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How do you categorize yourself?

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Oh boy, this forum never lets me down. Would we move our grits to a lettering system? 80A, 120B, 180C, 220D, 320DD?

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Oh boy, this forum never lets me down. Would we move our grits to a lettering system? 80A, 120B, 180C, 220D, 320DD?

I'll take a 320DD please, it's great for finishing...

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if my project takes longer then a few sessions unless its a really complex build that im enjoying then I usually don't want to finish it.  so for the most part im a power tool user don't really want to spend a month cutting the joint just right when a router table will cut my joint perfect every time in a couple of hours.  a lot of wood workers talk about how they love the sound of a quiet space with nothing more then the plane running back and forth.  I would rather have music blaring, table saw humming and roaring and people to interact with.  but then ill sit down and pull out my carving knife and start carving a block of wood and listen to a audio book.  so while I use a router to get a perfect edge on my board,  use my mini router to carve out a depression in my wood and a belt sander to make my inlay flush.  Ill then spend a few hours carving out some grass and weeds for embellishment.  here is a example of a hybrid work

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I enjoy the hand tool side of woodworking very much. I like the feeling of the tools, as well as the quiet "zen" it provides. Sometimes I'll go down to my bench and tune up my handplanes just to take shavings for a little while. Very peaceful.

Now that being said, power tools are my "go to" for milling and about 70% of my joinery tasks. It's hard to argue with fast and accurate!

Sometimes a hand tool is the ideal tool, like was mentioned earlier. Cutting small parts is far easier with a backsaw and bench hook than a table saw. Trimming a tenon is far easier with a plane than any power tool. Just depends on the situation.

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I'm not even going to bring up the possibilities of wet sanding, that would just be inappropriate B) ..... 

 

Back on topic, I'm mostly a power tool guy (90% +/-) but some detail can only be done by hand. 

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I like my power tools, but have also enjoyed days in the shop that are unplugged. I guess that makes me a hybrid woodworker.

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I had my answer all ready and then Eric basically said it.  To me, a "hybrid" woodworker is one who uses the best tool for the job/circumstance, whether or not it has a tail.  For me currently, the majority of my work includes some sort of powered tool but I still use some hand saws and chisels on a regular basis.  I several planes but currently they're used less frequently.

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I think it is a marketing term like someone else here eluded to used to separate from the herd. The technique is used all the time in music: "our music isn't like any other band because we rearranged the adjectives and still sound like Soundgarden".  :)   It is similar to saying "Asian influenced" whenever something is cut (accidentally or not) crooked.  Didn't see much of that in Japan or China but ok.

 

The most I'll give "Hybrid woodworker" is the ability to do a project start to finish with either hand tools or power tools; it doesn't have to get mixed up on the same project.  If power tools make your deadline but you could have done it with hand tools, you get the Hybrid woodworker badge in my mind.

 

I don't think you could be a hybrid woodworker and not know how to flatten a board using only hand planes or create a complex molding profile with multiple router passes (kudos if you can custom grind a shaper blade and use the shaper... I can't).    And I don't mean the book knowledge; physical experience.

 

Double bonus points if you look at a problem and head to the kitchen for something that solves it rather than a Rockler catalog.

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Being pretty "green" to woodworking I have no idea.  I enjoy a little of both.  I have more power tools than hand tools, even though I am building my collection as we speak.  

 

In general I don't like labels for this kind of thing.  In my opinion it is about the craftsmanship of the output and what you enjoy.  98% of the population couldn't produce a nice piece of furniture with either power or hand tools.  So to me it is just splitting hairs. I say don't worry about labels and don't let people put you in a box. Build what you like an use whatever tools you want.

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Well said, Josh.

 

But I think your 98% estimation is way generous.  I'd call it more like 99.9% or 99.999%...if you think about the number of people who actually woodwork, then whittle that down to the number of people who are capable of producing fine furniture...it's miniscule.  Which makes your point even stronger.  It doesn't matter, because like Chris said...it's the results that matter, not how you get there.

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Double bonus points if you look at a problem and head to the kitchen for something that solves it rather than a Rockler catalog.

 

 Gotta give this a try next time   :D

 

I'm going to store my 1" chisel in the knife drawer so I can rack up the points.

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