Lathe question


Egraff
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Hello, 

 

I have very little experience with lathes....  but someone I know is selling this lathe and I'm not sure whether or not it's a good buy. It is a Ryobi 18 inch, it is about 10 years old, and it has been used only a few times.  It also comes with the turning tools pictured.  

 

Can anyone tell if this lathe is missing any parts or if there is anything wrong with it?  I don't even know if this model (or even ryobi in general) is a good lathe that works well in the first place.  Or would I just be better off with a Jet or Harbor Freight?   I'd like to use it for pens and tool handles, etc. 

 

Thank you!!

post-6579-0-36158600-1379883391_thumb.jp

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The lathe is fine for pen turning or small handles.  The tools are very nice.  and it has a Penn state ind. duplicator attachment. for making pens and other turnings quickly.  depending on the price it would be a good starter lathe.  Biggest thing to check is that the drive center lines up with the live center(the two points should tough each other).  

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the tools alone cost at least 125 the duplicator looking at another 50 bucks the lathe I don't know im guessing in the 200-300 range make shure it has a tool rest and most lathes come with a faceplate.  let us know if you end up buying or not.   if  you get bit by the turning bug you will want more help and im glad to give you some advice. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

So I'm happy to report that I ended up picking up a lathe!!!

I didn't actually get the one posted above in the end...  I found a different great deal on a craftsman 2HP 36" variable speed.  It came with a very sturdy metal stand, 4 inch and 8 inch face plates, a bowl turning set, a duplicator, a drill chuck, a 4-grip chuck thingy (don't know what it's called), a spur center and live center, a small and a large tool rest, and 2 sets of turning tools (one of them was a 5 piece Robert Sorby which I understand is supposed to be pretty good).  All this came for a little over $400 and lots of heavy lifting :-)

 

I hope I didn't make a mistake passing up on the smaller set (above) and getting this bigger one instead, but I just couldn't pass this one up since it seemed like a good deal to me.  I think it's hopefully worth it and I didn't go with the wrong option...  

 

Anyhow, thanks for the input and I look forward to firing this baby up and giving some wood a spin / learning this turning business!!

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EG, I think you got a good deal on your new obsession, er, tool.  Getting one that already has the 4 jaw chuck is much better than trying to figure it out afterwards on numbers you can't read.  Getting two sets of tools (including 1 from Sorby), and 36 inch bed, that's all gravy.

 

Chuck: you can get some decent used tools that are older, as most wood workers are well aware.  Sometimes, just a little elbow grease, TLC, and better lighting, and it's worth it.  

 

This might not be one of those gems.  The bed is just two rails, secured at the ends of the system.  Unless you are willing to check they are still square and accurate (and coplaner to each other), you could face serious problems if they slip out of alignment.  I'm not as worried about the motor; my grandfather used one motor for all of his power tools, and just bolted the base down and connected the belt.  It was a standard thing from the early 40s and 50s.  the tools in the rack look like high speed steel, nothing exceptional but possible to hide the lower end of the quality spectrum.  the calipers and face plate are not that remarkable.  You basically are paying for the table, and getting some tools attached to it.

 

this does not mean it won't be a bad tool.  But if it was me, I personally wouldn't do it.  For $40, I might.

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Chuck, that lathe has 2 red flags; it's a tube lathe and it has no tapers. You'll also want to check the threads and make sure they are something common like 3/4-16 or 1-8 or getting additional accessories may be a headache. This one is better if you can talk him down a few bucks.

http://baltimore.craigslist.org/tls/4102552092.html

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  • 7 years later...

I have a family friend who has a Ryobi ML618 wood lathe with tools it has a single chuck and seems to have all the pieces (rest and such)is ther anything I should know before buying it (given i have only used a lathe once and just herd he had it and thought it would be fun to try getting into).if there are any tips or tricks to help use them I would greatly appreciate them aswell. 

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I am not familiar with this lathe and only did some superficial research, so take my thoughts for what they are worth:  It don't look like much, so don't pay  much and don't expect much.  

While the Ryobi looks like it will in fact turn wood and will let you make things like pens and drawer knobs, I don't think it is going to do much more, and I don't think it will do those things very well.  (And in fact may not be a good platform for a novice to learn on).

The thing about "trying to get into turning", is that most folks who try turning actually do get into turning and would grow out of this machine in a short bit.  

It's hard to know what the fair market price for something like this is, especially since it doesn't seem to have been a popular model.  

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On 11/14/2020 at 7:20 AM, Mark J said:

I am not familiar with this lathe and only did some superficial research, so take my thoughts for what they are worth:  It don't look like much, so don't pay  much and don't expect much.  

While the Ryobi looks like it will in fact turn wood and will let you make things like pens and drawer knobs, I don't think it is going to do much more, and I don't think it will do those things very well.  (And in fact may not be a good platform for a novice to learn on).

The thing about "trying to get into turning", is that most folks who try turning actually do get into turning and would grow out of this machine in a short bit.  

It's hard to know what the fair market price for something like this is, especially since it doesn't seem to have been a popular model.  

thank you for the advice its very helpful.

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