a hammer and loosen it with a vise grip but so far no luck. Any ideas on how to screw it apart?

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Well, it's definitely a Millers Falls drill. It looks remarkably similar to their old designs. It would appear that it can be screwed apart but I'm still working on getting the two parts apart but no luck. Any advice would be helpful.

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The last ditch effort is to heat the outer shell, just momentarliy to expand it and then try two vise grips or similar pliers. A propane torch for a few moments or a quick pass over a stove flame will do to expand the shell.

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I hate Vise Grips for this work. I use Harbor Freight pipe wrenches and strips of rubber roofing media to protect the parts. Where in the world are you Simon? Do you know what I mean by pipe wrench?

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I live in Denmark but I do know what a pipe wrench is. I have a bunch of pliers and wrenches that might work but otherwise a visit to a hardware store could do the trick. At the moment I have the chuck soaked in oil and when I get back to the workshop, I'm gonna give it another go.

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I have found (thanks to a lorry driver I know) that soking in Coca-Cola is very good at unsiezing nuts and what not. Its corrosive effect seems to penetrate rusty threads better than oils. I thought it was an urban legend, but it does actually work!

 

John

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